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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, December 04, 1912, Image 2

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GREECE WITHDRAWS
FROM BALKAN PACT
Refuses to Recognize Armistice Signed by Its
Allies and Continues the War
make common cause with Bulgaria,!
Montenegro and Servia against Aus- j
trla. this circumstance, say the ex-j
perts. is not likely to change the re
sult. Austria's only chance is to in
volve Germany and Italy, and Italy has
had enough of war. A late dispatch
from Rome states that the ministry
is evading Austrian persuasions.
A telegram from Berlin states that
Rumania already is pledged to support
Ajistrta and Germany against the Bal
kan alliance- and Russia. Crown
Prince Ferdinand of Rumania, accom
panied by General Albert Robesco, ar
rived in the German capital today and
conferred with Emperor William after
luncheon at the Neve palace, Potsdam.
Tomorrow the prince will be received
by the foreign minister, Herr yon Kid
erlin Wachter, and other minister;"- of
state. The part assigned to Rumania
hy the triple alliance is an invasion of
southern Russia.
RISSIA AWAITS DEVELOPMENTS
Russia lias completed her prepara
tions for war. A St. Petersburg dis
patch says that the Russian govern
ment neither i s moved nor misled hy
Germany's warning. If Servia is at
tacked Russia will have no alternative
but to fight. If. Sazanoff knows this
and he wouM prefer war with Germany
to a revolution at home.
Prince Victor Bonaparte is to be as
signed to the command of an army
corps should war with Germany de
velop. It is believed that with the
head of the French imperialists fight
ing against France's traditional enemy,
France would move across the Rhine
within a week—the imperialists to
emulate the example of the Bonapartist
pretender, the anti-imperialists to stifle
this sentiment by a counter impulse.
It was a mild difference of opinion
among the members of the Ottoman
imperial council, as to the existence of
a condition of "dharoorah," as pre
scribed in the Moslem law. which
caused the delay in authorizing pro
ceedings for an armistice. "Dharoorah""
is the past participle of the Turkish
verb "defeat." The sheik ul Islam is
a member of the Ottoman imperial
council. He alone doubted the Turkey
that had been in the "harooed" in the
better part of Islam in Europe. It took
423 special telegrams from Minister of
War and Commander in Chief Nazim
Pasha at Tchatalja to convince him.
ultimately. that, alas! "dharoorah"
•was knocking at the very door of
Stamboul.
SPECULATION REGARDING GREECE
The refusal of Greece to sign the
armistice is susceptible of different in
terpretations. In the first place, as a
tacit armistice has been in existence
more than a week, it is not impossible
that the negotiations may have served
to bring about an agreement on the
general principles of the peace terms,
such as would promise the speedy ar
rangement of a peace treaty when the
conference meets, as now Is.expected,
in London. In this case the fact that
Greece is standing out from the peace
protocol would not be of great im
portance.
In the second place the Greek ab
stention may mean a serious split
among the allies, arising from jealous
ies concerning the possession cf Salon
iki and the insistence of tne Greeks on
the capitulation of Adrianople, Scu
tari and Janina.
Other factors that may influence the
situation are to be found in the fact
that Turkey recently sought to con
clude a separate treaty of peace with
Greece, that Bulgaria apparently is not
unwilling to enter into an alliance with
Turkey and that the allies are desir
ous that Turkey shall enter the Balkan
customs league.
GREECE MAY CAISE TROUBLE
There is a rumor in Sofia that a sug
gestion has been made to substitute
Rumania for Greece in the Balkan
league. It seems clear from the report
that Bulgaria will ignore the Greek
offpr to land an army in GaWlpoli pen
insula and to send its fleet to attack
the Dardanelles, that the relations be
nd Bulgaria are strained
and these signs of dissension among
the allies leave the situation full of
dangerous possibilities.
It is reported that France is trying
to persuade Greece to adopt a less un
yielding attitude. It is understood
that financial pressure and the ex
haustion of their forces had much to
do with the willingness of Bulgaria
and Servia to conclude peace, and in
tills respect Greece, which secured its
victories with less expense, is better
able to continue hostilities.
A TTITUDE OF SOFIA
Hannoys THE GREEKS
ATHENS, Dec. 3.—Surprise and an
noyance are expressed by the Greek
newspapers at what they term the com
plaisance shown by Bulgaria in ac
cepting the Turkish proposals which
are so advantageous to the Ottoman
empire. It Is contended by many
writers that the complete and definitive
liberation of the Christians in the
orient is obtainable only by combined
land and sea action of the allies against
Constantinople.
U-UND IS FORWARDED
1 FOR WAR PRISONERS
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.—The Ameri
can Red Cross today forwarded 11,000
to the international bureau for the aid
of war prisoners in Belgrade, Servia,
and for Balkan relief work. A telegram
received by the department of state
from Ambassador Rockhill in Constan
tinople reports that conditions there are
normal and that there is a decrease in
the epidemic of cholera.
RUSSIA REFUSES TO
RECOGNIZE ALBANIA
VIENNA,' Dec. 3.—A Neve Freie
Presse dispatch from Constantinople
says that the Russian ambassador has
informed the grand vizier that Russia
could not recognize the independence
of Albania. At nmst, Russia would
agree to the establishment of an auton
omous province under the guarantee of
all the great powers.
PRINCE OF ROUMANIA
VISITS THE KAISER
BERLIN, Dec. 3.—Crown Prince
Ferdinand of Roumania, accompanied
by Genera! Albert Robesco of the Rou
manian army, arrived here unexpected
ly today.
The prince was the guest of Emperor
-
William at luncheon, and in the course
of today and tomorrow will confer
with Albert yon Kiderlen-Waechtcr,
imperial "secretary of foreign affairs,
and other German statesmen.
No announcement regarding the
meaning of Prince Ferdinand's visit
has been made, but the press generally
declares that it would not be wrong
to consider it as a link in the recent
demonstrative chain of visits of
courtesy, which, like the trip of Field
Marshal Baron Conrad yon Hetzendorf,
the inspector general of the Austrian
army in Bucharest, are Intended to in
dicate to the outside world the solidar
ity of the members of the triple al
liance, Germany, Austria-Hungary and
Italy, with Roumania.
T ONDON MAY SECURE
-L-. PEACE CONFERENCE
SOFIA, Bulgaria, Dec. 3.—lt is stated
here that the representatives of the al
lied Balkan nations have acceded to
the request of the Turks that the peace
negotiations take place in London.
King Ferdinand in Kirk-Kilis. De
cember 1, received General Vaver
Pasha, the commander of the Turkish
column which was captured near
Dedeaghatch.
The king returned his sword to
Vaver Pasha and told him that he
could reside where he chose in Bul
garia.
The Turkish commander chose Sofia.
SWISS STORE GRAIN
TO PROVISION ARMY
GENEVA, Switzerland, Dec. 3. —Even
Switzerland seems to be preparing for
the eventuality of war. The federal
government is filling the ! various mili
tary storehouses with wheat and corn
ordered from the United States and
Canada.
HARVESTER TRUST IS
OF GARDEN VARIETY
It Is So « harat'terlzed by Special
Prosecutor for Federal
Government
ST. LOUIS, Dec. 3.—ln an effort to
prove that the International Harvester
company had driven many implement
dealers out of business for refusal to
handle only its output, the government
today, at the hearing of the suit to
dissolve the harvester company, began
the introduction of witnesses who had
handled harvesters and farm machin
ery made by the International.
At the conclusion of the second day's
hearing. Special Agent Darling of the
department of justice said the govern
ment had heard sufficient evidence to
conclude that the harvester trust was
of the "garden" variety. "Garden"
variety of trusts, he explained, were
those that depend alone on -strong
arm" methods to extinguish competi
tion—not those depending on United
States patents.
The government today began the in
troduction of witnesses in an effort
to prove that the International had
driven hundreds of implement dealers
out of business for refusing to handle
only its output.
RUSSIA TO OUTLINE
COMMERCIAL POLICY
When Treaty With United States Ex-
pires January 1, Cznr Will
Announce Future Attitude
ST. PETERSBURG, Dec. 3.—lt is of
ficially announced today that the Rus
sian government will publish on Janu
ary l, the day of the expiration of the
Russo- American treaty of commerce
and navigation, a statement outlining
its future commercial policy toward the
United States and also a provisional
tariff which will not contain any great
increase over the existing tariff. The
policy of the Russian government, it is
said, will not be imbued by any spirit
of animosity, but will be directed solely
to the protection of the Russian mar
kets and to assuring the Russian con
sumer the most favorable _:>nditions of
supply of the staple imports hitherto
coming direct from the United States,
namely, cotton, farm machinery and im
plements.
RIVERS AND HARBORS
CONGRESS IN SESSION
"Hen of Prominence in Thin Country and
Canada Will I'rjse Appropri-
ation!- For Waterways
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.—Delegates
gathered hf»re in large numbers from
all parts of the country today to at
tend the opening sessions tomorrow of
the ninth annual convention of the
National Rivers and Harbors congress.
An interesting program has been pre
pared, and men of prominence in both
this country and Canada will urge upon
congress the necessity of adequate ap
propriations for waterway improve
ment. Senator elect Ransdell of Louisi
ana, president of the congress, said to
night that the convention would urge
upon the federal congress that here
after great waterway projects be com
pleted as rapidly as they can be, con
sistent with practical business sense,
and within a definite period of years.
MILITARY FELONS APPEAL
Fll&bt to Jail West Virginians Fought
in Supreme Court
CHARLESTON, W. Va.. Dec. 3,—The
acts of Governor Glasscock's military
commission, which tried and sentenced
persons convicted of misdoings in the
martial law districts of the Kanawha
coal field, were questioned in the su
preme court of appeals of West Vir
ginia today when attorneys for S. F.
Nance and L. A. Muys began habeas
corpus proceedings to prftcure their
release from the Moundsvllle peniten
tiary. The men are serving sentence*
of five and two years, respectively.
The petition declares the governor
had no right under the constitution to
declare martial law and that the sen
tences imposed by the military com
mission were illegal. Arguments will
be heard Dacembdr 17.
KRAMER ARRESTED AFTER
DESPERATE RESISTANCE
Alleged Accessory Aftsr Fact in Rosen
thal Shooting is Beaten Into
Insensibility
CHICAGO. Dec. 3.—Samuel Kramer,
wanted in New York as accessory after
the fact in the Rosenthal murder, was
arrested here today by detectives, after
a desperate resistance, in which Kra
mer was beaten into unconsciousness.
Acting on telegraphic information from
New York, the detectives found Kramer
hiding in a house in the west side levee.
rpTTTT' aA AT I'D * VOTdno na T T TTTTTTiXncaTI A V TYIFnTP.AIiaTPT? I. IQIO
Big Fortune in Soap Suds
But "Bubble" May Burst
"Billy" McGuire, who has been successful in extracting gold out of
Nevada, out of oil and out of taxicab companies, is now going to
extract it out of soapsuds. He is going to utilize the vast waste inci
dent to laundrying and will skim the dainty top off the steaming tubs,
condense the scum and remold it nearer to the form of cakes of soap.
As a Palace hotel poet has put it metrically:
"Billy lilies to work with suds; he really feels at home
In facing suds in tub or likes to blow the foam.
Imagine a lake of soap suds, steaming on the fire.
Having the soap extracted by handsome Bill McGuire."
And, really, that.is pretty good poetry for a Palace hotel poet to
reel off.
Wellington Gregg, cashier of the Crocker National bank, put Mc-
Guire in the way of a new fortune.
Last week a man came "to the Crocker bank -with a scheme for
doubling its resources. He wanted the bank to finance his operations
in the soapsuds field. There were, he said, 8,755 laundries in San
Francisco, and each one used 497 cakes of soap a week. Part of this
soap dissolved in water in the work of washing San Francisco's linens
and silks and calicoes, but a lot of it went unseparated into soapsuds
and was cast off. His plan was to accumulate all the soapsuds of the
city, extract the water from the bubbles, and the residue would be
soap again.
William H. Crocker, president of the bank, wasn't in the day the
man called, so his plan was unfolded to Wellington Gregg. Gregg liked
the idea, but thought that the Crocker bank didn't want to make too
much -money —it might make the national treasury jealous, and that
would be awful, so he said it was prudent for the bank -to pass the
scheme up.
But his friend, Billy McGuire, former assemblyman and contem
porary millionaire, really was ambitious to emulate Rockefeller, and
Gregg would give him the chance.
McGuire liked the idea. He and the inventor of the scheme are
busy now experimenting on the proposition by blowing soap bubbles
and seeing how much they assay to the inch diameter.
LOS ANGELES IS STILL
STRONG FOR FREE LUNCH
"Antis" Are Beaten Badly-
New Charter Fails to
Carry
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 8— The good
government element, which has been
the dominant factor in municipal poll
tics since it bfought about the recall
of Mayor Harper four years ago, suf
fered its first important defeat today,
when the proposed nfew city charter,
which provided many, new govern
mental theories, was defeated by a vote
of more than two to one. With 18
precincts out of a total of 455 unre
ported, the vote was:
Yes, 15,702; no, 33,711.
The result of the election came as
a tremendous surprise- to the pro
gressive leaders of Los Angeles, who
had taken a prominent part in the
framing of the charter, and they at
tributed its defeat to overconfidence
on the part of its friends, who, be
lieving it was certain to be ratified,
failed to vote. Less than a third of
the registered vote of the city was cast.
The antl free lunch ordinance, which
was submitted to the people on a ref
erendum petition, was likewise de
feated. The vote was 15,053 for the
ordinance and 31,939 against It.
Voters of the harbor section of the
city, including the former .owns of San
Pedro and Wilmington, rejected pro
hibition, voting to continue "wet" by
a majority of 272 out of approximate
ly 2,000 votes.
Analysis of the vote on the city
charter shows that a favorable vote
was cast in but 17 precincts. In some
precincts the vote in favor of it was
almost negligible.
Opponents of the charter said tonight
that its defeat was due to the wide
powers it would have vested in th*
four proposed commissioners and its
failure to give the power of veto to
the mayor.
Prominent in the framing of the
charter were Meyer Llssner, the pro
gressive republican leader, and John
R. Haynes, who has been called the
father of the initiative, referendum and
recall in California.
Incomplete returns Indicate that the
harbor zone voted "wet" by a majority
of about 150.
TRUTH OF VETERANS'
CHARGES ADMITTED
Governor of Soldiers' Home at Sawteile
Lays Blame on Board of Gen
eral Managers
LOS ANGELES, Dec. 3.—Colonel T. J.
Cochrane, governor of the soldiers'
home at Sawtelle, admitted the truth of
many of the, charges made against the
management of the home while on the
stand today in the "senatorial investi
gation, but laid much of the responsi
bility for the home's shortcomings on
the board of general managers in New
York. The governor was on the stand
nearly the entire day, and Senators
Jones, Chamberlain and Catron alter
nated in quizzing him. Some of the
questions and comments of the senators
were apparently embarrassing to the
executive head of the home. It was
announced that the hearing would be
closed tomorrow or Thursday.
JERSEY LADS AT PLAY
CAUSE $300,000 FIRE
HOBOKEN, N. J.. Dec. 3. —Five small
boys, the oldest 14 years old, and the
youngest 9, were responsible for a
$500,000 blaze in the factory district
here Saturday night. According to the
story, the boys were looking for wood
for a bonfire, and, seeing a box of
excelsior in the yard of a piano factory,
thought it would be fun to see it on
fire and "see the engines go out."
The younger boys will probably be
let off with a reprimand, but the two
older ones will be arraigned for arson.
How to Look Years
Less Than Your Age
(From The Dermatologist.>
The most aged face will look years
younger after the use of ordinary mer
collzed wax for from 10 days to two
weeks. This remarkable substance, be
cause of its peculiar absorptive power,
actually removes the thin veil of faded
or withered outer cuticle, a little at a
time. Gradually the fresher, more
youthful skin underneath Is revealed.
This absorption process being a purely
hygienic one, an entirely natural com
plexion is acquired—quite different
from the artificial complexion, which
appears anything but girlish, though
often bearing painful evidence of child
ishness. An ounce of mercolized wax,
obtainable at any drug store, is suffi
cient to rejuvenate any complexion. It
3s put on like cold cream at bedtime,
and removed mornings with warm,
sudsy water.
To eradicate such age marks as
wrinkles and furrows make a wash lo
tion by dissolving an ounce of pow
dered saxollte in a half pint witch
hazel. This has wonderful astringent
and tonic properties. It quickly effaces
all kinds of wrinkles, no matter how
caused, making the skin firm, smooth
and young looking.
FORESTRY COURSES IN
SCHOOLS RECOMMENDED
Association Concludes Con
ference With Selection of
Next Meeting Place
SEATTLE, Wash., Dec. 3. —The West
ern Forestry and Conservation asso
ciation concluded its third annual for
est fire conference today with the se
lection, subject to approval by the
board of trustees, of Vancouver, B. C,
as the next meeting place. The con
ference adopted committee reports
recommending forestry courses in pub
lic schools, liberal state appropriations
for forest patrols, good roads in timber
districts, railroad co-operation in fire
prevention, home rule in forest ques
tions, nonpolitical appointments of
forest workers, extension of state for
est work and reform in taxation of
standing timber.
Discussing the taxation question, E.
G. Ames of Seattle said the tax rate on
standing timber in this state, amount
ing in 1911 to 80 cents an acre, was so
high that it forced the timber owners
to cut their timber as rapidly as pos
sible regardless of economical methods
and conservation of the supply. Ames
advocated a method of taxation by
which the timber would not be taxed
until cut.
The following officers were elected:,
President. A. L. Flewelllng of Spokane; secre
tary, G. N. Cornwall of Portland: treasurer. A.
W". Lair, cf I'otlatch. Idaho; forester, E. T.
Allen of Portland. Vice prf-idents—Montana.
G. W. Millett of Kflispell; Idaho, B. J. Davies
of Coeur d'Alene; Washington. B. O. Ames of
Seattle; Oregon, A. P. Spragne of Portland;
California, Miles Stan<Jlsh of San Francisco.
Trustee!"— John K. Toole of Missoula, Mont.; T.
J. Humbird of Sand Point. Idaho; George 8.
T.ong of Tacoma. F. C. Kaapp of Portland and
John H. Quoai of McCloud, Cal.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF THE
ANGLO & LONDON PARIS
NATIONAL BANK
OF SAN FRANCISCO
AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS NOVEMBER 26, 1912
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts $21,213,772.57
U. S. Bonds to secure circulation at Par 2,500,000.00
Other U. S. Bonds at Par 50,000.00
Other Bonds •. 3,189,766.14
Other Assets 320,000.00
Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit 1,368,409.02
Cash and Sight Exchange 12,763,279.36
$41,405,227.09
LIABILITIES
Capital Stock .: $4,000,000.00
Surplus and Undivided Profits 1,811,948.28
Circulation 2,500,000.00
Letters of Credit, Domestic and Foreign 1,368,409.02
Deposits 31,724,869.79
$41,405,227.09
OFFICERS
Sig. Greenebaum, Chairman of the Board
Herbert Flelshhacker President
Washinjrton Dodge Vice President
J. Friedlander Vice President
Ot F. Hunt ► Vice President
R. Altsehnl Cashier I H. Choynski Asst. Cashier
C. R. Parker Asst. Cashier! G. R. Burdlck Asst. Cashier
Win. H. tilurh Asst. Cashier! G. F. Herr Asst. Cashier
A. L. Langerntaß Secretary
THE CROCKER NATIONAL DANK
OF SAN FRANCISCO
CONDITION AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS NOVEMBER 26, 1912.
RESOURCES
Loans and Discounts * $18,011,971.14
U. S. Bonds 2,030,000.00
Other Bonds and Securities 781,548.05
Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 670,656.01
Cash and Sight Exchange 7,212,595.56
$28,706,770.78
LIABILITIES
Capital $2,000,000.00
Surplus and Undivided Profits 2,780,420.33
Circulation 1,969,997.50
Letters of Credit 717,257.08
Deposits • 21,239,095.87
$28,706,770.78
OFFICERS
WM. H. CROCKER - • ••■••■ ; •*•"-*' •» President
CHAS. E. GREEN Vice President G. W. EBNER ..Asst. Cashier
JAS. J. FAGAN Vice President W. R. BERRY Asst, Cashier
W. GREGG JR Cashier .1. B. McCARGAR..... .Asst. Cashier
C. F. BAKER Asst. Cashier B. P. DEAN ...Asst. Cashier
JOHN CLAUSEN •• • • • -Manager Foreign Dept.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
WM H CROCKER CHAS. E. GREEN
C-HARI-EH T. CROCKER W. GREGG JR.
FRANK G. DRUM A. F. MORRISON
JAS J FAGAN "HENRY T. SCOTT
ja-5. j. GEORGE W. SCOTT
MOTT CHASED TQ CHINA
STANDS BY ACTRESS
Rich New Yorker, Who
Eloped on Tramp Steamer,
to Live in Orient
Continued From Page 1
after the* Indradeo sailed, thanks to a
Peninsula and Orient boat which he
caught at Port Said. He soon learned
the Indradeo had gone direct to Manila,
and upon arriving there he was able
to read in the Manila newspapers of the
visit paid to the insular capital by his
quarry. They spent rhany pleasant
moments at the Manila hotel and were
the objects of much attention and com
ment there until the Indradeo sailed
for China, where they left the ship.
At Shanghai hotels Mrs. Bowne be
came young Mott's "aunt" and, al
though every one in the city knew
the true story, they lived serenely as
Mrs. Bowne and nephew.
The captain of the Indradeo was se
verely reprimanded by the owners of
his vessel, but voting Mott promised
the skipper before leaving his ship
that if he were discharged he would
buy and. fit out a finer boat and give
full command to his benefactor.
Young Mott is the son of the found
er of the Mott Iron works In New York,
a Harvard man, a writer of blood cur
dling tales and a driver of fast auto
mobiles.
Mrs. Bowne is known as an actress,
a woman of wonderful personality, and
with a strong strain of imagination
which evidently appealed to young
Mott.
PLACERVILLE PIONEER
DIES AT AGE OF 92
Abraham Darlington Took Part in
Stirring Events of Early Days
In El Dorado
PLACERVILLE. Dec. a.—Abraham
Darlington, the oldest continuous resi
dent of El Dorado county, and one of
its most respected pioneers, died at his
ranch at Weher Creek yesterday even
ing of heart trouble and general decline
at the age of 92. Darlington was a
native of New Jersey and came to
California in 1850. For about 30 years
he kept a general store in Placerville,
but he retired from active business
life in 1880. In the early days he
helped in the extermination of the last
remnant of the notorious band of out
laws led by Joaquin Murleta. At that
time he was keeping store at Weber
Creek and .the bandits planned to hold
him up and rob it. News of the in
tended attack leaked out and when the
robbers appeared in the store they
faced a force of sheriff's officers who
were hidden behind boxes and barrels.
A revolver battle ensued and one of
the bandits was killed and the then
sheriff, Baker, was wounded.
CUBAN SUES FOR DIVORCE
>»-pbe-T of President Fleet of Republic
Uses Wife's Maiden Name
Special Dispatch to The Call
"RENO, Dec. 3. —Saul Lombard y
Menecal of New York, nephew of Mario
Menecal, successful presidential can
didate of the conservative party at
the Cuban election in November, has
filed a suit for divorce in the Reno
courts, charging Olivia Lombard of
New Yor* with having deserted him
two weeks after their marriage. He
was married in New York and is suing
for divorce under the name of Saul
Lombard.
"ienr Postmaster for San Jos*
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.—President
Taft today sent to the senate nomina
tions of the following to be postmas
ters: C. A. Connolly, Independence,
Kan., and John R. Chace, San Jose, Cal.
- IP'
WINTER OVERCOATS
STEIN-BLOCH
MADE THEM
$25, $30, $35 and $40
ROBERT S. AKTINS
168 Sutter Street
Near Kearny
THE BANK Of CALIf ORNIA
National Association of San Francisco
STATEMENT OF CONDITION OF
THE BANK OF CALIFORNIA, N. A.,
San Francisco
Including Its Branches in Portland,
Seattle, Tacoma and Virginia City
AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS NOVEMBER 26, 1912
. 4
ASSETS
Loans and Discounts $30,213,468.81
Bank Premises (San Francisco and Branches).., 1,166,769.26
Other Real Estate 484,000.00
Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 3,210,654.13
Sundry Bonds and Stocks 4,626,622.77
United States Bonds to Secure Circulation 5,037,500.00
Other United States Bonds 285,000.00
Redemption Fund with U. S. Treasurer 250,000.00
Cash and Sight Exchange 14,544,026.72
$59,818,041.69"
LIABILITIES
Capital Paid in Gold Coin $8,500,000.00
Surplus and Undivided Profits 7,922,619.52
Circulation 4,968,997.50
Letters of Credit 3,313,800.68
Other Liabilities 429,852.08
Deposits .34,682,771.91
$59,818,041.69
Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank
OF SAN FRANCISCO
STATEMENT OF CONDITION
At the Close of Business November 26, 1912
ASSETS
Loans and Discounts $20,991,638.79
United States Bonds 6,199,052.70
Other Bonds 3,569,359.31
Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit 2,227,480.47
Bank Premises, Furniture and Fixtures 2,258,642.96
Money on Hand $3,857,257.84
Due from Banks 8,686,189.30 12,543,447.14
Redemption Fund with U. S. Treasurer 300,000.00
$48,089,621.37
LIABILITIES
Capital $6,000,000.00
Surplus and Undivided Profits 5,131,055.03
Letters of Credit, etc...: 2,284,532.35
National Bank Notes Outstanding 5,954,995.00
Reserved for Taxes 94,709.71
Deposits 28,624,329.28
$48,089,621.37
State of California | __
City and County of San Francisco l
I. FRANK B. KING, Cashier of the above named Bank, do solemnly
swear that the above statement Is true to the best of my knowledge
and belief. FRANK B. KING. Cashier.
Subscribed and swsrn to before me this 3rd day of December, 1912.
(Seal) O. A. EGGERS,
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco.
Correct —Attest: F. W. Van Sicklen, Joseph Sloss, A. Chrlsteson.
OFFICERS:
ISAIAS W. HELLMAN, President
I. W. HELLMAN JR- Vlce-Pres. E. 1.. JACOBS, Aaat. Cashier
F. 1.. LIPMAN. Viee-Pres. C. 1.. DAVIS, Asst. t ashler
JAMES K. WILSON, Viee-Pres. A. D. OLIVER, Asst. Cashier
FRANK B. KING, Cashier A. B. PRICE, Aaat. Cashier
W. McGAVIN, Asst. Cashier
DIRECTORS:
ISAIAS W. HELLMAN L W. HELLMAN JR. J. HENRY MEYER
JOSEPH SLOSS A. CHRISTESON A. H. PAYSON
PERCY T. MORGAN WM. HAAS CHAS. J. PEERING
F. W. VAN SICKLEN H. E. LAW JAMES K. WILSON
WM. F. HEBBIN HENRY ROSENFELD F. L. LIPMAN
JOHN C. KIRKPATRICK JAMES L. FLOOD
Want to Trz-de, Buy or Sell? Use CALL Want Ada "* *

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