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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 18, 1912, Image 1

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Number of sports items in yesterday's
CALL 73
Chronicle 60
Examiner 43
Both Quantity and Quality in The Call
VOLUME CXIL—NO. 171.
SUBLIME PORTE SEES FLASH OF TCHATALJA CANNON
YANKEE HEROES
BACK FROM WAR
IN NICARAGUA
Glacier in Port Brings Stories of
Daring U. S. Marines at Bat
tle Front
Color Bearer Plants Stars and
* Stripes on Hill Despite Sharp
shooters , Hail
Lieutenant With Crew of Eight
Invades Enemies , Land to
Capture Filibusters
HERO tales of American spirit
displayed in the Nicaraguan
revolution, vivid stories such
as to make the heart of every
American pump faster with pride, were
brought in yesterday afternoon by the
S. Glacier, supply boat for the
United States cruisers and marines at
Corinto, Nicaragua.
Most stirring of the tales was how
a jackie color bearer dashed up Bar
ranca Hill in the midst of rebel fire
and planted the stars and stripes on
the en eral yards ahead of the
color guard, and then calmly turned
around to a marine, pointed to a rebel
sharpshooter who had been plugging
en-ay at him for 15 minutes, and said:
"Shoot that man."
Tho sharpshooter was shot, and a
few minutes later the body of marines
reached the crest, and victory was
with the boys in blue.
Another impressive story is how a
young navy lieutenant, three years
out of Annapolis, with a crew of eight
men in a steamers launch, cruised 75
miles up the river Estero Real, botin
dary line between Guatemala and Sal-!
. both unfriendtly to Americans
and in defiance of threats that his
party would be exterminated, pushed
"through the troubled waters for a
month after filibustering expeditions
and captured the filibuster sloop El
Aaruillo and a barge loaded with arms
and ammunition for the rebels.
Admiral Praises Deed
In the faro "f daily threat:, that he
and his party would be cut to pieces if
he proceeded to Fonseca gulf with his
capture, the young lieuterant com
manded the launch down the river and
ned his prize over to Rear Admiral
herland, receiving high commenda-
The heroic color guard at Barranca
hill was Master at Arms Klesow of the
U. S. S. California.
The brave young lieutenant was R.
G. Comfta of the U. S. S. Glacier.
In the wardroom of the Glacier tse
officers, messmates of Lieutenant
Coman, are as proud as navy men can
h- to have a hero in their midst, but
itenant Coman laughingly refused
to discuss his "outing," as he expressed
and sought to have his messmates
keep the affair from publicity.
The first incident is described as fol
io,' <:f the marines who wit
ne.c, ; ittle of Barranca hill:
"They were making a slow attack
at first. Master at Arms Kleeow was
< nalluurd on Pajse ."». Column .'»
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND—IF THE SAN fBANCISCO PHT
gICLAN WHO LOST AN OLD FASHIONED
HEVRY COTTIER GOLD WATCH IN OR
\F\R LOS ANGELES EARLY IN THE FALL
OF 1*» WILL COMMUNICATE WITH THE
CALLUS INFORMATION BUREAU AND
I-ROFERLY IDENTIFY THE WATCH. SAME
WIFJL BE PROMPTLY RESTORED TO HIS
POSSESSION.
IIVDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS
■-. * .■ ■/' '.: ; : ""-■■> - .Page./
Accountants—Certified ' Public .-. .'•.... •••• •10
Arents n.ed ......, •A•• •• • 10 - V,
Alameda X- ur-es to Let (Unfurnished* 11
Alameda .Heal. Estate ............ ••••• •• ■' **
Amusements . ."....•• •*•'• • ••• •• • •; ■-•: V" V. ,'
.'Apartment* ii I
Architects ... .....:.... ••••••• • • •* * '
Assayer* •••■■■ ••;: v• •. , '
4 AstroW>- W
....... .■■• •-.••• •■; -•- ••-JV "• • • \%
" Auction* ./•• VSV'V if
AutomobilPs .- ....• •• -• ••»;• ;••*•■•■'' rii
Baby»C*rrlages .. v i......... ..-••--•• •• J}
: Barters ami Supplies 1... -......:.•••••-•'■••• *£
Bln« BooS .....".....■.■ ••••.••••,•••••• ,o
Board »or O.i Wren .•••:-!•• •*
Biisinps* Ct>itires ..-..." • l-
Buslnroe TMiepes ....;.......• ■ ...:.•-■•■■■ j"i
I't-meealg •••.•-•.•••••••••.•,•,• •"-:'" J'J:
Busluoss AVtnted .*. '••:• •••• • • • •.•■■ 1-
Buttons awl Pleating; •"'•'• y
(in 1 Cicinfns •• ■ • •<- *• •: • ;IJJ
Catarrh and ■■ afseti ...,.• .......... 10
.ten's (.'hairs .......... ..........:.:.ll
City Ileal Estate. • •,•••• ••• • • •"• •:. *i
tiairviyants . . .......'.......•*••-•••■••••••••; 1"
Co ll a kc« to Let.;.......- 11 ]
Coir: Real = E5tate....v...... .'•'•• >li
Deafness enJ Catarrh... ...,...^-'....;...... ■"
Dentins ..............v:*..-.-..,. r • - : ] 2
Dog and Cat Hospitals. ;.....%.•....:/••'/••.•,. 1 " ■
Doll i.'.irriagf'S .......■.......•...".••••••-• 11 j
Tin-- ..................... •... •'• •••: 10 \
t Eil'icati'.-ial .......:;..; .....•..••...-: 10
* Eldt-r. ■ Paul .-.............. .'■•} .. .V.......... 2 1
Etuploj-iiitiit '•■ office? .. i ".' .'.*.. ":r. !•-'. '• '• • •'•'••>,.- •' Jβ
Employment Vented.' (Female) r.:"...".... .'.'.»:10 .
EmnlG> lu-nt' I Wanted ' iMuie. ..." -■-..".. •• • — .'.■*. l«'i
Feui4l« Hflp Wanted ..■ .."•'- '•"• ■ • •'•; 1"
Files Uecut r.. ............;... .•.'- •"•. •• • • 11
Finau.-i.W ..'..:.'.::.'"....:.............. - .'.12. : 13
n«ta for .5a1e......: .....:....;..:.•.■........ II '
Fiats to --1^t.'.v. ......... r.....V.;-.V..;..... It
Flat* to Let (Furnished); '". .:.."'., .■..*."... •.".;'.. 11
Fi-r Sale — Miscellaneous ..'.....:...T;......-;•;' 11
JYnitvale Real Estate ..*;;. ."..:-•.........;>H
Furnished Apartments .:...'..... 'i."V. .* .*..;..%. n I
Furniture.for Sal* .".*. .*...;:..'.'.. ;Y...'.-....." 11
. furs ..'..:.. '.'.:. i .-.";.-..-;'.~:;-.v.-.r.%..•.;"•;.;-:■ 10
Orman Sariog* 8ank........T."..;■..%:...■-.;.; 14
Godeau. Julius - 5.........'.... ..."... .... v.T.V 12}
QoMbei*. B«-wr & C 0............:.......;. 14 1
Hair Goods .%.:.......'.......:. :". .... ....... ; 10 ,
Hay ward Real Estate ..................'.'.\ : 11
Hordes,- Harness. , Wagon* ... .* 11 i
Hotels 12 I
DEVELOPMENTS OF A BAY IN THE BALKAN-TURKO WAR
♦ Great battle between Bulgars and Turks is on all along the line of the Turkish ships in sea of Marmora shell Bulgarian positions, and indica-
Tchatalja fortifications, tions are the sultan's Blac\ sea fleet participated in the fighting.
I Nazim Pasha telegraphed Stamboul after sunset yesterday that his army Refugees are pouring into Constantinople from the zone of conflict.
repulsed the Bulgars and destroyed three of their batteries. Cholera claims more than 1,000 victims daily in and around Stamboul.
GIRL LOST, MAN ENDS HIS LIFE
Kills Himself Day After Her Marriage
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
FRESNO, Nov. 17.—Because his
sweetheart was married to another
man, Harold V. Peck, 22 years old, a
telegraph operator for the Santa Fβ,
ended his life early this morning by
taking cyanide of potassium. Peck
left a note explaining his act, in which
he referred to his sweetheart as
"Laura" and "Toky," the latter being
a pet name.
"Laura was married yesterday and
5t was more than I could stand," he
wrote. Farther on the note says:
"I danced the last Texas Tommy with
you. but you did not know that niy
heart, was broken."
Laura Hamlett, 19 years 'old, and
WOMAN IS TIED TO COW'S HORNS
Death May Result From Act of Revenge
WINNIPEG, Man., Nov. 17.—Peter G.
Hanson, a farmer at Grlerson, 80 miles
northwest of Winnipeg, is sought by
the Manitoba police, who accuse him
of tying a young woman to a cow's
horns. Maggie Warauski, the daugh
ter of a neighbor, is seriously injured,
perhaps fatally, as a result.
The story sent here is to the effect
that Hanson, who was enamored with
the girl, became angry at her coldness
and threatened revenge. This revenge
TRAIN HITS AUTO;
TWO ARE KILLED
E. L. Downing of San Francisco
Loses Life in Accident in
Los Angeles
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 17.— E. L. Down
ing, 35 years old. of San Francisco, and
John McCall, 30 years old, of San Ber
nardino, were killed and two others in
jured when an automobile in which
they were riding collided with a Pa
cific electric freight train early today.
The accident occurred at Ninth and
Tennessee streets.
The automobile was driven by Wil
liam McCarty, of Phoenix, Ariz., who
arrived here several days ago. McCar
ty and F. P. Chatfleld, of Los Angeles,
were seriously but not fatally injured,
and they are in a hospital under po
lice guard pending an investigation of
the accident.
The automobile was said to have ap
proached the crossing , at a rate of forty
miles an hour and the freight train
which was passing was not seen until
the machine was within a few feet.
Hoping to avert a. collision, McCarty
turned sharply and Downing was
thrown out, and against a freight oar.
He was instantly killed. McCall died
several hours later. The machine was
completely wrecked. Downing and Mc-
Call were recent arrivals in Los An
geles.
Page.
Hoiisps tn I/Ct (Fnrninhed) 11
Houmm c> Let (Unfurnished) 11
Information Bureau . 10
Infects Kxterrainatod n
Invalid Chairs 10
Investment* 12
King Rug <V> 3
MlienfoM * Co 2
Loam on Cfleatry Property Wa5ted..*..!...,! 11
LodgiDj Huow* Ftot Sale 12
Lost .i.i F. -un<l io
lumber Kor Sale ... . v
.Ma!" ii.-lp Wanted 10
Maternity Homes ~. jo
Matrini" iini jo
Meetings—lVwijres 10
lftarellam<eoi Wants n
Money to lx>ni! jo
Money t) I.our Real Estate 12
Musical Ir«;truniP:its n
Notary Public , io
Oakland U<A*mt9 to Let i Unfurnished i 11
<t:iklaixl Heal Estate jj
Offices and Storns to I>»t 11
PaHfl- , Stilus Telephone Company 3
Patent Ait'.rr.fy* io
la io
Physici-ms io
Proposal* and Bide 12
Railroad Time TaMe» 18
Real }\<tit.> to Zxrhange 11
Regal Shoe tympany 8
Bwiw<v»! Ciiy Real Estate 11
Richmond R*-al Estate..... 11
Rooms 8 nil Board Offered , 12
iiOMBS anil Wanted 12
Rooms for Housekeeping 12
Room* to I>et i Furnished and Unfurnished). .. 11
SaiTsmenfo Valley Lands 11
Salesineu and Solicitor* io
Sanborn. Vail & Co 14
f4Hn»t«riti!i) for Rale 10
San Mute., Real Estate 11
Ssnlß (*inra Ro«l Estate H
Rafata Ortu l'-e»i Estate n
Rewins Machines H
for Something—TV> Exchange 11
Spiritualism 10
Stamniering 1A
Steamchtps 1.1
Storape and Moving Vafia 10
Tait 7,ink»nd 7
t<. lmm 11
Trusses 10.
Trjiewriters and Suppliea 11
Window Shades 11
Wood Baskets 11
THE CALL
William Risch were quietly married in
this city last night. Miss Hamlett re
sided In Lagrande, but was employed
as book keeper for a local green fruit
company. Her father keeps a store in
Lagrande. Peck's home was in La
grande also, but he came to Fresno In
the employ of the Santa Fβ about a
month ago.
A younger brother of Peck died In
Lagrande yesterday, after a long ill
ness, and Peck was to have been In
formed of the death when he came to
work this morning.
Peck went to his room shortly after
midnight last night, and when he
failed to appear this morning , his room
was entered and his -body found.
is said to have consisted of knocking
the girl unconscious and binding her
firmly across the animal's horns. The
cow took fright and dashed into the
bush, tearing off the young woman's
clothes against the trees.
When the animal became exhausted
it fell, and the girl was crushed
against the earth. She was trampled
under the cow's feet when it attempted
to rise. Neighbors, hearing the
in the woods, cut the girl
loose.
MASKED BANDITS
MAKE BIG HAUL
They Hold Up Saloon and Secure
$2,500 in Money and
Jewelry
[Special Dispatch lo The Call]
YREKA, Nov. 17.—Fifteen customers
and the proprietor of Victor E. War
ren's saloon were held up in Hilt at
10:30 o'clock last night by two masked
bandits, who got $2,500 In money and
jewelry for their trouble. Hilt is a
lumber town near the line.
Warren at first refused to obey the
command to throw up his hands and
fired four times at one of the bandits,
who returned the fire three times. War
ren finally yielded as did the 15 others.
While one bandit kept the crowd at
bay the other bandit made Warren
open the safe. All the coin it contained
was taken and the pockets of every
customer were stripped of valuables
and money.
The railroad agent, who had dropped
into the saloon on his way home for
the night, was relieved of the day's
receipts of $60. A diamond valued at
$1,500 was ripped from Warren's
bosom. The stone had been the wonder
of this part of the state for years.
The holdup, which proceeded with
great deliberation, lasted 20 minutes
and everybody was tired out keeping
his hands above his head. The rob
bery over the bandits disappeared
through the front door and into the
darkness. They got over $1,000 in
money and the diamond, leaving no
trace behind.
The marvel is that neither the bandit
nor Warren was hit by any of the
seven bullets. Bullet holes counted in
the walls of the saloon show that no
blank cartridges were fired. Victor
Warren is best known in Kennet, where
he owns a large saloon and is inter
ested heavily in real estate.
Passes Hunt for Bandits
REDDING. Nov. 17.—Posses of horse
men are scouring the mountains today
for two bandits who held up Victor
Warrens' saloon in Hilt, Siskiyou coun
ty, late last night.
ENGINEER, STRICKEN,
FALLS TO CAB FLOOR
Fireman Leaps to Throttle as
Train Enters Switch
RICHMOND, Nov. 17.—Charles Ad
ams, a Southern Pacific engineer, was
stricken with an acute attack of ap
pendicitis this morning as his train
was pulling into a siding near San
Pablo. Hβ fell from his seat and lay
writhing with pain on the floor of the
cab. Fireman Alexander Henderson
jumped to the vacant seat and stopped
the train. Cutting loose the engine he
ran it back to the station. Adams was
then hurried to the emergency hospital
in Oakland for treatment.
SAN FRANCISCO. MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1912.
UPTON ANXIOUS FOR COAST RACE IN 1915
"GET ME A RIVAL, I'LL BRING YACHT," HE SAYS
—4
Sportsmen | Here Will
Attend uonference
On Cup Contest
Many Affairs Arranged
For Englishman's
Week in City
Important Incidents
In Career of Lipton
1871—First trip to America, at
the age of 15. Returned after
some time to bnfld op a great
tea, coffee and eplre exporting
liouae,
1899—Hla first challenge for the
America cup* In SO mile race
off Sandy Hook, this "Shamrock
I" wu defeated |y the "Colum
bia," designed by Herreshoff.
1901—Second racer for the In
ternational trophy, between
"Shamrock ll' , and the "Colum
bia." American racht won
a grain.
1903—His thlid challenger,
"Shsmnipk IV," HÄ«" -ated by the
"Reliance."
1914—Expects to race again for
• the America cop.
1915—will bring: his "Shamrock
IV ,, to San Franciaco, through
the Panama canal, for an In
ternational yacht race during
the exposition.
"I will bring my Shamrock IV here In
1915 for an international yacht race, if
there is any one here to compete with,"
said Sir Thomas Lipton, premier Eng
lish yachtsman, and defeated but un
daunted contender three successive
times in the America cup race, on his
arrival in San Francisco last night.
Yachting is Sir Thomas' pleasure and
delight, and to further that interest in
whatever way he can he has come to
San Francisco to do hie part in arrang
ing for an international yacht race here
during the exposition.
The America cup, the elusive prize
for which he sought in 1899, 1901 and
1903, is still before his eyes.
"When I go to New York I hope to
arrange for a race for this cup In 1914,"
he said. "What is good enough for Un
cle Sam is good enough for me, and I
want to race under American condi
tions."
San Francisco is the spot where the
world's yachtsmen should gather in
1915, believes Sir Thomas, to celebrate
the opening of the Panama canal and
the practical elimination of the many
thousands of miles and the heavy fogs
of the old passage through the Straits
of Magellan. For this great race he has
offered the Shamrock IV, or some other
racing yacht.
San Francisco to Lead
"On account of its position, this city
will become the greatest on the Pacific
coast, and in honor 6f the opening of the
canal, the greatest work ever done by
man. there ought to be a fitting cele
bration," he continued. "Yachting is a
great sport abroad, and all nations
should be glad to participate. It should
help to bring a great crowd of people
here during*the exposition."
In the hope of arranging this a con
ference of representatives of the lead
ing yacht clubs of the Pacific coast will
be held tomorrow and Sir Thomas will
be present.
This will be oniy one of the many
events in which he will participate and
which have been arranged in his honor
for his week's stay here. Hβ has been
visiting in Seattle, Vancouver and Vic
toria for some time. He is stopping at
the Palace.
Yachting is his forte and of this he
talks most naturally, taking an inter
est not to be surpassed by any one. It
is. he thinks, the cleanest of sports.
Canal Means Revolution
Sir Thomas is also known, however,
as the founder of one ol the greatest
business enterprises in the world, and
so he estimates and talks of the future
of California and the greatness of the
Panama canal.
"The opening of the canal will mean
a great change in the west," he said.
"A great deal of freight that now
goes by railroad will .be transported
by ship, and at much less cost. The
very least that the canal will do is to
bring several hundred thousand people
here to settle. All the cities of this
coast will undergo a great develop*
Continued oa F«*e 3, Columa 5
SIR THOMAS UPTON.
LIPTON TO CALIFORNIA
On his arrival in San Francisco last evening Sir Thomas Lipton
wrote ftr The Call the following message to the people of California:
F£ THE WEATHER
IY^i^'MIDAY — Highest temperature, 66;
J~* T lojQJ&st Saturday night, 54.
I FORECAST FOR TODAY —Fair; light
♦ southerly wind.
4,' For D«taili of the Weather See Pace 12
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
FIGHT RAGES
FURIOUSLY
TILL SUN
SINKS
Nazim Pasha Telegraphs Porte
That His Army Repulsed the
Enemy and Destroyed
Three Batteries
TURKISH SHIPS HELP
SULTAN'S LAND FORCE
White Calm Prevails in Stam
boul, Everybody Is at Deadly
Tension Awaiting the
Climax
BULLETIN
I.OXDOV, Nov. 18.—A Dally Mall dls
patch from Constantinople received at
9 p. m. Mays: "Inofficial report* nay
the Turk* have sained a great inceew.
The battle opened at S o'clock In the
mornlnß. The Turks unr-reeded, after
some hours of violent fighting, In de
feating the right Bulgarian wins and
In repnlslns the left wing. They cap
tnred 13 guns and 8.000 prisoners. The
Turkish Trarships contributed largely
to this success."
BULLETIN
LONDON, Not, 17.—The I'skup cor
respondent of the Dally Mail tele
arraphed Saturday night at raldetupht as
follovrst "A battle Is proceeding; at
Monastlr. The Turks number 45,000,
with 40 jruns. The Servians number
more than 100,000, with 200 grnns, ln
cludlne siege irons and howitzers."
BULLETIN
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 17 The
United States station ship Scorpion lian
sent a detachment of marines to the
American embassy. The ambiniedor
says this Is not because he fear* an
outbreak, but is In the tray of com
mon action vrith other embassies. The
Scorpion has moved up the Boponis
and has taken a position opposite
Arnautkeul to protect the girls' school.
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 17.
The great battle between the
Bulgarians and Turks is on
all along the line of theTcha
talja fortifications. Nazim Pasha,
the Turkish commander in chief,
sends the following dispatch tonight:
"The battle, which commenced
this morning with an attack by Bul
garian infantry, lasted until one hour
after sunset. The enemy, who ad
vanced, chiefly facing our right wing
and our center, was repulsed by our
infantry and artillery fire. Three
Bulgarian batteries were destroyed."
Stamboul Hears Cannon
All through the day the sound of
heavy guns, booming distantly, was
heard in Constantinople. It ceased
only with darkness.
The firing along the entire fine
evidently was preparatory to an. in
fanfYy attack.
The Turkish batteries replied vig
orously. The Turkish ships in the
sea of Marmora shelled the Bul
garian positions. Undoubtedly the
fleet in the Black sea also took part In
the engagement, though details from
that point are lacking:.
Troops Seen on Move
In the afternoon the wind shifted
and it seemed for a time as though the
battle had ended, but again the boom
ing was heard and the movement of
troops could be observed not far from
the very gates to the capital. A detach
ment of several thousand from the
I ROYAL j
NESTOR
Original London & Cairo
Cigarettes
lOforlZ^
Bdw.Wojlf Co.
Jβ! 167 CALIFORNIA ST.
kBHHBB

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