OCR Interpretation


The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 18, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1912-04-18/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE CALL LEADS IN
POLITICAL ftllllffi
THEATRICAL lil I Hill
REAL ESTATE 111 ■■ Iflf V
SPORTING 111 I If If X
COMMERCIAL |1 | I| I
SOCIETY Will
FINANCIAL " ™ " ■
y A cxi.—no. 140.
All Titanic Survivors On Carpathia
RESCUE STEAMER TO REACH N. Y. TONIGHT
WHITE STAR
WITHHELD
WRECK
NEWS
Official of Cunard Line Says Ti»
tank Owners Knew Ship
Had Sunk at 10 a. m.
Monday
REPORT OF DISASTER
GIVEN OUT AT 7 P. M.
Vice President Franklin Denies
Charge, but Accuser Sticks
to His Tale of Delayed
Account
• \!\Speclat Dispatch. 4o The Call]
c IV I offices of the White Star line
•-' IXI office * of tlie White Star line
• ijL* l| Vice President Franklin was)
cl% " much disturbed this afternoon t
*". because of insistent reports that the j
White Star agents knew of the sinking!
* of the Titanic many hours before they j
» % allowed the news to become public. ,
* *- In* , the most emphatic terms /Franklin :
declared such reports were unqualified
* end false. - t
. Still the rumors would not down,
and Franklin, was' at last informed that:
Thomas B. .Stead, an official of the;
«, Canard line, had told several news- j
j
paper men the sinking of the Titanic ;
•, was. known- in New York as early as
c lO o'clock Monday morning, though it
• ' was not announced at the White Star;
.' office until 7 o'clock that evening.
. Sent for Stead '•
'v . Franklin asked General Agent Sum-j
ncr of the Cunard line to send Stead i
to Franklin's office. There the news-
I * paper men confronted Stead, and, with I
!• pale face and trembling lips, he ad
| mitted he had told newspaper men the)
sinking of the ship was known," but I
• denied he .had said or intimated that j
the White Star officials knew it. -
* .*'«'■■' "A very close friend of mine, whose
name I can not Teveal, a man of high
standing in the , business world."' said;
Stead; "told me Tuesday morning that
• at 10 c o'clock Monday he had received
definite word -that the Titanic had sunk I
several hours before.
4 Friend Told Him
*"I asked him if he knew the lnfor-'
'••. iration to be authentic, and he said he
] did*'"'Because of his standing , and his
. . affiliations I had another reason to be
% ])pvp that he spoke the truth, and bo I
told you gentlemen" (pointing to the
reporter*).
"But I did not may the White Star
• line knej* , . My friend is not connected
~\ ■with the line.".added Stead hurriedly,
■while Franklin, transfixed him with a
glare. . 'I wowld. not think of saying
„ that the White Star Irne deceived the
• . public." .' . - '.'; -
4 His Former Story
, Franklin dismissed Stead, who as
sured h>kn as he left he was ready "to
make a statement of any kind that you I
* desire from me, Franklin."
The facts are that Stead, in telling
his story to several reporters Tuesday,
added to his admissions to Franklin
by the statement that he "knew" the
• "White Star had been given the same
information that the' mysterious friend
had received. When asked where this
friend was. Stead said today he had
"gone w«st on a sudden call."
ITAFT STILL HAS
• J- HOPE FOR BUTT
■ '. ■■ ..■. :,... .- • ■•--■;-■ -;■ ....•, :■ - ,■■;
■ - ; ' ■■ -',■ '~' ■-. "■ .■ , ' - ■';■■"-" ■ :'
President Telegraphs Aid's
Relatives That He Has
Not Lost Heart.
WASHINGTON. April 17.—President
Taft tonight told friends he still was
hoping that Major Archibald Butt,- his
military aid, might have been saved
from the wreck of the Titanic.
The continued 1 . lack of news of the
1 major today carried the hopes of the
president still lower, but Taft thinks
■> that with the arrival of the Carpathia
tomorrow something might be learned.
The president telegraphed to Major
™ Butt's relatives today that he still was
t fccplqg- for favorable news. • .
THE San Francisco CALL
DORR ARRESTED
IN STOCKTON FOR
MARSH MURDER
"I've Come Back to Face the
Music," Says Prisoner to
Police Chief
[Special Dispatch lo The. Call]
STOCKTON, April 17.—"I've come
back to face the music," said William
A. Dorr, the Stocktonian accused of the
murder of George E. Marsh, the mil
lionaire soap manufacturer of Lynn,
Mass., when taken into custody here at
9:20 o'clock tonight by Chief of Police
Briare, Detective Donahue and Pa
trolman Gayou.
The authorities had been watching
for him for 24 hours. Chief Briare had
every entrance to the city guarded, in
case Dorr, whom he had every reason
to believe was hiding in Stockton,
should attempt to < scape.
Policemen remained at the house of
Orpha Marsh at 1023 North Center
street, expecting that Dorr might call
there. At 6 o'clock this evening Dorr
telephoned the Marsh residence. Miss
Gillis, a neighbor, answered the phone
and immediately recognized Dorr's
voice. He said he wanted to talk with
Miss Marsh, but refused to say who he
was. Dorr told Miss Gillis It was a
case of life and death with him.
Miss Gillis said that Miss Marsh was
Continued on Page 10, Culuinn 5
SAN FRANCISCO. THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1912.
APRIL 15, 19K2
BODIES IN DEEP SEA FOREVER
WATER ACTS LIKE IRON GRIP
BALTIMORE, Md.. April 17.—-"The bodies of the victims of the
Titanic are at the bottom of the deep, never to leave it," said Prof.
Robert W. Wood of the chair of experimental physics of Johns Hop
kins university, today. "It is altogether improbable that any bodies
ever will return to the surface as in the case with bodies drowned in
shallow water.
"At the depth of two miles the pressure of the water is something
like 6,000 pounds to the square inch, which is far too great to be over
come by buoyancy ordinarily given drowned bodies by the gases gen
erated in them.
"That the bodies sank to the bottom of the sea there is no question.
The Titanic's victims who were not carried down with the boat followed
until the very bottom of the sea was reached. There was no such thing
as their stopping in their downward course a half mile, a mile, or at
any other point.
"Great changes necessarily have been wrought in the vessel itself
by the enormous pressure to which it has been subjcted. No effect was
produced on any portion, compartment or room to whose inside as well
as outside walls the water had access. In such instances the pressure
from one side neutralized that from the other.
"But wherever there was an airtight or watertight compartment
the 6,000 pounds to a square inch pressure of water has crumpled these
walls as if they were tissue paper."
DOMESTIC BRAWL IS
FATAL TO OLD WOMAN
Witness of Street Fight Dies of
Heart Failure
SANTA BARBARA, April 17.—A street
fight between a man and his wife so
frightened Mrs. Ilefugla Gutierrez, aged
70, at her home at 230 East Montecito
street last night that she suffered a
stroke of heart failure and died. .1. D.
Castleberry and his wife were the inno
cent, though belligerent, cause of Mrs.
Gutierrez's death.
1915 FAIR COMMISSIONER
REPORTED TO BE DYING
R. C. Rogers Suffers Relapse
After Operation j
SANTA BARBARA, April 17.—Robert
Cameron Rogers, who wrote the words
to "The Rosary, , ' and who is a member
of the world's fair commission ap
pointed by Governor Johnson, is re
ported to be dying at a local hospital.
Rogers was stricken with appendicitis
ago. - -, «
DOCTOR DODGE
AMONG RESCUED
ON CARPATHIA
San Francisco Assessor and
Family Located on the
Relief Vessel
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
NSW YORK, April 17.—Nathan Vida
ver, a brother in law of Dr. Washing
ton Dodge of San Francieco, said to
The Call representative here late to
day that Washington Dodge, Mrs.
Dodge and their 4 year old son were
safe on board the Carpathia.
"While some New York papers re
ported him as among those who were
missing, I am glad to notify his friends
through The Call that Dodge is safe,"
said Vidaver.
Vidaver, who is the brother of Mrs.
Dodge, said that he would entertain
the Dodge family at his residence in
this city until they recuperated from
the shock of the terrible disaster and
were able to continue their journey to
San Francisco.
Vidaver will meet Dodge and his
family at the dock when the Carpathia
arrives, and will be the first to con
gratulate him on his escape from the 111
fated steamer.
Vidaver lias been using every effort
to ascertain the safeiy of Dodge from
the White Star officials, and Jt was not
until late this afternoon that they gave
out positive assurance that Dodge and
COMtlnue4 oa Page 4, Colons a
y^ r : - >
4 vi THEWEA%HER
y + %£§TERDAY — ffigWf temperature, 64;
-rbo/iy— Fair,- /igfc/
souf/i winds, changing to moderate west.
For Det&ili of the Weather See Page 13
Millionaires Lost
1,312 Are Missing
Hopes Shattered
Story of the Terrible Disaster and
Of the Sacrifices Made By the
. Victims Anxiously Is Awaited
Plan Made to Take Care of the
Rescued When They Arrive in
Gotham After Awful Experience
NEW YORK, April 18.—Beyond even th e mystery of
how the Titanic met its fate another mystery evolved by
the events of the last thsee days forced itself to the front
last night. Although the rescue ship Carpathia was within
the zone of wireless communication for hours during the
night and both shore stations and relaying ships were able
to- obtain from it long lists of survivors among the steer*
age passengers and to send and receive numerous short mes
sages! from and to private individuals, not a word of matter
descriptive oi the manner in whickthe Titanic received its
death blow or how those oh board the doomed liner com
ported themselves in the face of impending death reached* '•
the shore.
4 L, . 1 *—♦
NEW YORK, April 17.—The roll of the saved from the Titanic
disaster tonight seems complete.
Practically every attending circumstance in the trans
mission of news from the Carpathia goes to show that only 328
of the 610 cabin passengers of the Titanic are safe on the rescue
ship.
The 282 cabin passengers whose names- have not appeared in
the lists sent ashore yesterday by wireless probably must be con
ceded among the 1,312 believed to be dead.
I Thousands of hopeful hearts were turned to despair when the
United States scout cruiser Chester sent a wireless dispatch- late
today that it had been in communication with the Carpathia and
had asked repeatedly for the full list of the first, and second cabin
survivors, and that the rescue ship reported that all the names had
already been sent ashore.
! The other 540 persons saved were passengers in the steerage
or members of the crew.
After the strain of three days' waiting without news of their ,
missing ones, there were a few of the hopeful who still held out o
tonight against the seemingly final word as to the fate of friends and
relatives.
The small remaining hope of the few who persistently refused
to believe the worst rested tonight on'the faint possibility that the
list of survivors sent by wireless from the Carpathia.might qot, be
quite complete.
From the Carpathia, which was approximately 600 miles from
New York this morning and which is expected, if it keeps up its rate
of progress of 13 knots an hour, to reach the entrance of the harbor
at about 8 o'clock tomorrow night, came a new report during the
day as to the number of survivors on board.
Through the Cunarder Franconia, which established "wireless
communication with the rescue ship, came a message which included
this statement:
"Carpathia has a total of 705 survivors aboard."
The previous statement from the Carpathia had been that it
carried 868 survivors. It may be that the report received through
the Franconia included a count of rescued passengers only, disregard
ing the 100 or more members of the crew who must have been in
the boats which the Carpathia picked up.
Communication was being had with the Carpathia tonight
through both the scout cruiser and the shore wireless station at
Siasconsett. Through the Chester there began coming slowly the
names of the saved passengers from i =
the third cabin of the Titanic.
The sending of these only helped to
c'onflrm the belief that there were no i
mbre names of first and second cabin I
passengers to send. And thus there >
was left hardly a possibility that the
names of well known men such as John
Jacob Astor. William T. Stead, Isidor
Straus, Benjamin Guggenheim, and
other notables could have been omitted ,
in the transmission of names.
FAMOUS MEN LO*T
That these nien had gone down with I
the ship there remained hardly a doubt.
Authorities on conditions off the banks
agreed that recues of passengers not j
taken from the liner by the boats would •
have to be made speedily, as exposure {
and exhaustion would sap quickly the
life of human beings forced to resort j
to any other means than boats of keep
ing afloat.
During the early evening hours the
CoatUm*« *n Pas* X Celueui l '
PRICE FH r E CENTS.
ROYAL ||
NESTOR
Original London & Cairo
Cigarettes I
lOforlZ^
iGI (o7 CALIFORNIA ST. I

xml | txt