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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 16, 1912, Image 11

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IN WOMAN'S WORLD
course, the San Francisco club will be as old, but then the study of Browning
(or Dickens) will have been pursued for 40 years in Philadelphia. In Boston,
who can say how long? Still, the San Francisco club does very well, and if
jgttfcers depart into prose or the modern philosophies, the San Francisco club
remains faithful to the poet. It was in March one day, when, very likely,
tbe March sun felt like May, that a group of earnest students formed a club.
They had all read Browning, with more or less understanding, and had
severally discussed the hidden meaning of his verse. It all meant something,
they agreed. To more surely find the key through correspondence with
authorities then pondering the poems, and possibly also to learn forthwith
what the wind means in its moaning (it is so impossible not to quote, and
there is no reason to stop at the wind after "Sordello"), they formed a club.
This was in 1902.
For several years the club met anywhere at members' homes. There
were intellectual mornings to consider Mr. Sludge and esthetic days of
Florentine exploring, when some member, home from tracing footsteps of
the poet, told her travels. .
On one memorable occasion there was given "In a Balcony." A certain
lovely girl read Constance's lines and an interesting Englishman who thrilled
Greenway belles that year was Norbert. It seems to be remembered Mrs.
Xorris was the Queen. She has always been devoted to the cause of Brown
ing in San Francisco and has read the broken rhythm of his poems with
great success. The brilliant mother of a gifted son, the late Frank Xorris,
and, it may be apropos to add, the mother in law of clever Kathleen Norris.
It was due to Mrs. Xorris, with Mrs. Sloss and Mrs. Oulton, that the
Browning club found quarters in the Century club's new building, where a
room consecrated to its use is filled with relics of the poet. Souvenirs of
days in Venice and pictures of his homes and haunts, with editions of his
works and keys to their translation. There can really be no more interesting
and loyal Browning club in the country. Xot in twice 25 years will it devote
a seasoa to Dickens.
- Dora Winn was hostess at an
informal tea given yesterday at her
home in California street when she en
tertains* for her house guest Miss Ger
trude Greeley of Washington, D. C.
There was a score of the younger girls
bidden to the affair for the visitor.
* * *
One of the elaborate affairs ef next
week will be given by Captain and Mrs.
Martin Crimmins, who will entertain at
a dinner and dancjng party in honor of
Sir Thomas Lipton. There will be
Fhout 300 guests bidden to the ball that
rwtll take place at the Officers club at
the Presidio.
* * *
Captain and Mrs. Lawrence Burton
Simondb' have sent out cards for a re
ception to be given in honor of Lieu
tenant and Mrs. Boschen Monday even
ing, November 18. from 9 to 11 o'clock.
* * *
Mrs. C. C. Judson will be hostess at
a large bridge party to be given
Thursday ereniner, December 6, at her
home in Clay street.
*. * *
Mr?. William B. Hooper, who has
been at a sanatorium for the last few
d*iys with an attack of bronchitis, will
be able to return to her home in the
early part of next week.
* * *
Mrs. Frederick J. V. Skiff will leave
next week for Chicago, where she will
enjoy a visit of two months.
AMUSEMENTS
_£-% ■> mm _ LEADING THEATER
a ■ tWm U*m Fhoce—Sutter £460.
LAST-DAY
MATINEE TODAY—TONIGHT
Prices 50c to |2.00.
THE
CHOCOLATE SOLDIER
THE WORLDS QBKATBST COMIC OPERA.
« OM. NEXT MONDAY—SEATS NOW
Tbe Messrs. Slmbert & Lewis Waller Present
"A BUTTERFLY
ON THE WHEEL"
0 St Tendon Dramatic Suceesa with Lewie
Waller's All-Kngllgh Company. Prices 50c to $1.50
Entire lower floor $1 at Wednesday Matinees.
The Leading- Playhouse. Geary and Mason St*.
MATINEE TODAY—Tonight Last Time
JULIAN ELTINGE
in the Elaborate Musical Comedy Production.
-THE FASCINATING WIDOW"
Commencing Sunday Night—Sen >s Now Ready
DUSTIN FARNUM
I:i A. II Woo>l's Massive Production,
•THE LITTLEST REBEL"
A Drama of the rivi] War—loo People.
Evenings a- Matinee, f1.50 to 85c.
WEDNESDAY MATINEE, 25e »o 91
Safest and Most Magnificent Theater in America.
MATINEE TODAY AND EVERY DAY
THE HISHtST STANDARD OF VAUDEVILLE
NAT NAZAKKO & CO., tbe Acme of Afhletic
LULU McCONNELL and GRANT SIMP
SON in Their Latest Sncceas, ' In- Right Girl";
;E ii. WATT, the Electric Problem;
ADKLE PBRGT SON anri EDNA NORTHLANE.
idon Tivoli Girl*; Jf««-i>h Hart* MIAS
I. EBCHKN"; HOWARD, Scottish Sub-Vocalist;
ABCO BELLI. French Comedy Conjurors;
LfAYLIGHT MOTION MCTURES. Last
week. MADAME MARIA GALVANV. Entirely
New Program.
Ere. Prices. in<-. £:>c. r,oe. 7r.0; Box Beats. $1.
Mat. Price* (except Sundays ana Holidays). 10e.
50c. Phones— Douglas 70. Home C 1370.
LURLSINEII
nrsil AND LARKIN STREETS
OCEAN WATER BATHS
Swimming; and Tub Hath*
Salt water direct from the ocean. Ope*
day and eTenlisg, including Sundays
and holidays, from 7 a. m. to 10 p. m. Spec
tators' gallery free.
THE SANITARY BATHS
NatatoritiD) reserved Tuesday and Friday
mornings from '.< o'clock to noon for women
;.TERED OCEAN WATER PLUNGE
COMFORTABLY HEATED. CONSTANTLY
CIRCULATING AND FILTERING.
Hot A*r Hair Dryers, Electric Curling Irons
and Shampoo Room for Women Bathers Free,
BRANCH TUB BATHS, 2161 GEARY ST.
NEAB. BEVISADERO.
Thne Smart Set
THE twenty-fifth season of the
Browning society of Philadelphia
is to be devoted to Dickens.
Why this should be so is not
the point. Any Browning society is
free to study Dickens. After 25 years
they must have done the poet very
thoroughly, and the deflection is nat
) ural, if rather extreme. Why not
■ Meredith? However, the point is this:
For 25 years a Browning society has
flourished in Philadelphia, compared to
10 in San Francisco. In time, of
* # #
Lieutenant Edgar Lee Field. U. S. A.,
arrived this week from Manila and
after a brief stay here left Thursday
evening for Mississippi, where his wed
ding will take place.
The marriage of Lieutenant Field and
Miss Mary Charlton will be celebrated
Tuesday evening, November 29. at
Clareview, Jackson, Miss., and will be
a brilliant affair. The bride elect is
a daughter of Mrs. William Baker
Sibley.
Immediately after their wedding the
young couple will return to this city
and will sail in December for Manila.
Lieutenant Field has only 20 days leave
of absence. He was stationed former
ly at the Presidio with the Thirtieth
infantry and was recently transferred
to the Twenty-third, now at Manila.
Lieutenant Field is a relative of the
famous General Robert E. Lee.
Mrs. Howard Morrow has sent out
cards for a bridge party to be given
Saturday afternoon, November SO at
her home in Pacific avenue.
# # #
The first dance of the University as
sembly will take place this evening: at
the Palace and several hundred young
people will meet for the initial dancing
party of the season. The decorations
will be simple and the preparation for
the affair has been informal, but the
dance promises to be one of the most
enjoyable of the winter. There is a
long list of patronesses and a commit
tee of young men has made all ar
rangements for the success of the
party.
Two more parties to follow have
been planned in a delightfully Infor
mal way.
There will be a round of dinner par
ties this evening and the supper after
MVSEMENTS
HL 9 Phones:
Chi*. H. Muehlmano, Mrr.
MATS. TODAY and SUNDAY
ANOTHER BIG HIT
KOLB and DILL
With MAUDE LILLIAN BERRI
And Big Company, Present
"IN DUTCH"
By AARON HOFFMAN.
Prices—2oc to fl.oo.
SKATS KOU 2ND WEEK NOW
AI PA7 A D °' F * to, wwILL
ALLAIAK PhoD " Kearnr 2
* •"■ »«■•* «*»» Borne pbooe CUM.
MAT. TODAY and TOMORROW
LAST TWO NIGHTS
"GOOD IS THE ONLY POWER"
Maude Fealy, Jas. Durkin
"THE RIGHT PRINCESS"
Clara Louise Bnmnaffl's Dramatisation of Hex
Own Famous Novel Treating of
Mental Suggestion.
PRICES—Night, 25c to $1; Mat., 25c to 60c.
NEXT WBEK..«A COLONIAL GIRL"
Closing the Fealy-Dnrkin Season.
MATINEE THURSDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
YOLANDA
• mero
Jfm Sprf Hungarian IManinte
SCOTTISH RITE BALL
TODAY AT 2:30
TICKETS |1.50. fl. 75c. at Sherman, Clay
it Co.'s and Kohier A- Chase's, and
at, the hall this afternoon.
Stein way Piano.
Mail Orders are now being received by W. I*.
Greenbsum, care either of above offices, for
ALICE NIELSEN °*g* A
in "THE SECRET OP SCZANNE"
At Scottish Rite Hall, Thurs. Eve., Nov. SI,
and Sun. Aft., Nov. 84—Prices $2.50, |2, jl.
ETC.
CONCERT
MME. NARBUTT TADEVICH
gOPBANO
MASTER JULIUS LISTER
VIOLIN
SCOTTISH RITE HALL
NOVEMBER 16, Hi'AQ P. M.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1912.
———.—- 1 —— ——^—
Charming Debutante to Be
Entertained This Winter
4 . , . 1 . . , I—,1 —, « <
j Miss Oiga Schulze, accomplished and attractive, who will be the honored
guest at many informal affairs during the season.
MISS OLGA SCHULZE, one of the most popular debutantes this season,
has recently returned from abroad with her mother, Mrs. Oscar Schulze,
and will be entertained at a series of informal affairs this winter. She
is an accomplished girl, who has passed a great part of her time in musical
study, and sings unusually well.
Miss Schulze is also a pianist of ability and is in demand for her musical
talents as well as for her charming personality. One of the largest affairs
for Miss Schulze will be given Wednesday afternoon, November 20, when
Mrs. Richard Bayne will entrtain at her home in Jordan avenue.
Among those who will be in the receiving party with Mrs. Bayne are:
Mrs. George Kellam, Miss Hazel King, Miss Kate Herrin, Miss Louise Janin,
Miss Henriette Blanding, Mrs. Millen Griffith, Miss Susie Russell and Miss
Madge Wilson. i
the dancing will be attended by the
young- people who are members of the
assembly and their guests.
There will be scores of pretty gowns
that will add to the brilliance of the
affair and the patronesses will be on
hand to farther the social success of
the occasion.
The membership Is. not composed en
tirely of college folk, for the debu
tantes and girls of the younger set, to
gether with the young men who are
socially active, have joined the assem
bly this season. The series of dances
will be a great social success, accord
ing to the young people who have or
ganized the University assemblies.
* * *
Eugene Sherwood, who has been the
guest of his mother, in Filbert street,
has gone south to pass the winter.
Stansfield Sherwood, who also has
been a visitor here for a fortnight, has
returned to his home in Monterey.
* * *
One of the elaborate dinner dances
of the season will take place Thursday
evening, November 28, at the residence
of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Carman, in Belle
vue avenue, Oakland. The occasion
will be the twenty-fifth anniversary of
the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Carman,
who have invited their friends from
this city and across the bay.
* # *
Dr. and Mrs. Benjamin P. Brodie ar
rived Thursday evening from the east
and are at the Fairmont. They will pass
the winter in California and will go
abroad in the spring for a lengthy
tour of the old world. Mrs. Brodie
was formerly Miss Ann Tallant, daugh
ter of the late D. J. Tallant.
* * *
Mrs. Carl J. Rhodln has sent out
cards for a large tea to be given at
her home in Alameda, Tuesday, No
vember 22, in honor of two brides,
Mrs. Arthur M. Brown and Mrs. Dud
ley D. Sales.
* * #
Dr. Crittenden Van Wyck. who has
been vJsiting in the east for the last
month, will return about December 1
to his home In this city. '
* # *
Mrs. Frank Moffitt of Oakland will
pass the winter on this side of the bay
and has taken an apartment in Van
Ness and* Pacific avenue for the season.
* * *
Mrs. John Boggs is established at
the Fairmont for the winter.
•# # *
Cards are out for the tea to be given
Thursday afternoon, November 21.
when Miss Ramona Hamberger will en
tertain for Miss Una Wise and Miss
Marie Payne.
f # •
The dancing party given last even
ing by Mrs. William Lee Hathaway for
hor daughter. Miss Marie Craig Hath
away, was a charming affair and was
enjoyed by the boys and girls who are
WOMAN MAY BE
"ONE OF FINEST"
{Special Diipalch to The Call]
SACRAMENTO, Nov. 15.—City Com
missioner Bliss, who la head of the po
lice and fire departments, announced to
day that he would consider carefully
the plan proposed to him by the club
women of the city for appointment of
a police woman. Bliss believes that
such a woman would be of great value
to the force. He will probably ask
the city commission to create such a
position, he said.
Tbe Call la now an absolutely in
dependent newspaper. Try It ont
and pee*
members of the Junior Assembly. The
affair was held in the white and gold
ballroom at the Fairmont and attended
hy more than 100 young people. The
decorations in the ballroom were chry
santhemums and greens, making an ef
fective setting for the gowns of the
young girls' who were dressed mostly
in white or pink. Mrs. Hathaway was
assisted in receiving her gueßts by the
following:
Mrs. Bowie Detrick ! Mrs. Nicola? Betts
Mr*. W. F. Perkins \Hr*. Walter Scott
Mrs. Florence Porter, Franklin
Pflngst I
Among those who participated in the
affair were:
Misses— Philip Bekeart
Margaret Adams Frederick Beaver
Florence Bandmann Harold Black
Eleota Boke Colton Bryan
Margaret Barker Sherwood Chapmana
Leo Beckett Louis Carrigan
Grace Bonestell Andrew Carrigan Jr.
Beatrice Butler Lei and Carr
Linda Bryan Arthur Code
Miriam Beaver Robert Clampett
Erminie Calrln Bouie Detrick
Eileen Code Thomas Dargls
Kathleen Coleman Grant Dewey
Gertrude Curtlss Russell Dean
Marion Doe Arthur Evens
Dorothy Dean Morse Erskin
Josephine Dunn Paul Fagan
Marlon Devendorf Philip Flnnell
Winifred Faxnsworth B. Fox
Mary Freer Charles Gibson
Helen Hooper Harry Gaunt
Heglna Henry Orel Goklaraceos
Alvida Bamberger Bernett Hood
Gertrude Hopkins Joseph Hooper
Dori Kitgariff Edward Harrison
Elizabeth Kendall Alfred Hatteroth
Erma Keithly Clinton Jones
Minerva Lovell Byron Jackson
Edith Kinneraly Vandike Johns
Paula Leicbter Louis Jefferya
Edith Locan James Jefferya
Frances Mathlen George Judd
Elinor Mann Lester Kilgarif
Isabel McCrackin Stewart Kendall
Dorothy Morgan Herbert Langhorne
Eugenia Maston George Lundsy
Alice Morse Charles Lundsy
Elisabeth Byster nana MeEwon
Mildred Plersoa Robert Martin
Ijnnne Plum Bolton Milila
Kuth Perkins Richard McLaren
Marie Russell Cosmo Morgan
Florence Storey Laurance Matbleu
Margaret Storey William W. Morgan Jr.
Esther Sharon Joseph Moody
Emily Tubh* John Norrls
Julia Van Fleet Lucius Norrls
Ola Willett Alfred Eyater
Ruth Welsh Belcher Peterson
Sara Wright Harold Pierce
Mvelyn Waller Alfred Rich
Helen Wallack Oharlea St. Goar
Marie Whiting Frederick St. Goar
Marie Louise Winslow W. S. Snook
Galene Gale Douglas Short
Katherine Nevens Herman Schulster
Dorothea Jefferya Jurouie Tallent
Marlon Regensburger Arthur Town
Camllle Adams Lorance Waller
Messrs — Stokey Wilson
Charles Bruning Warren Wilson
Charles Bandmann I Edward Pflngst
Edward Bullard John E. Porter
Fisher Buckingham Benjamin Goleber
Albert Beell Thornton Grimes
Garth Boerleke Frederick Clampett
U. D. C. TO MEET
IN NEW ORLEANS
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15.—The United
Daughters of the Confederacy in con
vention today voted unanimously to
hold tha 1918 convention In New Or
leans. Today* sessions were meagerly
attended, many of the delegates going
to Annapolis, where they were enter
tained by Governor Goldsborough of
Maryland and the Maryland division
of the Daughters of the Confederacy.
PARISH MISSION SUHDaY-A mission for men
of Most Holy Redeemer oarlaa will begin Sun
day morning and continue a week. It will be
conducted by Ber. Denis J. Kavaaagb, of at.
Ignatius college.
AMENDMENTS
DISCUSSED
Officials Explain
Their £urporl
Monthly luncheons hereafter will be
a part of the scheme of things with
the New Era league, and the first of
these took place yesterday at Hotel
Court, Mrs. Lillian Harris Coffin, presi
dent of the league, presiding.
The charter amendments to be voted
on next month were the subjects for
discussion, and addresses were heard
from Supervisors Charles N. Mu rdock
and William McCarthy, with a special
address on local option by Rev. Charles
N. Lathrop of the Church of the Ad
vent.
Mrs. Coffin said that those present at
the luncheon would hear the amend
ments dealt with by the supervisors,
who might be considered as experts and
whose opinions would be of value.
People so frequently voted sentiment
ally, she said, that It might be a good
thing for them to hear the amendments
explained from a financial
and for that purpose she had secured
Supervisor McCarthy of the finance
committee, who would give facts and
figures.
PACTS ABOUT TAXATION
The supervisor said tnat his commit
tee had been criticised severely for its
extremely careful policy, which had
been necessary to prevent a deficit at
the end of the fiscal year, as no "heir
looms" had been "bequeathed by the
former board." They had, however,
kept down the tax rate, which was
lower here than in any city of equal
size in the United States. Here the
assessments were but 60 per cent, sup
posedly, and were In actuality but little
more than 40 per cent, while New York
had 95 per cent, and Baltimore 100 per
cent.
Should all of the amendments pass,
it would bring about an increase of
taxes, but this, he said, was right. If
the city could not increase along the
lines outlined by these amendments
—which would mean, of necessity,
greater revenue—it was safe to Infer
that it could never increase along any
other lines worth while.
The taxes probably would be raised
from a rate of $2.15 this year to about
$2.42.
McCarthy spoke strongly In favor of
the two platoon scheme for the fire
men, saying that he himself had been
a fire commissioner and he knew some
thing about the life of the firemen.
DESERVE SHORTER HOURS
"I am," he said, "absolutely commit
ted and favorable to this amendment,
No. 5. In this age, when we pride our
selves on being humanitarian, It seems
to be nothing short of criminal to keep
a man 24 hours In an engine house.
The fireman takes his life in his hand
every time he goes out, and seldom is
there a fire of any importance that
several of them are not hurt. They are
not asking an eight hour day; they
demand simply 12 hours, that occasion
ally they may see their families. It
will mean more men, but better con
tented men, and that means better ser
vice and greater efficiency."
The amendment affecting the depart
ment of electricity McCarthy d4d not
favor, saying it was anything but mod
est on the part of the employes of that
department to make the demands which
they did.
Supervisor Murdock In his address
spoke against this amendment, both the
speakers declaring that its presenta
tion by petition was not quite in ac
cordance with what they should have
done. The proper method of procedure
would have been through application
to the supervisors for a reasonable raise
of pay.
CIVIL SERVICE AMENDMENT
Supervisor Murdock spoke briefly on
each of the amendments to be pre
sented and he also advocated the pas
sage of the two platoon plan.
The civil service amendment was the
particular subject of his discourse and
he explained thoroughly its workings
and its advantages.
Father Lathrop spoke in favor of
local option, saying that it did not
mean a "dry town," as its enemies ware
declaring, but it was an "enabling
measure" by which people in the resi
dence districts might vote as to whether
they should have saloons situated there.
It was not a measure working hardship
on the saloon keepers—too many sa
loons being bad for thsm—and It en
abled the people to keep the outlying
districts free from the terrible evils of
the small saloons. He had recently be
come Interested in the liquor question
as an«mportant problem, since he
realized that of paroled prisoners 15
per cent were returned to the prison,
and of these 98 per cent fell from
grace through liquor.
VARIED PROGRAM
AT CLUB MEETING
A program of music and readings
filled the afternoon of the Memo. Re
donda club meeting yesterday at the
Richmond Masonic temple and at the
close tea was served.
The numbers were as follows:
Vocal solo, Mrs. Maria RoecHel Gmbb, accom
panist, Madame Roeckel; reading. Miss Alice
Mlttelstaedt; violin solo, Mrs. S. Woolfe-Leon,
accompanied by Miss Frances Buckman: reading,
Mrs. O. A. Graeber; vocal solo, Mrs. Mabel For
ester Price, accompanist, Mrs. Leon; violin polo,
Mnster Nell Sedgwick, accompanist, Mias Banner
man.
OIICJOPIIaIK , IQCZ >|fal|t [Ql M[BHC=IOCZ3|[£
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS AND CHEAP SUBSTITUTES 1
° BAKER'S |
Breakfast Cocoa
llttll JlkP* is the standard for quality y
y .W vlllfe or those wnose occupations require clear U
fil EHin m VKf' and steady nerves, as well as those in poor A
flH§ _J I Mtf nealtn or °* delicate digestive powers, it is the ideal j
Hj | I beverage. Prepared with milk or cream and sweet- j
■ L iMW? « ne( i to the taste, it is delicious, wholesome, abso- j
o Utely pUre> and ° f high f °° d Value * o
r TRADE-MARK ON EVERY PACKAGE
Booklet of Choke Recipes Sent Fr«e
Walter Baker & Coe Ltd. - . - Dorchester, Mass*
U ErtaWbhed 1780 U
gteraoEZDHPiK " ' "M»l: „„ , 3fOu z=k» ~ •■ o
C"J» »"iiH » r» ■iriiii ■■"" m- minmiam.!- ■<■ ■. , II ,II , fl.jjS,
Friends Always Useful,
Enemies Never
ONCE upon a time a young woman had unintention
ally offended a friend of hers. Another friend went
to her, told her how she had antagonized their
mutual friend and urged her to explan matters and win
her friend back.
The young woman refused.
Finally the peace maker said: "But, aside from all
other considerations, Mrs. R. is an influential woman.
She is valuable to have as a friend."
"What do I care?" said the obstinate one. "I am
going away from here in a few weeks and shall probably
never see her again."
She went away. Ten years afterward she came back,
a widow and penniless, to earn her living in the town
sne naa never expectea even to visit again. Ana sne ■» ;
found that the position of librarian which she hoped to obtajn was practically
in the gift of the woman w)iose friendship she had said she would never need.
Yes, she got the position, but only because the woman she had antag
onized was one of those rare souls who are willing to pass by the false and
tawdry glitter of vengeance for the real solid gold of self-conquest.
. Now, it seems to me that there are a great many people who, like this
woman, are careless how they lose or antagonize their friends when they
think they will not need them again.
How selfish and cold hearted and mercenary this is I don't need to say.
But what I want to point out is that, ethical considerations entirely aside,
it is never wise to throw away a friend, no matter how far apart you think
your paths will lie. The" whirl of circumstances that sends us willy nilly,
hither and thither, may bring you close together again in a month. And, no
matter how uninfluential he seems, some day he may be quite as necessary
to you as the little mouse was to Aesop's lion.
Besides there is another point of view which an experience of a friend
of mine illustrates. He once applied for admission to a desirable club, and
was promptly blackballed, and this was the reason: His cousin had once
belonged to that club, and just before his departure t£> another city had
got into trouble with the club's'officers. Feeling that he wasn't going to
be there any longer, and so it didn't matter, he had thoroughly freed his
mind to them. The resulting antagonism made trouble for this cousin, of
whom he happened to be very fond.
When you antagonize any one you start circles of trouble which reach
distant shores. It may be you, and it may be some one else you wouldn't
injure for the world, who will suffer.
When it is necessary to antagonize any one in order to stand firm for
a principle in which you believe, do so; the consequences will take care of
themselves. But otherwise don't do it; it doesn't pay.
DATES SET FOR
TWO COTILLONS
Final arrangement* for the two balls
to be enjoyed this season by tha Im
promptu Cotillon club were perfected
by the patronesses who met in the
home of Mrs. Joseph A. Donohue in
Jackson street.
Thursday evening, December 12, was
set for the first, and Thursday even
ing, January 30, for the second. Both
affairs will held in Assembly hall, 1268
Sutter street.
The list of patronesses includes sev
eral of those who chaperoned the
parties last winter. They are Mrs. Ed
ward L. Eyre, Mrs. A. Page, Mrs. John
Mailliard, Mrs. W. B. Tubbs. Mrs.
Joseph A. Donohoe and Mrs. John Brice.
The Impromptu club was formerly
the Cinderella club, which was re
organized last year. Each of the pa
tronesses subscribed $100 to the club
and the number of members was lim
ited to 200, most of whom were mem
bers of the younger set. The pruning
of the invitation list last year caused
nine days of gossip over the teacups
and three months of heartache for the
young people whose names had suf
fered omission. *
The invitation membership list will
be about the same as that of last sea
son, and excepting the election of Mrs.
John Mailliard to replace Mrs. Edward
Eyre on the financial staff there will
be practically no alterations even on
the executive board.
"For tbe Bigger, Better San Fran
cisco la tbe pledge and aim of
Tbe Call.
Children £»
Most Have Good light for Studying
A poor light strains the eyes, and the injurious effects may
last for life. An oil lamp is best. The light from the Rayo
Lamp is soft and meK*aw. You can read or work under it
for hours without hurting your eyes.
The RAYO is constructed scientifically. It U the
beet lamp made—yet inexpensive and economical.
Tte Lamn m * de of »°l»d brass —nickel plated.
*-•«*"*>■• Lighted without removing chimney or
•»* %%s*Vlr \JF shade. Easy to clean and rewick. Made in various
styles and for all purposes.
Dealmra Eomrywhmrm
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
* GCaaforala)
Ml MaAa* Stress, Se» Fwacfaos
Ruth Cameron
I: RUTH CAMERON ',
USELESS GIVING
TO BE OPPOSED
NEW YORK, Nov. 15.—Mrs. August
Belmont, Miss Anne Morgan and other
prominent New York women are among
the founders of a new organisation,
"The Society for the Prevention of
Useless Giving." The society will do
It's utmost to abolish the* "exchange
system" of Christmas giving among
♦ hose who can ill afford it.
THE HOLIDAY SHOP
RADKE&CO.
219-221-223 POST ST.
Suggestions for Christmas
TAHITI BOXES, Sterling Silver.
from $8.50 to $60. Also In Solid
Gold and Jeweled. 100 styles from
which to select.
FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE PINS, $8,
$3.50, $4, $5 and up, and in en
graved and jeweled, in pearl, sap
phire, ruby, diamond, amethyst,
etc.
BRACELET WATCHES, In leather
straps to the solid gold, from $10
upward. Our "Petite" Model Spe
cial at $50 each in 14K gold.
7

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