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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, October 10, 1912, Image 1

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Number of Sports Items in Yesterdays
CALL Chronk-1c...... 41
-4- 8 Examiner 44
Both Quantity and Qua/ity in The Call.
VOLUMi: CXIL—NO. 132.
DEADLOCK IN
ELEVENTH
INNING
Red Sox and Giants Battle Until
Darkness Prevents Any
Further Play
OUTCOME IS A JOLT TO
CONFIDENT BOSTONIANS
Stahl's Famed Outfield Makes a
Poorer Showing Than in
First Game
NEW YORKERS MAKE A
GAME UPHILL FIGHT
TIE ELECTRIFIES FANS
BOSTON STILL IN LEAD
Score . • o to 6
When two baseball teams of
the international fame, supremacy
and fighting efficiency of the Bos
ion Red Sox and New York
Giants siiuggle for 1 I innings to
defeat each other and are
stopped, deadlocked, 6 to 6, only
by darkness, the world stands still
and watches them.
Christy Mathewson, the hope
of the Giants, single handed held
the team that had won the day
before at New York — held it
against two younger pitchers,
Collins and Hall.
The errors of Fletcher of the
Giants — whose mitt seemed
greased, he dropped so many
balls — probably cost the Goth
amiies a victory. Had "M.atty"
been giver, the support his team
gave Tesreau Tuesday, the score
in games this morning would be
one all.
New York fans take gladly
the short end of all bets offered
on the Red Sox for the series.
Will Mrs. New York Fan have
to forego her winter furs ?
Boston still "has the edge."
PATRICK GALLAGHER
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
FENWAY PARK, BOSTON. Oct. 9.—-
From their coign of vantage un
der the shelter of the fence
around this capacious ball
rk, where patiently they had waited
I night, more than 1.500 shivering,
at still enthusiastic fans, saw the sun
M over the back bay fens.
Like a huge and overripe orange
ooked Old Sol. cupped by a dun bank
•f threatening clouds —promise of rain
or, at best, a dark day. Darkness
stopped the game with 11 innings
I'layed and the score tied in the elev
inning.
Boston's peculiar climate flirted with
fans and with the teams. As the
UM grew toward midday, the air
■I its crispness and gained in stuffi
lamminess. Flashes of bright
r ess were succeeded by lingering in
■ als of scmigloom, with a few heavy
ashes of rain to keep the gathered
housands on the anxious seat.
%}"> c Jolts Bostoncse
tie score of the second game
ii the world's scries was not antici
ted by the Boston ball crowd. The
is offered against McGraw's men
gthened from 10 to 8 to 10 to 6. New
rkers who accompanied the teams
from Manhattan in the train which ar
f-re last night in two sections
epted tb«*t r>']ds liberally.
nthusiasm, good nature and be
lief in the capacity of their favorites.
-c was little to choose between to
day's crowd at Fenway park and that
which watched the sensational close
uf the gate in New York on Tuesday
\» lien Joe Wood proved himself Joe, the
■ t Killer.
53 noise; or to be more
;• urate, the noise was of a
more graduated, euphonious sort—Bos
ton'a way.
When the gates were opened at the
rk there were approximately 20,rtf>0
pie already in their places. Quick
tlie remainder of the seats filled
Ml you could not have wedged in an
i tional spectator when, the horn*
im i-traggled out on the diamond to
win the customary ovation.
Cheers Impartial
fre could be no doubt of Boston's
n the defenders of the home
urn. Big and hearty were the
for Wood—who gave an exhi
lon of some fancy long flics —for
Speaker, for Stahl and Collins of the
deadly left hand. Nor were there
* t <>v t tnucd oa Page », Column 7 '
THE San Francisco CALL
'Boston Ahead! Fine'
Murmurs Patient,
'Now Let Me Sleep'
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 9—
Harry Coon, aged 21, a hotel
clerk, was injured this afternoon
in a runaway. For an hour he
lay unconscious at the receiving
hospital while physicians sought
to bring him back to life. As he
opened his eyes he turned to the
nurse and asked her the score.
She told him Boston was ahead,
and he relapsed into uncon
ciousness, satisfied.
Chemist Finds Way
To Silence Alarm
Clock of Farmer
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SANTA MONICA, Oct. 9.—No longer
will the silk stocking brigade resid
ing in the exclusive residence district
be bothered by the cock's crow at sun
rise, for A. J. Weinland, a retired
chemist residing in Ocean avenue, has
manufactured a concoction which on
being fed to roosters prevents them
from crowing. According to Wein
land, his preparation contains only in
gredients that are harmless to the
birds, while putting an effective stop to
the early morning call.
MRS. EDDY'S BIG TRUST
DECLARED VOID BY COURT
$2,000,000 Involved in Suit May
Be Taken by Two Heirs
BOSTON, Oct. 9.—A trust, estimated
at $2,000,000, created by the will of
Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy founder of the
Christian Science church, for the bene
fit of the denomination, was declared
void by the Massachusetts supreme
court today.
The court holds, however, that a
charitable trust has been created and
that new trustees may be appointed
to administer it.
The trust was to have been adminis
tered by the directors of the Mother
church in Boston, but the court decided
that the trust provisions were nulli
fied under the statute limiting the
amount of the income from bequests 10
religious organizations to ?2,000 an
nually.
The court dismissed the bill brought
by the contestants of the will, who
alleged that the teachings of Chris
tian Science were against public pol
icy. The contestants are given 30 days
in which to bring additional evidence
to support their claims.
The court holds that the action of
the attorney general in becoming a
party to the suit gives George W.
Glover, the son of Mrs. Eddy, and
Ebenezer J. Foster Eddy, her stepson,
a standing, because it is possible the
heirs may take the property.
WIFE URGES HENRY TO
TAKE HIS PUNISHMENT
"Lord" Convicted on Second
Charge of Embezzlement
OAKLAND, Oct. 9.—"Lord" Thomas
B. Henry, convicted today for the sec
ond time within a month on a felony
charge, and scheduled to go to trial
on a third tomorrow, probably will
drop his appeal from his first con
viction and begin serving the three
year term which has been imposed.
A verdict of guilty was reached to
day six minutes after the jury retired.
The charge was embezzling $200 from
Abraham Stockett, a negro, in a mort
gage transaction.
When the verdict was read, Mrs.
Henry, who was present with a baby
:; weeks old and a child of 3 years,
broke down and cried. Assistant Dis
trict Attorney Hynes, who conducted
the prosecutions, attempted to comfort
her. Mrs. Henry urged her husband
to abandon further resistance.
FIRE ENDANGERS LIVES
OF TENEMENT DWELLERS
Half Hundred Leap From Win
dows to Safety
Fire broke out at Eighteenth and
Hampshire streets, at 2 o'clock this
morning and forced more than 50 per
sons to leap from second and third
I story windowjf of a tenement structure
'to save their lives. Several were in
jured.
The fire started in the livery stable
of David Dc Martini, scavenger for
the fire department. Before the blaze
was controlled it partially destroyed
the stable, burned to death eight horse*;,
and burned down a three story tene
ment.
The loss is estimated at ffi.QOO.
DEATH COMMUTES
CONVICT'S SENTENCE
San Francisco Prisoner Drowns
at Folsom While Bathing
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 9.— E. A. Weitzel,
a convict sentenced to Folsom prison
from San Francisco for passing a ficti
tious check, was drowned In the dam at
the prison this afternoon while in swim
ming. Weitzel had been working with
a gang of other prisoners, and after
their work ended they all went In swim
ming. Weitzel did pot tell the others h«
could not swim, and when he went be
yond his depth he perished .
SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1912.
Ohio Exposition Commission Is Welcomed
Cordial Greeting Pleases Governor Harmon
! Captain C. A. Cove, V. 5. N.. commandant at Coat island, receiving Gov fudson Harmon and Mrs. Harmon as iTtey stepped ashore at training station. \
IDAHO SUPREME
COURT EXCLUDES
T. R. ELECTORS
Presidential Ticket Has No Right j
to Be Represented on
State Ballot
LEWISTOWN, Idaho, Oct. 9.—The de
cision of the Idaho supreme court,
handed down here, which will prevent
the names of the progressive party
electors and candidates for congress
man at large from appearing on the
official ballot, was based on the
court's determination of the term "con
vention."
The court held that "a mass assem
blage of self-appointed delegates" did
not constitute a legal convention,
which, according to the decision, must
conform to the representative principle
with the delegates chosen by some
"recognized class, body or party."
The progressive electors were named
at a state mass assemblage in St. An
thony, and also by petition. The court
held that neither method was lawful,
declaring that under the statute the
candidates should have been designated
by the state central committee, since
the progressive party did not enter the
primaries or hold a representative state
convention, the alternative procedures
prescribed in the code.
m
FIREMAN SAVES CHILD
AS LOCOMOTIVE SPEEDS
From Pilot He Tosses Boy Aside
With Foot
SIOT'X CITY, lowa, Oct. 9- Milo C.
Dodge, fireman on the Milwaukee
railroad, saved the life of Gerald Al
lard, two year old son of J. Allard, a
South Dakota farmer, today by crawl
ing out on the pilot while the train
was runing IS miles an hour, and
with his foot knocking the child from
the track as the train sped by.
MAN SENTENCED FOR
ATTEMPT TO KILL KING
Victor Emmanuel's Assailant to
Serve Thirty Years
HOME, Oct. 3,—For attempting to
assassinate King Victor Emmanuel
March 14 last, Antonio Palba today
was condemned to SO years* penal
servitude-
Governor Harmon shaking hands with a Chinese child whom he met at
Coat island.
Amid Elaborate Ceremony Distinguished Party
Will Select Fait Site for Buckeye State
Governor judson Harmon of Ohio, his three associate members of the
Ohio exposition commission and six members of his personal staff arc the
guests of San Francisco, having arrived in this city yesterday morning for the
purpose of selecting the site for the building of the Buckeye state at the
Continued on Page 3, Column 2
GOULD PREDICTS
PROSPERITY FOR US
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
SANTA BARBARA, Oct. 9.— Edwin
Gould, accompanied by Norman E. Det
man, D. H. Morris and A. H. Morris,
three New York associates, left in his
private car tonight for San Francisco,
where he will spend several days.
At the Potter hotel tonight Gould
declared that his visit to California
had no significance in the. business
world: that he had Just completed an
inspection of the St. Louis & South
western railway and had traveled to
the coast "just for the fun of it."
Concerning a rumor that he is to be
a director of the Wastern Pacific rail
road, and may be its president, GouTd
says -jjftat it Is untrue and that he has
no connection with that road- t ,
TAFT MEN MAY
BE TURNED DOWN
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 9.—While Acting
Governor Wallace will not say what
action he will take concerning the re
quest of the regular republican state
central committee for a special session
of the legislature, so that the Taft
electors may get on the November bal
lot, It was rumored about the capitol
today that he would;turn down the re
quest.
Wallace admitted having received the
application and said he would give it
his immediate consideration.
"I do not know what-.I will do, but I
shall decide the question at the earliest
possible moment," said Acting Governor
Wallaec. **I will give the application the
deepest of consideration before deciding,
what my anawer will be." * ,
MISSING SON IS
FOUND AT WORK,
MIND A BLANK
Horace H. Walling Convinces
Car Sealer That He Forgot
His Real Name
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
STOCKTON, Oct. 9.—Horace H. Wal-
ling, vice president of the Keystone
Type Founders company, today found
his missing son for whom he had ad
vertised all over the coast, in this city,
and took him home to San Mateo.
The young man, who was suffering
from lapse of memory and apparently
had lost knowledge of his identity, was
working as a car sealer for the South
ern Pacific company.
Young Walling was a wireless tele
graph operator and while in t*he navy
was stricken by sunstroke. He was
sent to a hospital at Norfolk, Va.
On recovery he was ordered home and
his folks were instructed not to allow
him to do any violent exercise. The
last heard of him was September 11.
Fled From Tennis Game
He was playing tennis when he be
came overheated. He laid aside his
tennis racket and disappeared. He
went to Sacramento under the name of
Eugene Harold Hickey, and then came
to Stockton. Chief Clerk Tandrow of
the Southern Pacific freight office took
a fancy to him and gave him employ
ment. The boy gave as reference his
nurse at Norfdlk.
The father had written the nurse,
one Fitzgerald, concerning the boy's
disappearance. When Fitzgerald re
ceived the photo and reference blanks
from the Fidelity Bond company, he
telegraphed the boy's father. Walling
ime.diately took the train for Stockton.
▼he boy did not recognize his father.
"Well, Horace, don't you know me?"
asked Walling, when he met his son
at the Southern Pacific depot.
Youth Denies His Name
"Are you speaking to me?" asked the
boy. "My name Is not Horace. My name
is pugene."
"No, my son; your name is Horace
Stuyvesant. Walling of San Mateo. I am
your fgther. Don't you remember your
father?"
1 ""My name Js Eugene Harold Hlekey,"
the car sealer said. "My father was
Continued an Pas* S. Column 4
?\ THE WEATHER
YESTERDAY — Highest temperature, 68;
lowest Tuesday night, 50.
FORECAST FOR TODAY—Fair, moder
ately j»arm; light north mnd.
For Details of the Weather See Fate 13
i
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
WAR RAGING
ALL ALONG
OTTOMAN
BORDER
l
Whole Northern Frontier of
Turkey Is Ablaze With Strife
as Result of Balkans
Uprising
BULGARIANS DECIMATE
FORCE OF MUSSELMANS
Advance Guard of Islam Army
Defeats Montenegrins and
King Nicholas Rushes
Reinforcements
PRINCE MIRKO TASTES
BITTERNESS OF REVERSE
[Special Cable to The Call]
LONDON, Oct. 9.—The entire
northern frontier of Turkey,
from Antivari, on the Adriatic,
to Alo-Gon, on the border of tte
Black sea, Is aflame with war tonight.
According to a late dispatch filed in
Karakal, Roumania, this afternoon, a
horde of Roumanian bandits, actins
as the advance guard of the Bulgarian
army now being rushed to the frontier
from Sofia and Shumla, fell upon a
force of Turks massed in a gorce
above Mustafa Pasha and decim itcd
them after a hand to hand encounter.
The Mohammedans were under
Erhed Pasha, who was the last to
fall. He severed his windpipe with bia
scimitar when mortally wounded by
the leader of the Roumanian?.
Montenegrins Beaten
On the western frontier the army of
the sublime porte won an abortive vic
tory over the Montenegrins, who as
sailed Kalava in force. King Nicholas
of Montenegro was not present at tfefl
battle, but when news of the fighting
reached him he rushed reinforcement?;,
hoping to open the war with a decisive
victory.
The reserves arrived too late and
Prince Mirko. who accompanied the
first brigade, had the unpleasant ex
perience of beginning his taste of re»|
warfare under the gloom of serious re
verse. The prince tried to rally the
stragglers, but they had lost heart Mov
ing to ferocity of the Moslem rallies.
In Kalava the Turks used several
light automatic field pieces of German
construction with deadly effect. The
fight continued throughout a bright
moonlight, according to one account.
and the Montenegrin infantry deployed
in a broad valley, the lower basin of
which was unprotected, leaving them
an easy target for the Turkish shells
and small arms. If the Turkish eont
mander in Kalava had been properly
supported the Montenegrin invasion
might have been nipped in the bud. A
swift, concerted move across the fron
tier would have placed Cctinje in jeop
ardy and demoralized the morale of the
Montenegrin army. The combination
was lacking.
Serious conflict is reported anions
the Turkish commanders.
Prince Peter Opens Battle
At dawn this morning the main
force of the Montenegrin army at
tacked the Turks, strongly entrenched
on Mount Slanitza. Prince Peter, the
youngest son of King Nicholas, ftrci!
the first #hot at the Moslem position,
a band of househofu regiment playing
the national hymn and the soldiers
kneeling in prayer, callin# upon God
to aid them in ridding Europe of the
Turk.
Following this dramatic opening the
charge was sounded and the Monte
negrins, regaining the courage iaal
through their previous reverse, rushed
up the mountainside and assailed thr
Turks with cold steel. A battery of
artillery had silenced the Turkish
guns, which were abandoned in haste.
BULBS
for Autumn's planting,
from Holland and Japan,
are now in. These bulbs
are on display with life
like illustrations, in nat
ural colors, showing Just
what the flowers will look
like in the spring. See
them at our Seed Store,
one block from the Ferry.
C. C MORSE & CO.
•SEEDS BULBS, PLANTS, TREES.
Retail Seed Store,
121 Market Street
Nurseries, Glenn Aye., Oakland,
. ynd Flayward, Cat. I

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