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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, November 21, 1912, Image 11

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men. But they added that, as a matter of fact, the men who could pose
gracefully as gentlemen were a hopeless lot, anyway. This, however, wasn't j
the point. Algernon Paget brought them back to it. and they went on giving !
individual definitions of a gentleman, because they had nothing else to do !
and didn't care whether a long line of predecessors in the divertisement had '
variously settled the question. As Algernon Paget said, it could never be j
permanently settled. Times change. Tea wouldn't have been a test in Beau j
Brummel's day. It was the way a man could propose a toast to a lady, then, I
he supposed, or take snuff. j
One man believed a gentleman was a man who was only rude to his I
equals. This, it was decided, would be a prize definition in a serious contest. !
The man was complimented. It was perfectly true. There could be no
superiors, of course. A gentleman recognized none. And to inferiors he was
unfv'ingly courteous. Stern, if necessary—when the service was bad enough
to justify it. But never forgetting that courtesy to inferiors marks the gentle-
With his equals a gentleman could be a* profanely rude as he liked.
Some one wanted to know how a man could be sure of his equals. He
said every one was equal in this great and glorious democracy. But he
supposed it just gave a gentleman more latitude than he had in other coun
tries. Algernon Paget referred him to F. Hopkinson Smith.
F. Hopkinson Smith is known as a model. He once said politeness was
from the heart. Not a formula to be applied. It was impossible to give a
single set definition of a gentleman, but he would say a gentleman was a
person who practiced toleration and sympathy. This. Algernon Paget j
thought, would make a man courteous to his equals as well as to inferiors, j
But it in no way affected the detail of afternoon tea.
* * * * * #
The Misses Anna and Lillian Deane The tea given yesterday by Mrs.
have returned to their home In Clay Richard Bayne for Miss Olga Schulze
street after a visit with Mrs. Drury was one of the enjoyable affairs of
Melone at Oak Knoll. the season and was attended by nearly
! FREE *™FREE~*"™"™REE *™7l|
Important Announcement £ s
MSB ™
Fathers, Mothers, Sisters, Brothers, W |
Here Is Your Chance. I
The Management of I
jSutro j
I Have engaged a swimming
teacher who will instruct you I </^^^
Absolutely Free »
Baths open 7 a. m.—6 p. m. *
All cars transfer.
CONCERT
J Tonight at 8:30 {
I Colonial! Bs!!ro€fn,St.francisllol:el j
MISS Hfrafp )
\ HELEN COLBURN ugamdrop {
• l\ Reserved Seat» |
ILMIII Bo ;£Sr- 1
• Frank W. Healy f
Safest and Most Magnificent Theater In America.
MATIXEE TODAY AND EVERY DAY
MARVELOUS >EW VAUDEVILLE
L. Leaky** American Operetta. "CALI
FORNIA." with Leslie Leigh aud Harry Griffith:
JAMES J. MORTON "A Fell.nv of Infinite
leai ; NoNETTE. tho Vloliuiat Who Slugs:
SCHICnTL'S ROYAL MARIONETTES: MERE
DITH AND SNOOZER. The Man and the Dug:
liernrn for thie week •>n!T, CLAUDIUS and
S< ARLET. Presenting •The Songs of Fifty
Years Ago"; LULU McCONNELL and GRANT
SIMPSON la "The Right Girl": NEW DAY
LIGHT MOTION PICTURES. Last Week NAT
WAZZARO A CO.. the A< me of Athletic Artistry.
Evening prices, 10c, 2.V. :>oc. 75c. Box seats. $1.
Matinee prices (except Sundays and holidaysi.
lOe. Me, BBt. Phones—Douglas 70. Home CU7$.
MARKET ST. OPPOSITE MASON
10—ELLIS NOWLIN TROUPE—W
In Their Laughing Scresm.
"THE FIRE FIGHTERS."
GERTRUDE LtE-FOLSOM & CO.
la tba Comedy. "THE GOLD CURE/
7—BIG VAIDKVIME ACTS—7
Mat. Dally at 2:30: Nights at 7:15-9:15.
PIN. AND | Mats. 1 :•*) and 3:30.
HOLIDAYS ) Nights Continuous froca, 6:30.
p r lc*a—loo. 20<* anil 30c.
* Weber&fieldS
Blr Mimical Festival
FUN IN A BARBER SHOP!
BIGGER! BRIGHTER! BETTER!
1 r\ Broadway N. Y. Comedy Stars ■* Q
I V Including the Famoin I X
lU MANICURE CURLS 1U
! BIG ACTS- 8
Unapproachable S. A C. VaudeviUeßUl
10c. 20c. 30c—B
LURLINE
BUSH AND PARKIN STREETS
OCEAN WATER BATHS
snlmmlng and Tab Batbs
Salt water direct from t!ie ocean. Open
every day and evening. InclrMlng Sundaya
and holidays, from 7 a. m. to 10 v. m. Spec
tatf>rs' gallery free.
THE SANITARY BATHS
Natatoriotn reserved Tuesday and Friday
mornings from 9 o'clock to noon for women
*. ° "FILTERED OCEAK WATER PLUNGE '
COMFORTABLY HEATED. CONSTANTLY
CIRCULATING AND FILTERING.
,% Hot Air Kair Dryers, Electric Curling Irona
lu,«nd Shampoo Room for Women Bathers Free.
r 3 BBANCH TUB BATHS. 8151 GEABY ST.
> th( NEAB DEVISADEBO.
The Smart Set
II was Algernon Paget who said his
idea of a gentleman, was a man who
could take afternoon tea the way
they do on the stage. Lightly, deb
onairly, and as though they really
liked it, carrying on a Dolly Dialogue
conversation between sips—which is a
dreadful word, he said, but the only one
to express the correct way of taking
tea.
lie said it at the club one day. Two
or three agreed with him and cheer
fully conceded they were not gentle-
TONTGHT AT *:IS
/■•JSak. «ad .Next Sunday Aft.
Hi NIELSEN
Sfik ■ /.ND HER ALL-STAR
OPERA COMPANY IX
Grand Operatic Concerts
nnd "THE SEURKT OF SIZANNE"
With Complete Orchestra
SCOTTISH RITE AIDITORHM
Van New and Sutler
T.ckets $2.50. $2. $1.50. $1. at Sherman.
May ft (o. s and k'ohler ft Chase's, or at
Hall tonight.
i f~~ OAKLAND "\
Tomorrow Aft. at Ye Liberty* Playhouse
OPERATIC CONCERT aurf
I "THE HARIIER PC SBrn.LR"
STKINH ' AY I'IAXO.
— . _ _
A I Z 1 A 7 1 I) O'Farrell nr. Powell
All Al AX Vbom Kearay 2.
*»** %*eTmm*WWmM Home Phoae C 4453.
MAT. TODAY—LAST 4 NIGHTS
THEIR FAREWELL WEEK
Maude Fealy and Jas. Durkin
"A COLONIAL GIRL"
! TRICKS Nlgbt. 2r«" to $1; Mat., Me to ' 50c
MAT. THURSDAY. SATURDAY, SINDAY.
|NEXT—ORRIN JOHNSON and MARGUERITE
LESLIE Leading In "TBE GAMBLERS."
MATINEE MUKICAI.K at 2:30 Fridar — \fm
: Lillian Birmingham, assisted by Miss Alma Bir
; m Ingham. Mr. Allan Dunn and Dr. H. J. Stewart.
i Seats u<»w gelling, (1, Toe and 50c.
J^*>**W*aaWßt READING THEATER
« Ei,il » n <* Marker
5L H KEI I* Facte—Sutter E4SO.
A HIT!
This Week and Next-Mat,*. Wed. and Bet
Special Matinee Thanksgiving Day.
Prices—soc to $1.50. •Top" $1.00 Mat. Wed.
MESSRS. BHUBERT and LEWIS WALLER
Present tbe
Dramatic Sensation of the Season
A Butterfly
on the Wheel
Wi:h Lewis Waller* All-Er.glinh Company.
Cr.rr.inc \*ale«ka fiuratt in •Tbe Kiss Walta"
MiHIISI-Jri
1: c leading Playhouse—Geary and Masoj.
Nightly. Including Sunday.
THIS and NEXT WEEK
A. H. Woods Present*
DUSTIN
FARNUM
In the Great War Drtima,
"The Littlest Rebel"
Kvg*. and Sat. Matinee, $1.50 to 25c.
Wednesday Matinee. 25c to $1.
Special Holiday Matines Thanksgiving Day.
Coming—"THE QUAKER OIBX."
■ —
McAihstSr
iw f# § hone,:
EVERY NIG,HT—EVERY NIGHT
SECOND 816 WEEK
KOLB and DILL
With MAUDE LILLIAN BERRI
Aad Big Company, Present
"IN DUTCH"
Bt AARON HOFFMAN.
MATINEES SATURDAY AM) SUNDAY.
Prleea—2.V to $1.00.
SEATS FOR THIRD NVEEK XOYV
THE SAX FRANCISCO CALL, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1912,
MISS CURTISS IS BETROTHED
Romance of the Days of Pinafores
Miss Fair Hager Curtiss, whose engagement is announced.
100 of the younger set. The decora
tions were yellow chrysanthemums in
the reception robm, with baskets of
the same flowers in the dining room,
mingled with the autumn foliage. Miss
Schulze has returned recently after a
tour abroad with her mother, Mrs. Os
car Schulze, and will be one of the
most popular of the young group of
girls this season- Those who assisted
Mrs. Bayne in the receiving party yes
terday were:
Mr*. Oorge Kellam I Miss Madge Wilson
MM Snsio II MM ill [Miss .Arabella Morrow
Miss Louise .funin [Mrs. Mlllen Griffith
Mm nn7.el King Mrs. Mamie M. Potter
MiM Elisabeth Rrlce | Mrs. K«Jt
Miss Henrletto Plandlng Mrs. Oscar Schulz*
Miss Kate Herrin
* * *
Captain and Mrs. Martin Crimmins
, will entertain at one of the most elab
orate affairs of the week, to be given
in honor of Sir Thomas Lipton ar tbe
Presidio. There will he an informal
dinner preceding the dancing party,
to be given at the Officers' club. About
guests have been bidden to the
dancing party, but the dinner will be
a stag affair at which Captain Crim
mins will preside. The decorations In
the ballroom at the Officers' club will
be entirely in chrysanthemums and
greenery.
* # »
Miss Marian Zeile entertained at an
informal luncheon given yesterday,
when the feted guests were Miss
i Beatrice Nlckef and Miss Correneh de
| Pue, two of the popular debutantes of
the season. A score of the buds were
■ bidden to enjoy the informal reunion.
* # *•
Miss Ethel Jack and her mother,
Mrs. Jack, are at tbe Hotel Court, where
they will remain for an indefinite visit.
During their stay here they are being
entertained by friends.
* # *
Mrs. Kate Stowe Ealand, who is vis
iting here from Santa Barbara, is being
entertained at a series of informal
affairs given by her friends in this
city.
* * *
Mrs. Ewing, accompanied by her
daughters, the Misses Jessie and Flor
ence Ewlng, who left here a few
months ago for New York, where they
joined Miss Grace Ewlng and later
sailed for Europe, are now in London.
They will pass the late winter in Ger
many. Miss Grace Ewing will return
to New York, where she Is engaged
in musical work, but the other mem
bers of the family will return to this
city.
m -:«• -:<•
Edward Connolley returned recently
after an enjoyable trip in New York
* * *
Oacar Beatty. son of Chief Justice
Beatty, who left here last February
for a tour of the world, returned a few
days ago. Mr. and Mrs. Beatty are at
present occupying their new home in
Woodside.
* # *
Dean Wllmer Gresham and Mrs.
Gresham have gone east for a visit of
several weeks, and during the absence
of Dean Gresham Ret. Webster Loring
SLAPS ECHO IN
CARD CLUB CASE
KANSAS CITY, Nov. 20.—Women"*
card parties conducted ' under the
! names of clubs, not requiring a mem
! bership card nor a special invitation,
j were branded a violation of the
! gambling law by Judge Burney in the
j municipal court.
The case in court was that of Mrs.
Laura Setzer, charged with disturbing
M the peace following a quarrel with Mrs.
Frances Thompson at a meeting of the
Progressive High Five club at the
home of Mrs. Connie Stewart, a teacher
in china painting. The courtroom was
filled with women. Witnesses testified
variously that Mrs. Setzer gave Mrs.
Thompson the first slap and vice
versa. After Mrs. Thompson had ad
ministered a friendly but resounding
slap upon the cheek of her attorney
to attest to the severity of the blow
she received, the court discharged the
wemen with a reprimand.
Testimony showed that the - club
often had met in a public hall, that 25
cents had been charged players, and
that as maay as SO women had taken
part In games for prizes. The club
was placed under the ban of the court.
LADIES' RELIEF SOCIETY
TO RECEIVE DONATIONS
OAKLAND. Nov. 20.-~The Ladles'
Relief society will hold an axmual do
nation day Tuesday at 1431 Broadway.
The proceeds in the form of donations
will be devoted to the women and chil
dren under the care of the society.
The headquarters will be kept open
from 9 o'clock until t. It is expected
that many contributions of groceries,
fruit, vegetables nnd fuel will be re
ceived. The contributions will be re
ceived at the headquarters of the day
or at the home at £25 Forty-fifth street
Clarke will be in charge of the pro
cathedral. Mrs. Clarke* has a large
circle ct friends here who will re
member her as Miss Frances Thomp
son.
N.-ws of the death of Mrs. Emma
Hood, that occurred in Boston, has
caused the deepest regret among her
friends in this city. Mrs. Hood was
a frequent visitor here and a charming,
cultivated woman with a large circle of
friends.
Frank Carroll Giffen has sent out
invitations for a concert to be given
Thursday evening. December 6, at Na
tive Sons' hall, when a large audience
of society people will be in attend
ance.
Mi«s Msye Colburn. who has been in
San P.afaeJ during tbe early season. Is
established at the Fairmont for the
winter.
* * *
Leo E. Young, who arrived this weex
from Alaska, will be the guest for two
weeks of his brother. Francis J. Young,
at the home of the latter in Broderick
street.
Mrs. Colin M. Boyd has returned to
her home In Page street after a visit
of several months In the east.
* * #
Mrs. A. W. Bryant has returned to
her home In Brorterick street after a
visit of several days with friends in
Ross \ alley.
The bridge party given yesterday by
the Forum club at the Palace was one
of the most enjoyable affairs of the
season, and was attended by more than
500 guests. The tables were arranged
in the ballroom and in the rose room,
and an informal tea followed the after
noon at cards. There were scores of
attractive gowns to mark the occasion
and the pretty floral settings added to
the brilliant affair. The guests were
received by Mrs. E. G. Denniston. presi
dent of the club, who was assisted by
Mrs. John T. Scott. Mrs. F. & Gabbs,
Mrs. Charles M. Wood. MrsWCharles
Mann and Mrs. S. L Strickland.
* » *
Mrs. Thomas P. Bishop will entertain
at an informal luncheon to be given
this afternoon at her home In Buchanan
street.
# * *
The next dance of the Saturday
Evening assemblies will take place No
vember 20. and will be an elaborate
affair for more than 100 guests. The
initial dancing party was a great suc
cess and the members are looking for
ward to the second reunion In the
winter series. The patronesses for these
assemblies are Mrs. Allen 1,. Green, Mrs.
James Lanagan. Mrs. Stewart McNab,
Mrs. Frank H. Kerrigan. Mrs. William
H. Manaton and Mrs. Dudley D. Sales.
* # *
Dean Wllmer Gresham and Mrs.
Gresham have gone east for a visit of
several weeks, and during the absence
of Dean Gresham Rev. Webster Loring
Clarke will have charge of the pro
cathedral.
JEWISH WOMEN
TO HEAR MUSIC
The regular •monthly meeting of the
Ladles' Auxiliary, Temple Israel, will
be held Monday evening at Temple
Israel. California a!nd Webster streets,
with a musical program to which Mr.
and Mrs. Benno Barnett, Mrs. C. Cross,
Miss Sophia Leon and Mrs. Nathan
Landsberger will contribute. An ad
dress will be made by Miss Etta Bloch.
A thanksgiving will be held Thursday
at the Sunday school, at which Rabbi
Jacob Nleto will deliver an address.
BAZAAR STARTS FRIDAY— The Cbrlatmas he-
Jtaar of the Flrat KngUsa Lutheran chorea will
be held at the church in Geary afreet between
Gough and Octavla atreeta Friday eTpnlug,
Saturday afternoon and evening. The affair
will be given by the Ladles' Aid aoclety.
Makes a great difference in most women. They ere troubled with "nerves"—
they suffer from backache, headache, sleeplessness, a sensation of irritability or
twitching, hot fleshes, dizzy spells, or many other symptoms pf female weakness.
The local disorder and inflammation should be treated with Dr. Pierces Lotion
Tablets and the irregularity and weakness of the female system corrected and
strengthened with Dr. Pierces Favorite Prescription. The strain upon the young
women or the woman of middle age—upon the nerve and blood forming structures—
may be too greet for her strength. This is tbe time to take this restorative tonic
and strength-giving nervine and regulator. For over forty years sold by druggists
for women's peculiar weaknesses end distressing ailments. The erne remedy so perfect
tin composition and so good in curative effects cc to warrant
its makers in printing its every ingredient on its outside
wrapper. The cmc remedy which absolutely contains neither
alcohol nor injurious or habit-forming drugs.
Following letter selected at random from c large number
of similar ones end cited merely to illustrate these remarks:
" In the winter of 180J, I became greatly run down aad irregular."
writes Mas. HmmYjScoTT. of Swaa Greek, Mich.. Bouts L Bex 4*. '*I
slowly but surely grew wane, and, at last, resolved to apply to the dee
top for help. The doctor said I had innammstkm, enlargement and lacer
ation. I was tn bad eleven weeks and get no better. The doctor said I
would have to have an operation, but to that I would not baton. Myhua
hand purchased two bottles of Dr. Pierces Favorite Preemption. When
I started to take this remedy I could not walk across the floor, but after
I bad taken three bottles I could feel myself saintae.ee I dropped the
doctor and took Dr. Pierces Favorite Prescription. Only far ft Tthink
I would have been deed-I really believe it saved say Ufa. I feel better
Mas. SCOTT. now than in twenty rears."
Clarence Porter
Wins Her From
Stage Plan
WOODLAND, Nov, 20.—A romance
which dates from pinafore days, cul
minated today in the announcement of
the engagement of Miss Fair Hager
Curtiss, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.
C. Curtiss, and Clarence Porter, a
youngr business man of this city. The
wedding in the spring will be a large
affair. They will take an extended hon
eymoon trip, touring Europe.
The bride elect, who is 20 years old,
is a beautiful girl of the Maxine El
liott type. Her childhood was spent
in this city, but in 1906 she entered
Mills college In Oakland.
In 1908 she went to Paris, where she
studied music under the noted Jean
de Reske and dancing under Isadore
Duncan. A great future was foretold
for her by De Reske, an<f it was ex
pected by her friends that she would
enter upon a stage career, ttut the call
of love proved too strong.
Miss Curtiss is a sister of Miss Gen
evieve Curtiss and a niece of Mrs. A.
D. Porter of this city, Mrs. Gilbert L.
Curtiss of East Oakland and Mrs.
Henry M. Tico of Claremont. In pio
neer days her father was connected
in farming with Colonel Hager and
.'Senator .lames Fair, hence her name
of Fair Hager Curtiss.
The bridegroom is the son of the
late A. D. Porter, founder of the Yolo
County Savings bank and vice presi
dent of the Yolo County bank. He is
a brother of Mrs. Talbart Ware of
Berkeley, of William Porter of Berk
eley and Henry Porter of this city.
His education was received at tbe
I I'niversity of California, where he was
affiliated with the Theta Delta Chi
fraternity. Porter, who is engaged In
farming, divides his time between this
city and Mexico, where his firm is
farming thousands of acres.
Many engagement parties have been
planned in this city and In San Fran
cisco in honor of the young couple.
Fairness to al}, malice toward none
is the policy of the New Independent
Call.
ROMANTIC LASS
IS LED TO ALTAR
STAMFORD, Conn., Nov. JO.—Wil
liam J. Bricker, who owns a ranch near
Los Angeles, and was divorced some
time ago, traveled across the conti
nent to Stamford, and was married here
today to Miss Claire Mersch of Los
Angeles, who had preceded him.
Miss Mersch is an actress and con
fesses in the license to 27 years. Her
father is Theodore Mersch of Los
Angeles. She Is a pretty woman.
Brlncker is 43 years old. according to
his sworn statement, but doesn't look
it. and is said to be wealthy.
The couple came to Stamford with
Miss Mersoh's sister. Miss Mary Merach
of New York, who Is an actress, and
were married by Justice of the Peace
Tip in the town hall.
Asked why she came to Stamford to
be married, the bride replied that it
lent "romance" to the marriage. Asked
what the romance was, she said she
would not tell that to any newspaper.
Following the marriage, the couple
returned to the New York residence of
Miss Mary Mersch. They expect to
take a European trip before returning
to Los Angeles.
THIS LAWSUIT IS
ALL FEMININE
WAMEGO, Kan., Nov. 20.—Six women,
wives of prominent citizens of Wamego,
comprised the jury in a lawsuit In
which both the plaintiff and defendant
were women and in which the contro
versy was over the ownership of four
white Plymouth Rock pullets
Mrs. George Ralne of Louisville, a
village near here, accused Mrs. Mina
Johnson, a neighbor, with the theft of
the fowls and sued her on the charge.
Mrs. Johnson demanded a trial by a
jury of women.
.The testimony showed that both Mrs.
Johnson and Mrs. Ralne raised white
Plymouth Rock chickens and that they
both allowed their fowls to run at
large. After deliberating two hours the
Jury returned a verdict of not guilty,
basing their decision on the presump
tion that the poultry Of two women liv
ing so close together might easily get
mixed without the connivance of either
owner. The trial attracted a large
crowd.
DINNERS GIVEN
AT CHURCH FAIR
A fair, which opened Tuesday night.
Is being* held at Jackson and Fillmore
streets by the ladles of Calvary Pres
byterian church. It will continue this
afternoon and evening:.
A dinner is served a la carte at 6
p. m. and there are tables at which
many articles, particularly suitable for
Christmas gifts, may be purchased.
Among the patronesses are Mrs.
Frank R. Bass, Mrs. William Rader,
Mrs. A. K. Durbrow, Mrs. Herman, Mrs.
Charles Poole, Mrs. John Stewart, Miss
Alice Corwln, Miss Evelyn Van "Winkle,
Miss Edna,Lingren, Mrs. George Mullen,
Mrs. M. P. Jones. Mrs. H. L Van Win
kle, Mrs. G. P. Thurston, Mrs. Bobbins,
Mrs. Burke Corbet, Mrs. Dunbar, Mr.
McClees and Mr. Hugh I<amont.
Suggestions for Wedding
Presents
rpO the person with a large circle of friends the prob-
I lem of 2 wedding present often becomes almost as
acute both for the brains and the pocketbook as
the what shall I give for Christmas puzzle, especially
in iuch*popular mating times as these autumn months.
Unfortunately I can't help the pocketbook side of
the problem, but I'm going to make bold to offer ,a
few suggestions for the mental part of it.
Since the rebirth of the fireplace is an important
part of the home, andirons, tongs, bellows, in short
anything for the fireplace, is likely to be more than a
welcome gift and*not a particularly common one.
Good reference books, such as a dictionary, an en
cyclopedia, a thesaurus, a book of classical reference
or of quotations make wedding gifts for which the re- ■» -
cipients will probably be grateful to you every time they consult them.
Pictures are a beautiful gift, but a trifle dangerous. However, if you
go to a first class picture store and trust yourself to an intelligent clerk
and tell him to pick out something safe, you can't go very far astray. You .
may not select one of the bride's favorites, but you won't get a picture that
will be banished to the store room and be brought out only for your visit.
Some kind of mirror, a triple toilet mirror, or one of those quaint, old
fashioned gilt affairs, makes a very acceptable gift.
I know one bride who exchanged a picture which she disliked for a
mirror. "You get tired of the best pictures," her mother said, "but you'll
never get tired of that."
Vases appeal to me as an especially attractive gift.
If you like something quaint and a bit different, see what the Japanese
stores have to offer. t
For an inexpensive wedding present I know of nothing that makes a
better showing than half a dozen frappe glasses. As all kinds of desserts can
be served in them they are extremely useful, and they can be bought for
$3 a dozen, up. Several brides have told me that they have enjoyed their
frappe glasses more than any other gift. *
A table mirrof for the center of the table is another inexpensive but
very acceptable present.
Remember that the value of a gift is practically doubled when it is
just wha4 the recipient wants. And if you are sufficiently well acquainted;
ask the bride's mother or sisters, or intimate friends, for suggestions.
Don't be afraid to give something that represents labor instead of
money. People are doing that more every year. No woman can fail to
be delighted with a piece of embroidery; a very pretty shoe case made oi
cretonne to match her .bedroom hangings, pleased one bride as much as
anything she had; a dozen tumblers of hon>emade jelly, accompanied by
a little note saying, "Silver and gold have I none, but such as I have gi\ c [
unto thee," deeply touched and pleased another bride.
Truly the price tag isn't the only thing about a wedding present that
interests the recipient—cynics to the contrary.
POLICEWOMAN OF
LOS ANGELES HERE
Attired in a trim blue suit, a small
hat of the same color and carrying a
small hand satchel, a woman walked
Into the offices of Captain of Detec
tives Mooney yesterday morning and
announced that she had come to take
two runaway girls caught in San
Francisco back to Los Angeles.
"But," said Captain Mooney, doffing
his cap and smiling his most genial
smile, "the chief said that Officer
Shatto would take the girls hack."
"1 am Officer Shatto," said the
woman, and with that she handed
Mooney her card, which read, "Mrs.
Rachel D. Shatto, policewoman, Los
Angeles city."
Mooney finished reading the card,
when he was confronted with a star
bearing No. lie. Without any more
ado, Mooney accepted the warrant
from tbe policewoman and ordered that
the runaway girls be turned over to
Mrs. Shatto this morning.
Mrs. Shatto is the first policewoman
to visit the hall of justice in this city.
Her visit occasioned a deal of surprise.
She has been a member of the Los
Angeles department since July. Three
women are employed In the depart
ment. Mrs. Shatto's work deals with
the juvenile bureau. »
"We are kept very busy," the police
woman declared. "We are in for good,
solid work, and I must say that it haa
been a success. Every police depart
ment should have women employed."
Jeanette Frollch and Pauline Jenks
are the girls whom Mrs. Shatto will
return to the south today. They ran
away from their homes three weeks
ago.
In response to a question propounded
by a curious newspaper man, Mrs.
Shatto said that she never told where
she carried her revolver and hand
cuffs.
WHAT WE GIVE PIANO BUYERS
There is more, much more, than just sell
ing you your • piano, talking machine or
Player Piano at our stores. Every buyer at
any Allen store knows that in buying of our
firm he has settled the musical question for
all time.
First—Because he has the certain knowl
edge that the instrument purchased will ful
fill every claim.musically, mechanically and
in durability.
Second—He has the advantage of a service
department upon which he may call at will
for tuning, regulation or adjustment, and
this service is, for the first year, absolutely
free.
Third—Every buyer here gets not only
quality and service, but also a piano, a
Player Piano or a talking machine that is
of the highest quality purchasable at the
price paid on the Pacific Coast. Back of
every instrument sold is our guarantee as to
quality, service and price. Back of that guar
antee is the entire foundation upon which
our business success has been built.
We know that our methods and our mer
chandise merit your confidence and your sup
port; that you may purchase here at prices
which are the lowest possible, allowing for a
legitimate margin of profit, and on easy pay
ments, instruments that will prove our every
claim. You owe it to yourself to make your
investigation thorough.
VICTOR TALKING MACHINES—SHEET MUSIC
TWO ENTRANCES:
135-153 Kearny and 217-225 Sutter Street
OAKLAND—SIO TWELFTH AND 1200 WASHINGTON
SAIT JOSE—II 7 SOUTH FIRST ST.
Ruth Cameron
! RUTH CAMERON
EQUAL RIGHTS
LEAD TO JAIL
LONDON. Nov. 20.—Two suffragettes
were sentenced in the court of sessions
here today to long terms of Imprison
ment for window smashing. Isabella
Irving was sent up for six months and
Ethel Slade for four months on the
charge of damaging shop windows in
Bond and Oxford streets November 1,,
when they participated In a raid with
other women as a protest against the
rejection by the house of commons of
an amendment providing for woman
suffrage in the home rule bill of Ire
land.
_ _ _ ,
Home Face Peeling "
f Becomes Popular I
(From Fashion Reporter)
No complexion treatment yet discov
ered seems to have become so generally
and ■*> immediately popular as the mer
colized wax process. Evidently the rea
son for this is that this method actu
ally gets rid of .a bad complexion,
which can hardly be said of any other.
To temporarily hide or bleach the de
fective skin with cosmetics, can not
compare with the effect of literally re
moving the skin Itself. Mercolized wax
takes off the offending surface skin In
flour-like particles, a little at a time,
until there's none of It left. The new
complexion thus produced exhibits a
healthy glow and glrliah beauty ob
tainable In no other way. This wax,
which you can get at your druggists.
Is applied at nlgrTt in the same way
you use cold cream, and washed oft
next morning.
Here is the only thing I know of that
actually does remove wrinkles, remove
them quickly, and at trifling cost: Pow
dered saxolite, 1 os., dissolved in % pt.
witch hazel. Use as a face bath.
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