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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 19, 1912, Image 1

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CALL 58 CALL 177
Chronicle 34 Chronicle 156
Examiner 38 Examiner IS'J
Both Quantity and Quality in The Call
VOLUME (XII.— NO. 172.
TURKS SURRENDER MONASTIR AND SCUTARI
Several Persons Killed in Big Los Angeles Hotel Fire
GUESTS ARE
DRIVEN
FROM
BEDS
Actress Misses Life Net; Dies
in Plunge From Top
Story of Burning
Structure
THREE KNOWN DEAD;
SEVERAL ARE INJURED
Blaze Still Raging in Early
Hours with Casualty
List Steadily
Increasing
t Special Dispatch to Jhe Call]
LOS ANGELES, Nov. 19.—Caught
in a death trap of flames while
asleep In their beds at the Hotel
*. St. George in East Third street near
Main, at midnight last eight sev
eral persons were burned to death In
the flames or killed from jumping to
the flre nets, and many others Berious
-tjr-tajnrea.
hx an early hour this morning It is
reported a score of others lost their
lives in the flames swept structure. An
effort is being made to ascertain thel*
name
Following is the list «f killed and
Injured:
KILLED
lUrm. CBartotfe Harrtngrton.
Kn. tSiia Motbb.
Joseph Martin of Los Angeles.
IXJURED
*»ni»y Harrington, 18 months old,
daughter of Mrs. Charlotte Harrington,
severely burned.
Bay Harrah, vaudeville performer, in
jured by jumping from sixth floor.
Mr*. Ray Harrah, injured from jump
ing from sixth floor.
Mre. F. J. Bock, 605 Jones street, Oak
land.
F. J. Bock, same address.
Julius Malonc, colored, fatally burned
and will dip.
Eddie Webster, prize fight trainer, in
jured jumping into net.
Mrs. E. Leaser, 43 years old, proprle-
Continued on Pace 4, Column 4
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND—IF THE SAN FRANCISCO PHY SI
CIAN WHO IX)8T AN OLD FASHIONU)
HENRY COTTIER GOLD WATCH IX OR
NEAR LOS ANGELES EARLY IN THE FALL
OF 1909 WILL COMMUNICATE WITH THE
CALL'S INFORMATION BUREAU AND PROP
KRLY IDENTIFY THE WATCH, SAME WILL
B PROMPTLY RESTORED TO HIS POS
SESSION.
IIVDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS
Page.
■ <ied Piihllc 12
r .- - ■ ■ Let (Unfurnished) 13
Allen Wiler, B 2
"
A part ments H
Architects tt
A.««ayer>i 13
Aotrolotrv 12
Attorneyg 12
Aun ion's 14
Antomobllee » *. l-
Bahy ( arrlape> 1-H
Barbers »nf) Supplies 12
f'.oard Children 3:j
Hi>iiieKs Cbe.ec*! 14
Business? f>ilipce« IIS
Hiisinni-s 12
Business Wante,) 14
Huttons anil Pleating 12
Cailleau. Aniiami 3
ralifornia Optical loiiipnny 1
<nrjxt Qieaolnf 12
Catarrh h n<l Dp»fncs-. 12
Children's Chairs , U
Civ Ueti! l>tat e ; ]."?
Cottasct, to 1/ff 13
Country H"u l 13
I>fafiH-*si and Catarrh 12
Dentists 12
l*>e Hnd • ,)t lloepttsta 12
TV>!| Carriages 13
Pressmaking 12
Edacational 12
Electra Vita 8
Kni|'lcyn<erit (>ffl.-e«. 12
Ennployment Wanted (Female) 12
Kniplovinent Wanted iMalei 12
lemale riolp Wanted 12
I'lleK Recut 13
rinsncinl , . 14
Hat* For Sa!p 13
Fists to t.ft 13
Flats to Let 1 Furnished 1 13
l"or Sale -Mi«.-ciiaiic»us 12
FnittTele R.al Kstato IX
Furninbed Apartments 13
Furniture For So ie 13
Fore 12
<;od«»ai). .lulius S 14
Hair Goods ' Tj
Meetings Clothinc IK
Harward Real Kstate 1: , , ]
Horses, PTarsesK, u«c,ins 1:;
Hotels 1.-;. 14
Houses t<. I/i (Fumfathcdi 14
Houees to Let (LnfurulsUcd) '. 13
111
EIGHTEEN PAGES— SAN FRANCISCO, TUESDAY,. NOVEMBER 19, 1912.—PAGES ITO 10.
Evangelist Says
Carnegie's Is Not
Real Benevolence
[Spccw/ Diipatck to The K^all]
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 18.
Robert E. Speer, evangelist and
mission worker, declared before
a large audience of students and
visitors at the University of
Pennsylvania that Andrew Car
negie was not a true philan
thropist because he pave only
to the Englsh speaking white
man. "Mr. Carnegie," said
Speer, "gives not a dollar for
the colored, yellow or brown
man. He gives only to the
white man, and then only to
those of the English speaking
race. His theory that the
" Anglo-Saxon race is better than
any other race is a hallucina
tion."
Quail Refuse to
Fly Out of City;
Sportsmen Pained
[Specie/ Dispatch to The Call]
ALLENTOWN, Pa., Nov., 18.—Two
coveys of quail, which made their home
on the farm of Muhlenberg college,
near the football gridiron, have be
come the special wards of Mayor Rinn.
These were discovered by gunners, who
took their dogs out to train them in
advance of the shooting season. The
gunners thought the Muhlenberg quail
would make easy sport. When they
came to hunt, the quail refused to fly
outside the city limits, and Mayor Rinn
declares it will be very expensive to
shoot them.
YOUTH HAS CIRCLED
WORLD 20 TIMES
Ws.i Finish 500,000 Mile Walk
Here in 1915
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
NEW YORK, Nov. 18.—A young man
who said he walked 20 times around
the world, covering a distance of 490,
--000 miles, entered the city hall today
and asked to see Mayor Gaynor. The
visitor , gave his name as Julius Rath,
and said he was 29 years old. He said
he had begun to walk in 1897 on a con
tract with the Lotus club of St. Louis
to walk 500,000 miles in 18 years. He
plans to complete his job at the San
Francisco exposition in 1915. Mrs.
Rath, to whom the walker was mar
ried on October 11, is following her
husband by train. She was Miss Lulu
Alberta Bell, whose home was in
Pittsburg.
EARTHQUAKE SHAKES
STEAMSHIP AT SEA
Severe Jar Causes Entire Vessel
to Tremble
SEATTLE, Nov. 18.—The earthquake
felt in Seward. Alaska, the night of
November 6. shook the steamship Ber
tha while it was steaming off Triplet
island, between Uyak and Kodlak.
"At 9:50 o'clock the night of Novem
ber 6 we felt a severe jar that made
the entire ship tremble," said Captain
TV. B. Knight, who arrived here with
the Bertha today.
"I made soundings, expecting to find
a shoal. Instead, we were in deep
water which seemed to boil all around
us while" a white mist rose from the
surface."
, Page.
Information Bureau 12
Information Wanted 12
Insects Exterminated 12
ln»alld Chairs 12
ItiTestmemts 14
Loan* on O>untry Property Wanted 13
i.odging Bommm for Sale 14
J-OKt hnd Found 12
Lumber for Sale 13
Male Help Wanted 12
Maternity Homes 12
Matrimonial 12
Medical 12
Meetings—Lodge* . . 12
Miscellaneous Want* 12
Money to I»an 14
Money Wanted—Real Estate 14
Musical Instruments 12
Nathnn-Dohrmanu Co 7
Notary Public 12
Oakland Honor* to Let (Unfinished) 13
Oakland Real Estate 13
Offleee and Stores to Let 13
Parker, D. X.. Dentiet I
Patent Attorneys 12
Pergonals 12
Physicla ns 12
Proposals and Bids 14
Railroad Time Tables 13
Hoa! Estate to Eiehange i«
Redwood City Rest Estate 13
Richmond Real Estate 13
Rooms and Board offered 13
Rooms and Board Wanted, 13
Room* for Housekeeping 13
Rooms t« Let (furnished and unfurnished)... 13
Rook Broe 3
Sacramento Valley Lands 13
Salesmen and Solicitor* 12
Samuels. D 10-18
Sanatorium For Sale 12
San Mfltpo Rea! Kstate 13
Sants Cni« Real Estate is
Sewing Machines J2
Sherman, flay & Co 10
Sloane & Co v
Something For Something—To Exchange.. .12-13
Spiritualism 12
Stammering 12
Stanislaus Lands 13
Steamships 13
Storage and Miring Vans 12
f* r e H «f 13
Trusses 12
Typewriter* nmi Supplies ]2
Window Sha<l«'S gg
Womi Baskets 13
TH CALL
FIRST PHOTOGRAPH IN THE UNITED STATES OF THE CROWN PRINCE OF TURKEY
The crown prince of the Ottoman empire is the central figure of the three on the right of the illustration. On the left is a map of western Turkey,
thowing the location of Monastir, which was.captured yesterday by the Servians. Al Monastir 50,000 Turkish soldiers laid down their arms.
SEVEN ARE SHOT
IN ATTEMPT TO
ARRESTCOUPLE
Fugitive, Aided by Woman,
Fires on Pursuers; Kills
Companion and Self
NEW YORK, Nov. 18. —A man and a
woman stood in a small room of the
Raines Law hotel in the Bronx tonight
and deliberately shot down three de
tectives and two other men who were
trying to place the pair under arrest.
After nearly emptying the eleven
chambers of a large automatic revol
ver, reinforced by shots from an or
dinary revolver in the hands of hia
woman companion, and probably
wounding four of those whom he shot
down, the man shot arid killed the
woman and then put a bullet through
his own head, dying instantly.
This is the outline of one of the most
serious shooting affrays the detectives
of this city have run into so far as the
conflicting stories of the shooting had
been sifted tonight.
Known by Several Names
The dead man was known by several
names, having registered at the hotel
as Joseph Vogel. The police declare
he was a native of Poland named Pheres
Doragyeski. The woman with him had
registered as Lottie Vogel.
Vogel was 48 years old and the
woman about 25.
The detectives were on the trail of
the pair, suspecting tbem of having
been accomplices in a diamond robbery
for which Sophie Beckendorf, a domes
tic, had been held for the grand jury
today. The woman who had lost the
jewels traced the girl to Vogels house
and told the detectives of her discov
ery. After a taxicab chase today, the
; detectives learned that the Vogels had
sought lodging at the Elsmere hbtel at
Cortland avenue and One Hundred and
Sixty-first streefin the Bronx.
Traced to Hotel
Central Office Detective Fay and Pri
vate Detective John Allen and Louis
Gerade went to the hotel in seanh of
their quarry late tonight. Ix>uis Mond
schein, the proprietor, told of the couple
having arrived in a taxicab early in the
evening and ordered William Butler, a
waiter, to show the detectives to the
Vogels , room. Vogel opened the door in
response to a summons, and as Allen
forced his way in, declaring that the
couple were under arrest, Vogel struck
the detective over the head with a
blackjack and then grasped a maga
zine revolver which lay on the bed.
His first bullet struck Allen in the
head and he fell, probably fatally hurt.
Fusillade of Shots
Detectives Fay and Gerade rushed
into the room, followed by Proprietor
Mondschein and Butler, it is declared
they did not fire a shot, hut expected
to eeize Allen's assassin. They were
not quirk enoupli. Vogrcl let go one
shot after anotlif-r. nearly every one
Contloued on Page 5, Column 8
ROCKETS AVERT LONELY TRAGEDY
WRITHING MAN SUMMONS HELP
Stricken suddenly with symptoms of
ptomaine poisoning in his lonely quar
ters at Mile Rock lighthouse about
noon yesterday. August Nelson, for two
years keeper of the light, writhed in
pain throughout the afternoon unable
to get assistance. Finally, through the
continued whistling of the lighthouse
siren and several rockets, which be
sent into the heavens after dusk, the
attention of the government tug Se
quoia was attracted. Captain Ander
son rushed his little vessel to the light,
house station and found Nelson ex
hausted from pain.
WAR WITH MINERS
SEEMS IMMINENT
Eight Companies of Militia Take
Field Against Rioting West
Virginia Strikers
CHARLESTON, W. Vs., Nov. 18.—
Four additional companies of state mi
litia were rushed- tonight into the coal
strike district of West Virginia to re
inforce four companies now in the field.
Armed miners are marching toward
Paint Creek to "clean it up."
Militia now in the field has been or
dered to halt the miners and shoot tso
kill if necessary. Miners shot up two
small villages today, but there were no
fatalities.
Engineer Blankenship, on a. special
train drawing several cars of strike
breakers, received a flesh wound when
a volley was fired on his train near
Eskdale this afternoon. A train carry
ing a company of militia proceeding im
mediately behind was not molested.
BRIDE GIVES KISSING
JUDGE COLD SHOULDER
She Had Been Married Before
and Was Chilly
SACRAMENTO, Nov. IS.—Judge W. A.
Anderson of the city police court, per
formed his first kissless wedding today,
and be has been marrying couples for
the last 25 years. Walter Pierce In
gersoll, aged 38, of Los Angeles, and
Mrs. Lois Miles, aged 27, of Colorado,
were bride and groom. Both had been
married before and they took the cere
mony as a matter of fact. Ingersoll
paid the judge and the two walked out,
without the slightest show of emotion.
LABORER FALLS FIVE
STORIES; MAY SURVIVE
His Fall Is Broker By a Sky
light
SACRAMENTO, Nov. 18.—John Go
setti, laborer, fell five stories from the
top of the Hotel Sacramento this after
noon, but Is svlll alive and physicians
believe he will recover. He struck on
a skylight on the second floor, this
breaking his fall. He has a broken
collar bone, a sprained ankle and a
sralp wound, but did not lose con
sciousness.
With the sick man on board, the Se
quoia started toward the city, after a
wireless had been dispatched to the
harbor emergency hospital asking the
ambulance to be at Howard street dock
No. 2, with a doctor.
Nelson, who ia 35 years old, was
taken to the operating table, where
physicians worked over him several
hours. He was found to be suffering
with symtoms of ptomaine poisoning,
contracted through eating tainted
meat. He was nervously exhausted
from his long struggle- with pain on
the little rock bound island.
DOG QUARANTINE
IS RECOMMENDED
Californian Asks Oregon to
Restrict Animals From
This State
SALEM. Ore., Nov. IS.—Representing
j that hydrophobia exists in widespread
j form in San Francisco, Alameda and
Marin counties, John Hubert Mcc of
San Francisco, who is identified with
I the movement to eradicate it from Call
| fornia, has written Secretary of State
I Olcott urging him to have the state of
j Oregon, through its state board of
i health, issue a quarantine against Caji
j fornia dogs.
Marin County Will Act
Attorney John H. Mcc, in explaining
his letter to the secretary of state of
Oregon warning against the spread of
hydrophobia and advising a quarantine
on all dogs from California, announced
last night that a convention of super
visors representing seven Marin county
towns would be held in San Rafael this
evening to take action against the
spread of the disease.
"I have received statistics from Dr.
W. A. Sawyer, director of the bacterio
logical laboratory in Berkeley, showing
thousands of cases in California and
an appalling spread of hydrophobia."
said Mee. "This meeting tomorrow
night will be the beginning of an agi
tation throughout the state foF the pre
vention of the disease. We advocate
that legislation be passed that all dogs
In the state be muzzled for a period of
one year, and that every dog with a
vestige of rabies be shot,"
Dr. R. G. Brodrick, health officer,
says: "Conditions In San Francisco do
not warrant such an act on the part of
Mr. Mee. Last spring we had an epi
demic of rabies, but it lias steadily
decreased. There Is a steady decrease
recorded for each month In the number
of cases of rabies. For the present
month there is only one case. I have
known Mr. Mcc personally, but do not
know of any move of his connected
with the rabies question except what
you tell me now. I can conceive no
motive that could influence Mr. Mcc in
asking Oregon to quarantine Itself
against California doss/ .
HOUSE LEADERS
AVOIDING HAND
BEHIND THRONE
Speaker Clark and Underwood
Announce They Will Not Let
Bryan Run Government
[Special Dispatch to The Call]
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18. — Champ
Clark, speaker of the house, and Oscar
W. Underwood, majority leader, have
informed their friends In Washington
that they do not propose to submit to
any effort by William J. Bryan to run
the United States government in the
next four years.
When Clark reached Washington he
was informed by his followers that Bry
an at private dinners and in his talks
with members of the house had dis
closed a determination to be the power
behind the throne in the Wilson admin
istration. He had been telling wha| the
democrats would have to do and what
he would expect of Wilson.
Speaker Clark has an old score to set
tle with Bryan and does not propose
that he shall constitute himself dic
tator of congress. If he- wants to run
the White House, Clark will offer no ob
jection, but If he tries to interfere in
the house there will be strong: objec
tion from both Clark and Underwood.
Bryan Shows Determination
A struggle seems bound to come.
It will not be of Clark's seeking, or
Underwood's, but as soon as he arrived
here Bryan let it be known that it Is
his purpose to take an interest in the
legislative program and will make cer
tain, in so far as he is able, that the
party lives up to the letter of the plat
form which he wrote in Baltimore.
On the other hand, it is a matter of
record that Underwood will not per
mit Bryan to interfere with the legisla
tion of the house, and now Clark, who,
during the "Underwood-Bryan affair,
was on good terms with both partici
pants, is against Bryan.
Their partisans insist that Bryan is
"feeling his oats" these days and giv
ing himself a large share of the'credit
for the democratic victory. They say
that his course will force President
Wilson to take sides in his controversy
with the house leaders.
Wilson Between Fires
In the routine course of business Wil
son Will be constantly associated with
Clark and Underwood, and if their atti
tude on any question is opposed by
Bryan, Wilson will be forced to take
some stand.
If the president should quarrel with
the housp leaders, the carrying out of
a party program would be made diffi
cult and If he should offend Bryan, the
president will probably find himself
in trouble outside of Washington. For
the Bryan men count confidently on
sejreral millions of democrats, who
they say, will follow the Nebraskan at
any time anywhere.
If/E WEATHER
YESTERIMY — Highest temperature. 68;
- le&esf Sinmay night, 54.
FdUECASIJ FOR TODAY—lncreasing
cloumpssjftain by nighU brisk south minds.
"CPj r<£#Rail* of the Weather 8m P*«e 17
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
RED TERROR
LOSES TWO
MORE BIG
BATTLES
Servians Capture Three Pashas,
Commanding General, 50,000
Men and 47 Guns in
Macedonia
ISLAM BADLY BEATEN
WHERE ALLIES ATTACK
Conflict Along Tchatalja Lines
Is Resumed by Bulgars
While Constantinople
Remains Silent
Summary of Important
Events in Balkan War
Belgrade announces that the
Turks hiTe mr rendered Scu
tari to the allle«.
Serbian* capture Moaaatlr, In
cludtuar three pasha*, the Turk
tab commander In chief, SO,OOO
men and 47 btum. Tale Iμ the
greatest individual success ot
the war.
Fighting continue* alone the
Tchatalja lines, and the great
victory there over the Bulbars,
reported by the Turk*, does not
rlna; true.
With cholera and typhns ravag
ing; Its demoralised army, aad
the Bulajars hammering: nt the
■rates of Stambonl, Turkey
again sues for peace.
BUIXETIIV
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nor. IS.—ln the
TebatalJa battle the Bulgarian left
vrtng la reported to have bad a slfg-bt
advantage Iβ today's fl&hMng In th«
neighborhood of Deikoi. The Turklnli
forces were deprived of the assistance
of the fleet, ovrlnjj to the high sea*.
LONDON, Nov. 18.—Any idea
the Turkish government may
have had of benefiting by con
tinued resistance must be shat
tered by today's news of the fall of
Monastir.
In the capture of that important
town the Servians took three pashas,
including the commander in chief,
Zekki Pasha, 50,000 men and 47 guns,
thus achieving the greatest individual
success of the war.
A private telegram received in Bel
grade today reports that Scutari ha
surrendered, according to a dispatch
to the Daily Telegraph.
Servian headquarters report that
the Turks attempted a sortie from
Adrianople yesterday on the side of
the Servian division, but were re
pulsed with great losses.
Monastir was the second city of
importance in European Turkey. Tt
was Turkey's stronghold in Macedonia,
and by its downfall Macedonia passes
completely out of Turkish hands.
What part the Greeks played in the
capture of Monastir has not been ascer
tained. It is known that the Greek
army was marching to the assistance
of the Servians, and it is supposed the
Greeks were able to cut off the Turk
ish retreat to the south.
The Servians naturally will be
elated at this victory, which outshines
Don't Look Old
just because
you wear Jm X |>r
eye glasses.
"Equipoise" t OJrf*
eye glasses \jJn}Eo^
make you look <mBET
young and y _
see young. They
are comfortable and [JKJPJ.
smart in appearance.
Put on and taken \\ Ti
off with one hand. «||
Wear Equipoise
California Optical Co*
(W.n»Feanimor« J.W.Darlg A.R.Fennimor*)
181 Post St San Francisco
1221 Broadway Oakland
(C. L. Hopue mt Oakland Store*

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