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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 05, 1913, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1913-01-05/ed-1/seq-2/

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The SEMI-MONTHLY MAGAZINE SECTION
A Magazine for your Reading Table
CONTRINUTING EDITORS' PAGE
Mr. H. Addington Bruce
Thinking Hard and
Keeping Young
H. Addington Bruce
FROM a purely physical point of view,
Charles w.' Eliot, President Emer
itus of Harvard University, is un
questionably one of the most remarkable
men in the United states. Approaching
his eightieth year, everybody marvelled at
his temerity in undertaking a voyage
around the world; everybody marvelled
still more at his speedy recovery from a
dangerous surgical Operation, performed
before bis world .journey was half done,
hut not preventing him from carrying it
to a successful completion.
Naturally, people wonder how he does
it — what the secret is of his health, his
longevity. No doubt the blessing of a
good heredity has had somewhat to do
with it; no doubt also he has been aided
by always leading the temperate life.
Mut there is another factor that has
COttnted for more than either of these —
and that is the fact that President Eliot
think*. This is something that we can not
too firmly bear in mind, or take too di
rectly home to ourselves in drawing up
New Year resolutions.
Mental Exercise Pays
IpXKRCI.SE your body if you will —
that can not harm you, and is pretty
sure to do you a great deal of good, lint
whatever else you do or neglect to do,
keep thinking. The well-established law
of the physical universe that a machine
tends to rust out more quickly than to
wear out holds equally good in the psychi
cal sphere.
It is no mere coincidence that most of
the great thinkers of the world —whether
in philosophy, science, industry, litera
ture, or the arts — have lived to be old
men, despite the fact that in youth they
were in many instances physical weak
lings. Significant, too, is the fact that
the majority of them began to think,
began to exercise their minds along the
lines in which they ultimately achieved
greatness, while they were still young.
There is here a pregnant hint for parents.
Whatever aptitude, whatever special
interest, your child chances to display, en
courage him in it. Don't deaden his de
sire for knowledge, his instinctive ten
dency to think, by indifference, by failure
to answer his incessant bombardment of
questions. Rather thank Cod that your
child has an active mind, ami set about
training him in the proper use of it.
Teach him the principles of observation.
of analysis, of synthesis — the principles,
in short, of truly effective thinking. Ac
custom him to thinking things out for
himself, and seek to interest him in what
ever it is well for him to know. You
need not be afraid that he will overtax
his mind. No child's mind — and no
man's either—is overtaxed by anything
in which a real interest is taken.
Deep Thought is Wholesome Thought
r V H X trouble with most of us is that
* we are not really interested in any
thing. We lmve interests, to be sure; but
CONTENTS
COVER DESIGN—"THE BARNYARD LORD"
THINKING HARD AND KEEPING YOUNG— Editorial ....
li. ADDINGTON BRUCE 2
LOOKING FORWARD TO THE NEXT NUMBER 2
THE BRASS TACKS OF ADVENTURE . JOSEPH BOARDMAN, JR. 3
Illustration? bp Frederic l>t>rr Steele
SCENTING BIG GAME . . . Drairn bo ALICE BEACH WINTER 4
HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR HOLIDAY POULTRY ANNA BIRD STEWART B
Illustrations from Photographs hy Helen 1). Van F.aton
THE CONFIDENCES OF ARSENE LUPIN . . MAURICE LEBLANC 6
THE INVISIBLE PRISONER
Illustrations bp Adrien Machefert
HENS THAT CUT THE COST OF LIVING . EDWARD I. FARRINGTON 8
Illustrations from Photographs
NEW WRINKLES 10
____! -:. _j__^ 1
____SB_____r' "_l' 'II lv ,wW| I" .1 T~ "HP^~_i_i_f?_______l
Every Business —Every Home
More light and better light—more work and better work
in offices, factories and stores. More light and better light
—more comfort and better evening enjoyment in homes.
All this is now possible for Everybody— for even the
cottage and the small place of business-by means of the
Edison Mazda Lamp
This lamp makes electric light Economy and Efficiency
cost only one-third as much as it iflfffl ' -~ ~ , .
did five years ago. i&__ Edinpn Mazdas give, not only
Today-compared with even fMM\ light, but whiter, brighter,
the be/t lamp of any other type /if \ Iff
—it gives more then twice as / M \ eve stia,n ext . ra working em
mud light without adding a / O \ ciency-more pleasant shopping
penny to your bill. "7 A \ -more good cheer at home.
They cost a bit more than old- / |l I I \ Electric Wiring Costs Little
style lamps. But they are so / j||| I 1
sturdy and give so much more l ' f'lnil I Electric wiring has been so
light from the same amount of V J simplified that any house or store
electricity that they pay for can now be wired with little an
themselves three times over. noyance and at slight expense.
Ask any lighting'company or dealer about wiring and the styles and
sizes of the Edison Mazdas you need to make your place of business
more successful and your home more homelike. Inquire today.
General Electric Company
Largest Electrical Manufacturer m the World
Sales Offices in all large cities Lamp Anericies Everywhere >_»*«s.
Advertising i» tlie gale-waj l<> g wine (inrchasc.
iliov are diffuse, thin, weak — they do not
grip us. Thai is why comparatively few
of us ever think in the true sense of the
term. Thai is why, when we aw called
upon to do anything In the nature of sus
tained mental effort, we are overwhelmed
by doubt, tear, worry; and mayhap have
finally to call in the doctor with bis sage
pronouncement: "Poor fellow, he lias
been thinking too hard." In point of
fact, we have not been thinking al all,
simply because we have not been inter
ested enough to think.
Let us yet truly Interested in some
thing— no great matter what it is — In
terested in it in the way President Eliot
h.-is been interested in his problems of
university administration and social re
form, and we shall find that we run think
about it easily enough. And, thinking
about it — definitely, tirelessly, earnestly
thinking about it—we shall find ourselves
grow both in mental and bodily vigor.
Looking Forward to the Next
Number
HELLO IS SO much more genial
easy to say than (lood-bve that \v?w
will not take space in reviewing!
the twenty-four semi-monthly entertain*
mentS the Magazink SECTION has given
its great family of readers ami friends
during 1912. Thousands of letters from
all parts of the world are the best evi
dence as to our widening family circle
and its unanimous feeling. So we will
step right into 1913 witli the promise of
twenty-four better and brighter, if not big
ger, magazines than ever have gone into
the nearly two million homes that tlie
next Skmi-Monthly starts in visiting.
As a smiling introduction is an J.ll
Owen Johnson story — Keeping I J> a ilk
IVattiiillf — a story taken verbatim from
the Log of the Mar and Bottle Club.
Mark Twain, were he still walking the
world, might humorously regret having
neglected to write this story himself.
Watt iville, incidentally, is not the name
of a town, but of a man—-a wry club
bable man who sleeps in Philadelphia and
lives in New York. His waking hours,
with which this waist-straining story is
exclusively concerned, are a rollicking
revelation. The story, by the author of
Stover (it Yule, among many other good
things, is wittily 'illustrated by Oscar
Cesare, the famous cartoonist of the Sun.
Continuing the exploits of November
Joe: Woodsman Detective, is Tin Mi/.s
terff of Fletcher Buclman, by Heaketh
I'richard — another thrilling adventure in
crime and its detection in the Canadian
wilds. Mr. Prichard. in his series of
new-idea detective yams appearing exclu
sively in the Skmi .Monthly Magazine
Xkction, has succeeded in making each
successive tale a bit more intense and
compelling in interest than the one pre
ceding. The illustrations are by Percy
K. Cowen.
in Needed — More Than a FaUtafflan
.irmii, Major-Genera] Leonard Wood con
tributes an editorial with a ringing note
of warning. War, [deads the t'hief-of-
Staff of the United States Army, comes
in a Hash, not gradually — and prepared
ness is the only thing that approximates a
insurance against it. General Wood urge/i
the necessity of 600,000 men being sulli
ciently trained for battle service on short
notice.
Hardly so serious, as the title indi
cates, is Frivolous Business, ■ neverthe
less rememberable article by Charles W.
Mears. It has in it food for thought as
well as for chuckles -and so have the
Very ingenious pictures drawn by Horace
Taylor. Then - but why show all the
cards in the index! It's studded with
trumps, not only for the next number,
but for the next year — each number
ahead having the promise of being better
and brighter than the one behind.

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