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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 23, 1910, Image 7

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AMUSEMENTS
LAST FIVE NIGHTS.
MATIXEES THL-ESDAY AND SATUBDIY
rhnrsfiay M&titw* at Special Prlces-41, 25c
BLANCHE WALSH
In Her L«t«t Sncwss.
"THEOTHER_ WOMAN"
Beginning NEXT MONDAT
LILLIAN RUSSELL
/'IN SEARCH OF A SINNER"
Advance Sale of S*«ats Opens Thursday.
MATISEE THUESDAY, DEC. 1-OiaY TIME
ELLEN TERRY
IMeoissing Shakesppare's Heroines With
•* UlustraUre Actinjr.
IP VALENCIA "ft*
PAVLOWAMORDKIN
Aad IKPERIAX EUSSIAJI BALLET
AND OSCHESTKA.
From tb«» MetropolitHn Opem House.
TflNinHT **rt«lay >icht. Tomorrow
lUiliU.ll Aft> and satnrday Aft.
"THE ARABIAN XIGHTS," Etc.
Tomorrow (Thun.) and Salurdaj-
\ichifc and Sunday Aft.
" GISELLE" and MjscelXane<m« Works.
' Rry flffiro Today i:ntil 5 p. m. at Kher-
Tonight Ht Theater. Tomorrow »t Va-
]r»nria Theater All Pay. Pri<fs— s3. $2,
I Sl..V>. >1. General Adrolsgioa $1.
1 TETRAZZIISI
§ Tuesday a.nd Thursday Evenings. Dec 6-8.
"Saturday Matinee. Dec. 10.
PrtoN--$3. $2. $1.r.0. <;en«>r«l Admission $1
Mail Order* Now to \V. !\u25a0. Greenbaum.
Safest iind M«st Masrnificent Theater in America
HATIKEE TODAY AND EVERY DAY
EVERY EVENING AT 8:15
INTERNATIONAL. VAUDEVILLE! —
THE SIX MI'SICAL CUTTYS (Bmtiers and
StFterfi; JAMES CALLAHAN and JENNY ST.
3EORGE. in Their Beautiful Irish Character
StudT. "The Old Neighborhood"; D. J. AN-
DREE'S STTDIES IN PORCELAIN; THE TEM-
PLE QUARTET: GRANT and HOAG; JEWELL'S
MANIKINS: THE GREAT ASAHI. Assisted by
the A*aht Quintet: NEW ORPHEUM MOTION
PICTURES. Last Week, Tremendous Hit,
GEORGE BEEAN and His Associate Players in
"The Sign of the Hose." ?
Ere'nft Price*. 10c. :Sse. sflc. 75c: box seats, $1.
Mat. Prices (except Punday* and Holidays). 10c.
g.y. S(V. PHONES: DOUGLAS 70. HOME Cir.7o.
dS. L.OV ERICH* MAHA&ia
1 Eliie St. Near Fillmore. Class A" Theater.
ALL THIS WEEK— Last Time Sat. Nieht.
Special Mat. Thursday, Thanksgiving Day.
BILLY "Single" CLIFFORD
I r.-esccts Himself in the Musical Fantasy.
< "The GIRL, the MAN and the GAME"
Night Prices — 25c to $1. Sat. and Sun.
. Mat. Prices— £sc to 75c.
Conuneacingr Sunday Mat. Ker. 27. "MBS.
"STIGGS OF THE CABBAGE PATCH.'*
P KDIfJCV THEATER
drLi\Ji\l^J\ Ellis at mimore
Phone West 1194
S. LOVERICH. Manager.
SECOKD ANT> LAST BIG WEEK.
Special Mat. Thursday. Thanksgirtng Day.
MAX DILL
i In tbe clever Piiley-Luders Musical Comedy,
"The GIRL and
„ the BAt^OIN"
) . Nirht End Sun. Mat. Prices — 23c to $1;
i Sstu-dsr Mot. "Pop." prices — 25c and 50c.
Comniencire Monday Kig-ht, Not. 28 — MAX
DIXL in "DREAM CITY."
: miv,**- T4gSflgj>VU tfJjlSlcAlHsteT St.
mT x « r Market.
i*k I^^^ Phones:
! <<JJ S^^rjZOYZ OF 7ZS Market ISO
• u^.iS. XHAXKBGiWifG AND SATURDAY.
DANI£L V. ARTHUR Presents
In the Sensational Socg Comedy Saccess,
A Matinee Ido!
(Mi:«!c by SILVIO HEIN>
%Vltb LOUISE DRESSER
AND THAT DAUDY CHORUS .
seiits from $2 to SiV. at the Theater and
Emporfana. Next— -THE KISSING GIRL."
A I C'h 7 A D Sutler andSteiner
aiuuufciui. nome phone 54242
BELASCO & MAYER. Owners and Managers
TCiaGHT— ALL THIS WEEK— TONIGHT
MATIXXE TOMORROW (Thanksg-iving Dty)
Clyde FHoh'fl Finest Coraedr.
Its First Presentation in Stock.
PRICES— Night. 25c to fl. iTatinee. 25c to 50c
MATINEE SATURDAY AND SUNDAY.
Seats for Sale at Box Office end Emporium.
NEXT WEEK — Dramatic Sensation of the Day,
$"THE DOLLAR MARK"S
It ran l n consecotive weeks in Los Angeles.
LUR.LINE
BUSH AXD LARKIX STS.,
OCEAN WATER BATHS
Sti irainlnc and Tub Baths
Salt water direct from the ocean. Open
eTerr d«T *&& erenlng. lnclnding Sundays
cad bolidaya. from 7 a. m. to 10 p. m. Spec-
tators' jrallery free.
Natatortum reserred Toesday end rriday
morciag from 8 o'clock to noon for women
"PlKered Ocenn "Water Plnnsre"
COMFORTABLY HEATED
Hct Air Hair Dryera for Women Bathers.
Tbe popular reeort for a winter's day or
eTcnlng. Temperature of building adjusted
ERAKCT TUB BATHS. 2151 GEARY ST.
•*** KEAR DEVISADERO
CONCERTS, LECTURES, ETC.
ENID^RANDTT
TUB MARVELOUS VOIXG PIAMST
NOVELTY THEATER. THIS EVENING.
WEDNESDAY, Nor. 23, at R o'clock, assisted by
Mrs Noah Brandt, her f-ole instructor in Amer-
ica arid Europe. Tickets on wle twlay at Wiley
• B. Allen's Music Store. 135 Kearnj Ft., and st
Norelty Theater this evening. Mason & Hamlln
piano u*ed. '
jg^ TONIGHT
Wm SOCIETY, NIGHT
jSjf OAKLAND
j|^B^ AUTO SHOW
X h ~-':-":"'^«a~ -' : -" : "'^«a iboß.v park
r \ ' Admission 50c
WEEKLY^CALI^ $i PERYEAR
BALLINGER DESIRES
NEW OIL LAND LAW
•\u25a0 - '
Secretary Outlines Recommen
dations to President as
I Result of Investigation
{Special Disfxzich to The Call]
"WASHINGTON*. Nov. 22.— That the
existing law providing for the location
and entry of mineral oil land on the
public domain is wholly inadequate Is
the opinion of Secretary Ballinger of
the department of the interior. The
secretary in his annual report *will
recommend important amendments.
Assistant Secretary Pierce visited the
California oil fields recently and made
a personal inspection of the situation.
Since his return he- and Secretary Bal
linger have had several, conferences on
the subject as a result of which the
secretary has formulated his recom
mendations.
"By act of congress approved Febru
ary il. 1897," .said the secretary today,
"public lands containing mineral oils
were declared to be placers and 'were
opened to entry under the general
placer mining law. Under that law no
valid claim can be located without dis
covery of mineral.
"This is satisfactory as to placer
mineral, which usually lies in or near
the surface, but not as to oil. It takes
from six months to a year or more to
test oil lands and make an actual dis
covery. The initial expense of the dis
covery ranges from J20.000 to $100,000
and in many instances to more than
this. • .
"A paper location of prospective oil
lands made prior to discovery is not
usually respected by other oil pros
pectors. One prospector erects his der-'
ricks and proceeds with work upon his
claim; another prospector will erect his
derricks upon the same claim and pro
ceeds with his work also. It is then
a contest between the two for the first
discovery.
LEASING SYSTEM FAVORED V
"The law should be amended-* so as
to protect the first bona fide locator
and to give him a reasonable time to
make his discovery. This recommenda
tion applies only to bona fide occupants
Or. claimants who are in diligent prose
cution of work leading to discovery of
oil or gas at the time of any with
drawal of the land under executive
direction.
"I am in favor of a general leasing
system of oil and gas bearing lands —
such a system as will promote legiti
mate development of this Industry, pre
vent monopoly and conserve one of the
great national resources of, the country.
"The oil lands of the five civilized
tribes in Oklahoma is developed on the
leasing system, the term of the lease
extending as long as oil is found in
commercial quantities. The lessee usu
ally pays to the government for the
use of the Indian one eighth in value
of the oil produced as royalty. This
system has worked out very satisfac
torily and is in use in many oil regions
of the country where land is held in
private ownership and not by the gov
ernment.
"I would apply the leasing feystem
only to areas withdrawn for classifica
tion or classified by the geological sur
vey. The unknown and unexplored oil
lands I would leave open to exploration
and location under the general placer
act as amended as I have suggested.
This would give a reward to the dili
gent prospector. Even then the sur
rounding lands could be withdrawn
from further location after the dili
gent prospector had secured his first,
claims.
"In California quite extensive oil
fields have recently been developed.
The price of coal for fuel there is
enormous, ranging from $11 to $15 per
ton for bituminous coal and much
more for anthracite. Much of the coal
consumed in California comes from
foreign countries — Australia and Brit
ish Columbia. The New Mexico, Utah
and Wyoming bituminous coal costs the
California consumer about the same
price as foreign coal.
LOW PRICE FOR FUEL
"Crude oil is piped from the Califor
nia oil fields to the bay cities and sold
at the present time at S5 cents per, bar
rel. Three barrels of crude oil at the
total price of $2.55 is substantially
equivalent in fuel value to one ton of
bituminous coal costing from $11 to $15.
"The use of oil for .domestic con
sumption will reduce the price of fuel
to the small consumer several times. I
have had the patent office examined
and find that many patents have been
issued for stoves which may be suc
cessfully used for the consumption of
crude oil for family use. The reason,
I am told, why crude oil has not been
used extensively for family use in Cali
fornia is because of the heretofore un
certain production of crude oil in x that
state. The railroads and steamship
companies are using it with satisfac
tory results.
"I shall recommend that the; govern
ment adopt a liberal policy in opening
the oil lands in California and other
oil bearing states containing public oil
lands. The government ought to sup
port any movement which would re
duce the enormous cost of fuel.
"The state ought to be asked to co
operate with the government to, pre
vent the monopoly of the oil business
and effectually to secure a reasonable
price to the consumer. In my Judgment
this can be accomplished if the state
should declare the consumption of oil a
public use. The state should pass a
law to this effect and place the regu
lation of the price of crude oil in the
hands of a discreet commission."
MAP OF OID FIELD
ISSUED BY BUREAU
A map of the Whittier-Olinda oil
field, in Los Angeles and Orange coun
ties, has been issued by the California
state mining bureau. Lewis E. Aubury,
under whose direction -the map -was
executed, obtained the help of -the
large oil interests of the district and
all holdings, wells, abandoned claims,
roads and railroads are to be found
on the map. , .
NEGRO LYNCHED FOR
ASSAULT ON WOMAN
PEJCSACOLA. Xov. 22.— 1n the pres
ence of the passengers and crew -of
the train, Bob Matthews, a negro
charged with assaulting Mrs.;Snowden
near Pensacola Beveral months : ago,
was taken from a train -at Gull point
by 40 masked, men this" morning and
lynched by the side of the railroad
track. ' C V:,.. ":'%\u25a0; \u25a0\u25a0U % l"'.
AAiUSEMENTS
xj^^ RACING
jockey^glub
HrTS^^v Oakland Swi Track
t^Jji-Nif, * EACINO -ETEEY
43^5^ il WEEKDAY,
U HATNiOK- SHIffE
fiIX'BACES EACH^DAY .-.
First Eace at 1:40 p. m. "
. Admission— MeD, $2; Ladies, fl. \u25a0
For Fpeclal train* stopping at the track, take
E. P. Ferry, foot of Market at.: leare at 12 m.,
thereafter every 20 minutes until 1:40 p. m. No
unoklcg la the last two cart, wbich are reserred
for ladles and their escorts.. * ;—\u25a0'*.-,,
THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, Pr«lid«t»
I'EECX .Wt TBEAT, BecxeUr/* "? ; - — ,* r ;.-_,
THE^ sM yRANGISCQ <^LL, W^
SUNDAY night a -burglar, climbed a fire escape and ; stepped through an
- open window, oh\he-third floor of a PagjEic avenue apartment house^H^
was cautious 1 an.d>quicC but there was a slight noise .that half wakened; a
\u25a0sleeper in the 'room. She stirred a little and turned : toward? the
dreaming she. saw. a, man.' In a mment\she woke thoroughly and sat. up' in
bed, looking wide eyed at a man, who quickly s/epped out; of the window to
the fire escape. - V' - r v{{
"What do i youuwant?"ishe. asked, indignantly. _,:.. c , v ' ;-
The burglar went on without stopping, to tell; her. It .probably " struck' him
as a foolish '^ques'tio'n^.'Sh'ev ran to the window. : to ; watch him skip down; the
line 'of ladders to 'the' ground. He seemed as .nimble ;. and easy about .it as a
circus acrobat.', When he had disappeared sheicalled* the family. ;
Excited detours: of. the room revealed the man's dampt finger marks on
polished mahogany,3«t'' : iiothing' had been, taken. rter, ; first movement had
interrupted his /work.'* When this' was ascertained: the, girl; remembered that
she had forgoti^n'-to : '/jje ! frightened, but it- was.too.late to do- anything about
it.. The momentftor terror had passed before^she woke. - The family openly
praised her couragerVand. her -mother- thought it Avonderful: that she had not
screamed and fairitpd.>;She; was; called a veryrbrave girl for watching a man
climb out of her .wlndiDW.-and : dpwn a fire escape.. She assured them courage
had nothing, to do with ;hV surprise and. indignation, and, said it might have
been terrifying had 'she'\ watched the man climb up - and in. . . "• ;
- » Later that' day,, the having really occurred- at 3/o'clock
morning, other ,peo'ple congratulated her.on her . braverjv. and she became a
heroirfe. \u25a0', Every onetbut the -girl believes she was remarkably self-possessed
and fearless because;she\ was not a perfect idiot \u25a0"and^silly.,- coward/ screaming
insanely over a '\u25a0 ma^ .-running, away, in the usual -.accepted* manner:. 1
•'There is no particular v point to this s-tory, except, that, it, is entirely .true
and indicates how^'littl^is expected \u0084of. women and how they .may at times
display -simple, ordinary % cpmmon;.sensp.
Miss Constance • ftlc- *r *
Laren Is one of the .
most popular debutantes -9^,
of the season, and shells iSR
the recipient of "..many A-:
social favors among., her-y^.
older friends as, well.as >,;
In the younger •'\u25a0"set.i^r;
Miss McLaren will ffe '^
the complimented "guestj- ..\u25a0
at the \tea tha.l
Horace G., Hellmann'^v
will give next^Sund^y • ,
afternoon at; her*£om9;f C
in Gough t strefet.<".* -Th'e'^
debutantes^.. a*nd gi thelt^ : ,
elder fels^ers . t" Joy s*f|
this charming* affair. rv ; '« - ;;
Miss Ernestine McNeaV \^ :
is one of the> debutantes .^
who is receiving, social. '.,;
attention before'tier for- \u25a0 V^.
mal coming ,'put • party^S~
and will be r .tji<j;centralii ¥
figure at severalVof the^i'-^
smaller ] parties^Jpf.? 1 the. T —
month. She will^ share^. ™
the honors with ' Mrs.^! *„
Chris Miller at the 'tea \u25a0'•
that Miss Marian Miller' '/^
will give next Tu'eiday, ;;
and half a hundred Of >
the younger girls have '
been Invited for the aft
ernoon.
• * *
Since her return from
abroad Mrs,. Frederick
Sharon has been the in-,
centive for many enter
tainments. One of the
luncheons of s*esterday
was given for Mrs.
Sharon with Mrs. 'James j
W. Keeney as hostess at
her home in ' Buchanan
street. Among those
who were bidden to
meet Mrs. Sharon yes
terday were:
Mrs. William Terls,
Mrs. Patrick Calhoon
Mrs. Robert Oxnard
Mrs. Charles Page
Mrs. Edwmrd Ejre
Mrs. Howard Colt
Mm. George Mendell
MUs I^aura McKinstry \u25a0 .
Miss Mary Friedlander | „
Miss Fanny Frledlander
** * .
Mrs. Tasker BUss en- ,
tertained more than 100
army friends at an elab
orate reception yester
day afternoon at Fort
Mason. Mrs. Bliss, as
sisted by her daughter,
Miss Eleanor Bliss, has
entertained at several .
interesting affairs of the
season. In the service '
set.
FREE LECTURES FOR
PUBLIC AT SCHOOLS
At the suggestion of School Director
Henry Payot the board of education has
established 14 lecture cetera in this
city for the benefit of those who are in
terested in educational . matters. , The
centers selected are the Hancock, Mad
ison, Sutro,^girls' high. Mission" gram
mar. Laguna 1 Honda, Sheridan,' Monroe,
Junipers. Serra (Holly park), Yerba
Buena, Adams, Mission high, Frank
McCoppin and Spring Valley schools. J
"These -lectures," said Payot yester
day, "are intended for the general pub
lic, as they will be free. 'They will be
for adults as well as the pupils of the
high and grammar schools and : will be
like, the ; lectures given in New York
city "with great success.
The lectures will be Illustrated by
moving pictures and cover science, his
tory, art, music, travel and many other
topics. Prominent citizens and pro
fessors at the : universities of the state
have volunteered to lecture and a local
firm has furnished a large catalogue
of educational J films for moving picture
machines and offered to furnish, free
any of the films* that ; may be selected
for, educational J purposes. ;:j_ .";
**The Californja clXib has promised to
assist -in ; making/the lectures | a . suc
cess, I and i I am'; preparing > a "lecture on
the i historical v chateaus ? of -rNormandle,
Brittany? and^Touraine^ which " will be
delivered ; shortly, flt ; is V proposed %£p
have^ one of these lectures every night
in the, week except Sunday."," .: ,-
A lecture was delivered
for., the'- pupils; of Sutro school on '.The
Origin and Purpose of Thanksgiving in
the United':. States,"" illustrated with
stereopticbnl views of .colonial: scenes.
The; same j lecture" will be' given. In the
Lacuna, Yerba • Buena, and Munroe
schools. .-..\u25a0-, ' ..,;\u25a0\u25a0. - \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0 . JSSSSKi
CLERKV OWINGS66S, k o ?
; ENTERS^ BANKRUPTCY
.Ernest H. Card, a clerk owing' $665
and • with 'no i available,, resources, % peti
tioned the; United|Statesj district court
yesterday, to" t declare »h ini* bankrupt. -:'A'
siml lar t ; petition : was ' filed ( by.; Harry ,C.'
Stevens, ; an"' Alameda •« painter, i -; .'whose'
'debtsta^BrreKate"s2l7^ and -whose .as
sets amounfto's9o.; : - -^-_-x_wiy,
THE
SMART
SET
1 Miss Florence . Hop
.kiss v^wiil ,be. ! hostess at
•arrinformal luncheon.to
"dayN*in -^compliment %to
;Miss rL'nwan'.iGoss, w i io
is'^the : ho.use giiest of,
.her'aunt and uncle, Mr.
•and; Mrs. Henry T. Scott.
Miss , Goss i has. been en-
.by several 'q£
the •Burlinga.'me girls
and has Vbeenvthe feted
guest' also; v at many 'of
the recent 1 partfes in the"
citys)V-'^^he . wilj
probably 'for -the entire
'winter*/ arid '\u25a0' will, be at
the later affairs of the
•season/ V. -" ,
• .'Mrs. W. H. Obear will
entertain "at a bridge
party- Tuesday Novem
ber 29, and the session
at c4rds will be followed
by tea for an additional
number'of guests.
:?\u25a0-\u25a0 \u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0;•. \u25a0* •\u25a0\u0084• •.
: . vMrs? - ; William Elliott
\u25a0has sent- out cards for
one . pt * v; fhe, • elaborate
.luncheons of I the week
.to Tie- given next Satur
day at her" home in Fil
bert street for a score of
guests.
\u2666' * •
Mrs. William Ashe
was hostess at an in
formal tea yesterday at
the Palace, and among
the guests were Mrs.
Francis J. Heney and
Mrs. J. D. Peters.
• • . •
One of the weddings
of next month that will
be of particular interest
to local society as well
as In the army • set is
that of Miss Eleanor
Terry, daughter of Rear
Admiral Terry, and Lieu
tenant Filippo Camperlo.
The marriage will take
place at | noon, . Decem
ber 1. in the St. Thom
as Protestant Episcopal
church in Washington!
D. C. . The bride elect
has many friends , here
who have < .wired their
messages of felicitations
upon receiving the wed
ding cards. ••
Mrs. Howard Hamil
ton Hart has sent out
cards for an elaborate
luncheon to be given
Monday, December 5, at
the Fairmont for a large
number of guests.
NEWBEGIN TAKEN IN
ON HIS FIRST SPIN
j John J. Newbegin did not belle his
name when he testified before Police
Judge Shortair yesterday on -his own
behalf In. answer to a charge of : fast
driving with,. an automobile. \
"I am just a new beginner at the
auto game, your honor," explained
Newbegin. "I just purchased A a new
car and "was beginning to learn to run
it. It was my beginning' le'sson. and,
being a newi hand, I' may, -have, run
faster than the law. allows. In, ad
dition to' that, it is the first time I was
ever arrested." \u25a0 ;.,.'-. : .. .-'.\u25a0'.
;"Your. : name and : your- .experience
blend .^harmoniously," : , reip^rked^' the
court, "so I will give you j chance to
begin driving again and see' if you can
do better, i The case is dismissed.". \u25a0 ;\u25a0"
are linked together. The :
Teasbri is that at ; a period \u25a0'
when a kiri's digestion isy
;; ? ;.--.;- '\u25a0 > .'- ..-. .M/ i'S'^
prorides ittvtt-paweiM
Tttrarishment in > :Jeaaffly/.; ; cB- ! -
\u25a0 :/- , r -y*' 1
iKsJjtre -food that bilds^
i; kWep<s up a : gir V s^
NATIONAL OFFICIAL
VISITS OIL FIELDS
George Otis Smith Says Ad=
ministration Desires to Have
Remedial Laws Passed
."Georg-e Otis Smiths-director of the
geological survey, arrived in. San vFran-"
Cisco yesterday | after an extended trip
through the oil fields' "He . visited the
Kern ,river, Sunset, Midway, : McKit
trick, the . Lost hills and Coalinga. ] The
tour was taken' for the purpose of
gaining^more ; intimate; knowledge of
actual; conditions.. v" \u25a0-"\u25a0
"We are\ all" desirous," said "the dir
rector last evening, "of bringing about
some ;rem'edial j legislation. • _The oil
operators want'iti and we , in Washing
ton are "anxious to .' My
itrip .; was -undertaken not for any spe
cific- inquiry, but : ratherNto acquire
fuller information so as to be the bet
ter; prepared to deal with, the problem.
"I have, not ,gly en special heed to
the 7 , workings of the Yard decision, to
which objection has been" raised. That
line of research-was covered by Mr.
Pierce," assistant "secretary of the
terior. We feel,. though, that the more
information we have on the general
of, the -oil^nfeasures,. the more
"satisfactorily we can; deal with it.
VrjVlt'is not the policy of the govern
ment to "lock up its resources nor. to
impose onerous obligations.". We are
following out the policies outlined by
President Taft in" his St.. Paul speech,
in whtch ; he> said that it was the in
tention \u25a0Of; the government to apply
'conservation for the general benefit of
the people and not for the purpose'of
amassing revenue." . '
r Smith expressed his astonishment at
the: extent of the petroleum deposits.
He said that >he "had seen much of un
usual interest during his excursion.
v It ..was '"Director Smith who reported
adversely' on the city's claims to the
Hetch Hetchy^valley. He was not pre
pared to discuss I the, water topic last
evening, "asserting that ; he .had not
recently been concerned- with it.
Dr., and Mrs.; William
Boericke. have 'returned
to their home, in • Wash
ington street after a
visit of several days at
Paso'RobLes.and farther
south. Miss Dorothy
Boericke; is'. 1 having a
delightful time in <Ham
ilton, Canada, where she
is the gueSt of friends.
She has been entertained
'at. a series of luncheon
and dinner "parties. Miss
Boericke will pass the
holidays In New York,
and will not return'un
til the spring.
\u25a0\u25a0,? ' ' ' .' ••- • \u25a0
Mr. and Mrs. Charles
H. Schlacks have been
entertained at several
recent affairs of social
importance, and among
these affairs none was
more enjoyable than the
dinner given for them
by Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Irving Bentley at the St.
Francis.
• . * '. *
The younger girls are
enjoying a round -of
gayety this week and
have planned any num
ber of teas and lunch
eons to while away the
hours. Miss Lillian Van
Vorst, who lately re
turned from abroad with
her mother, Mrs. Caro
line Van Vorst, enter
tained at an elaborate
tea yesterday at the St.
F rancis for nearly , half
a hundred of the younger
crowd. This afternoon
Miss Amalla Simpson
will entertain at a,' tea
in, her home for almost
a like number of friends.
\u25a0\u25a0'"• \u25a0 >\u25a0 \u25a0 •V:*'-':.;
Senator and . 'I Mr g;
Francis " G. NewlandV,'
who are visiting^ here
from Nevada, ar e - being
entertained at^ a" round
of dinner and luncheon
parties. An elaborate
dinner was given 'at the
Fairmont for the vis
itors by Frank Michaels.
- Mrs, B. S. Douglass,
wife of Lieutenant Com
mander. Douglass, of the
California, is being en
tertained by the service
set during her visit in
town as the guest of
Dr> and Mrs. R. E. Eb
ersole. ' O .. • -- .
Smith was, the guest of honor at a
dinner at the Palace hotel last night,
given by the Engineering and Matal
lurgical society.rx* He spoke on. con
servation! He said: , '..
. Almost every, summer for 15
years: I have been coming to the
Pacific coast for the purpose of
seeing things through my own ,
eyes, and this trip, though a hur
ried one, is no exception to that
rule. Inasmuch as it Is not the
- political but the economic situa
tion that I am concerned in. I came
this, year after election rather than
1 before. r ,
For 30 years the United States
geological survey has tried to do
Its part in the development of the
west and today we realize that we
face, problems never more deserv
ing of attention nor more difficult
of solution. I say this not as a
pessimist; but as an optimist, real
izing as I do the widespread Inter- \u25a0
est you men of California are tak
ing in the matter of proposed legis
lation.
With you I appreciate also that
legislation is not the whole answer
to this country's ; economic ques
tions. Legislative enactments are
necessarily restrictive or prohibi
tive of abuse, and your experience
as engineers has shown you many
times how much more effective
than legislation is the creative
work that furnishes : the remedy
through the operation of natural
law.. ' ' - . :. ~~.- .
MINISTER COMMITS SUICIDE— AIta. la.. Not.
22.— Rer. J. O. . Ktndstrom, pastor of the
\u25a0 Swedish Lutheran church here, killed himself,
cutting his throat with a razor this mornirg.
'"It Is belle-yed he was Insane. ;"/»;•;
. .It is surely good business to entertain your enstomen ~u " f •'
by a spin through the country or an Thi* monozram on the §» ;
I No Excuse for Doing Without a Motor Car N |
Lots of men who ought to do not own automo- — — ; :—: — M
|| biles. One man says that prices are too high, Bay Xny Car You Want 1
| j /another man says that he could not drive a*
a car and take care of it, another that he • But Buy a CAR 5
~ : could not maintain it. ;%•--'•: ;Y:; Y: -- s . , -1/
IX7 1 A t_ 'c 'm. »r.t- j ' We . ask you before making S&
H i We say to the first man ; There are good cars to yo * ur fo^ dedsion to give the i %
be had at, moderate prices. Count the value of the Chalmers "Forty" an unpreju-
% car in -the' serviceit will render you in business, diced examination. If you decide |s
I I pleasure and he a lth..Not : on; t h e basis of its price ZZS£%Z£«££££Z'- I
.alone. Ask those *of your acquaintances who are you become a motor enthusiast, p.
owners v qf cars their opinion, and you cannot help you will learn from observation,
but'arrive at the conclusion— expenditure for an and from your talks with other -^
I\u25a0 • , aufemobile ; is money well invested \u25a0.; - '. ! $
- ; We say v to, the second man: The modern, pert ec- a high position it holds in the %
ted automobile is a wonderful piece of mechanism, automobile world. You wm learn ||
I P^^^^^P^P^p^^l mSs/itd^: fcef ' I \
H : sight|to.see.a : woman at the ;. wheel. of a big touring the day wm come when yoa mil H
V ; car, guiding it through the city streets; as for caring recognize it as the greatest car in > y
|* ? it,Cthis;am^nts^to -little more 'than keeping it world at anywhere near. :w: w ||
supplied with gasoline and oil; its price.
% ; Glidden Tour of 1910 was a remarkable example lof what The Chalmers "Forty" has
a car, win do with little or no attention. Several cars after the beauty and grace of the most
traveling over twenty-eight hundred and fifty-one miles of the' expensive cars. It has the
v roughest possible iroada, finished in goodT condition. A Chal- PO'w M compete wath the
mer scar won the Tour. - w'.' - speediest on the level or on the
1 Il^ll^iiplSa^g sS-^ s it
'.:ently without. unusual expense.^^ All kinds of figures could ; * " *
1 be r submittedToh . this f point,' but what iis the. use? Do you You can pay more for a car j.S
v ;,know^ oneVman 7 who ever gave :up a motor~car because it cost but you will find it difficult to ,y:, y:
v -him too much to keep ?/- , > : J *': \ buy any better service, more • «|
\u25a0', The man you see riding in the in a motor car is not ; comfort, ot greater satisfaction M
-always out forpleasure r alone: With a motor^ car you can com- ; than you can get in a Chalmers . ||
.;r bme;busmess ; a)idjpleasure. jltTis 1 surely tgood business to -"Forty -at 52750.
V : -. ' ';' entertain your customers^ and prospective customers by a.spin We are always glad to explain
: Icountry; or ;anf^afternoon" on the golf links. Any. in detail every ; feajture of .the
i : i-good car caiiibe;madeitoJp^y i for.atself> : inVa,'strictly > basiries3- cars and demonstrate them on it-- :
\u25a0/.:. way," by saving; timer cutting^down -'distances and- getting:in the road. Call and examine' the .
v -" closer relationship" with' your business associates. 1 911 models.
I pioneer Automobile company || ill
v ban rrancisco, Cal. 7^
CHALMERS MOTOR COMPANY, Detroit, Michigan, U. S. A.
ENTRANCES
GRANT AVENUE SUITER STREET * ' * POST-STRSXT
Hi^\.v»tLi 1 Iv-/iN/\l_i Vr\ l_< \J ILO
t~» • a XT y^» V"/ T\T T~^ \IO
;• C HZ\ |\| I V I 1 |\J H \!
X . xTI 1 t| V-^ X l jxL \ I -i 1 >| KjJ
50 DOZEN EMBROIDERED SCARFS WITH LACE EDGE AND INSER-
50 DOZEN EMBROIDERED SCARFS WITH LACE EDGE AND INSER-
r ; ; ; tion ; 1 8"x54", $2.25 each
35 DOZEN SCALLOPED EDGE SCARFS WITH LACE INSERTION:
18"x45", 51.50 each
35 DOZEN SCALLOPED EDGE SCARFS WITH LACE INSERTION'
/ 18"x54", $1.75 each
50 DOZEN 24-INCH ROUND CENTER PIECES; EMBROIDERED ANT
' LACE EDGE, «pJL-EACH
25 DOZEN 30-INCH ROUND CENTER PIECES; EMBROIDERED^ ANI
LACE EDGE, $1.50 EACH
20 DOZEN 36-INCH ROUND CENTER PIECES; SCALLOPED EDGE AND
• INSERTION, $1.50 EACH
50 DOZEN 30-INCH FILET SQUARES, 50^ EACH
HAND EMBROIDERED MADEIRA GOODS; ALSO
2g ! FRENCH CLUNY IN ALL SIZES
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES
V SUTTER- GRANT AVE-ahd POST STS..
FISHINSEASON
A Choice Selection for the
ThankssriTincr. Dinner Fish Course
\u25a0 j « :
Salmon 1 is sdarce this week and,
consequently, high in price, and. at
the same time, 'being 1 out of season,
it is of poor, quality.
"Wholesale prices today for fish in
season:
Whltefish, bake or fry . 3e
Soles, fry. 5c
Sand-dabs, fry 7c
Baracuda, bake or boll 8c
Tomcod. fry Te
Cod, bake, boll or «tew. ........ 6c
USE CALL WANTS— THERE'S A REASON: SUCCESS
Dr. Chuck Sai
Tbe Celebrated Chinssa Bert SpscfaOst
1514 OTAEBELL ST^ S. F.
• Our famous Chinese Baros
yg^PS^^gv will pasitlrely cere all
Atf%?ff?;^P> Stomach. Lous. Hetrt. Liv-
H^eßS^bcS * r » Kidney, Rheumatism.
g^*"^ Asthaa. Catarrh aad Fe-
FT n .male troubles; all the Blood.
Hml jp*\ v Skis, prtrat* aad chronic
JSL i^* 4 Cs^ W diseases ot both I sexes.
Us i fl neer > Appendicitis cared
Vl / ' A^y^j^ without the use of the
\ Onr Natlre Herbs
\tegFi^a» mre harmless and never
tW^SI fall - Ofac « hours 10 a -
BJ^mrJ§r\ m - to J ~ m ** Ita9 p. zn. ;
VK^^ &&&_ San. 10 a. ex. to 3 p. ta.
Amerlcaa lady atteaiiiat.
ConanUntlon fn»».
7

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