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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, April 20, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1912-04-20/ed-1/seq-1/

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JUNIOR
SECTION
ISSUED EVERY SATURDAY FOR THE BOYS AND GIRLS OF SAN FRANCISCO AND CALIFORNIA
SECOND STORY TELLING GREAT SUCCESS
BOYS AND GIRLS
FILL BIG HALL
Mrs. Eric K. Olsen Again Holds
Juniors Spellbound With
Magic of Her Tales
The boys and girls who came to
the story idling , party given last
Saturday by The Junior Call to
the children of San Francisco had
a splendid time. Ask them.
This is the second of a series oi
stury telling parties which The
Junior lias planned to give, the
first having , taken place last
month at Scottish Rite temple.
That the initial event Was a great
success was attested by the en-
Uiusiasft! with which the news of
the second party was greeted.
Do/ens of inquiries were made by
telephone and through the mail as
to where the affair would be
given, and at what time, and anx
ious Juniors made their prepara
tions accordingly.
The big Mission Turnverein hall
offered a splendid setting for the
throng of children ami their enter
tainers, and the first comers gath
ered as early as 1 o'clock, though
the doors were not to open until
2 o'clock. Out on the steps they
camped close up to the great iron
barred entrance that blocked the
way. At opening time there was
a wild race up the two flights of
stairs that separated them from
the main auditorium. The best
runners won the right of way and
got the front seats.
At the top of the stairway the
boys and girls were met by a re
ception committee composed of
the members of the editorial staff
of the Grant school, which edited
The Junior that Saturday. The
welcoming squad was under the
supervision of Fred Ritchie, the
editor in chief, and each child was
presented with a copy of the
Grant school number of The Jun
ior Call, which bore on its front
page the entire program for the
afternoon.
At 2:30 o'clock the appearance
on the stage of Mrs. Eric K. Ol
sen, whose tales have endeared
her to The Junior boys and girls
of the city, was the signal for
quiet. Mrs. Olsen's first story was
"Old Pipes and the Dryad." This
was followed by a piano solo
played by Stefan Vucosavlievich,
and then came the second story,
which was called "The Five Chi
nese Brothers."
After this the big audience was
entertained for 10 minutes by
Artist James Navoni, whose
clever"lectures of Alonzo and The
Pup brought forth many a laugh
from the youngsters. Then came
the last story of the day, "Mik
kel." Mikkel was a little Norwe
gian boy, and his adventures held
the boys and girls enthralled un
til the last words had fallen from
Mrs. Olsen's lips. Then they
clapped loud and long, like the
enthusiastic Juniors that they
were.
Altogether it was a must suc
cessful party and The Junior was
as well pleased as were the boys
and (firls who partook 61 its hos
pitality.
THE San Francisco CALL
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., SATI K DAY, APRIL 20, I'M 2.
ALONZO IS BUSIEST DOG IN TOWN
ALONZO Urges the Pup to Battle
§@ds©ifii
JUNIOR BOW WOW
TELLS HIS WOES
Denounces Muzzle Ordinance
and Declares for f : ree
Speech
The Junior Call, Third and
Market streets, San Francisco.
Saturday. April 20, y>l2.
Good mofilinjf, boys and girls!
You will notice that every
chance I get 1 send you a letter.
The editor has so much to talk
about nowadays that it's pretty
hard to get a word in edgewise,
but once in a while I succeed.
Tin , re's nothing like perseverance,
you know.
I have been very much upset
about this muzzle business any
way, and really have felt in no
mood f> write letterspr anything"
eUe. It's hard enough for a dog
to make himself understood with
out having his mouth lied up so
he can't speak at all. Between
you and me, I haven't been aide
to bark since the ordinance was
passed. Now, what d'ye think of
that?
Last week I made a brand new
friend. 11 is name is Dingo, and
he is the mascot of the Grant
school. His boys and girls edited
The Junior for last Saturday, and
I'ingo had a picture of himself and
a sketch of his life in the paper.
We had quite a serious conversa
tion in regard to the muzzle out
rage. Ife declared that something
should be done at once, and T
agreed with him.
Last Saturday I understand you
made the acquaintance of Artist
Xavoni at the story telling party.
]Ie is the man who draws pic
tures of me and The Pup. He's
almost as good as a photographer
and not half so cross—never kicks
us around.
You will notice that with this
issue the writing contest will be
discontinued. We have lots of
good story writers among the
Juniors, but T think they must be
taking a rest. Our showing of
letters received for the last three
weeks is very poor indeed. The
puzzle department seemed to be
as popular as ever, however, and
the painting contest always draws
a large number of amateur artists.
So let's see what you can do with
them this week.
I went to Berkeley the other
day to see what the gardeners in
the Berkeley Garden City were
doing with themselves, and my!
they're the busiest boys and girls
I ever did see. They work as
though they actually liked it. One
boy offered me a cabbage if I
could carry it home, but it was
too big. for me to handle; then,
besides, mother doesn't like cab
bage soup.
. Now, boys and girls, keep your
wits bright. Enter the contests
and see if you can't win a prize
or two. Let's see if we can't make
The Jfltnior < 'all the best juvenile
in the west. ALOXZO.

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