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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 06, 1913, Image 1

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Highest Temperature YrMerday-. 40: liorrest Saturday
>!Bhl. "«. For rtetniU «»f the Wvxther nee Page 12.
The San Francisco Bank Clearings for the week
ending January 4 were
$ e 4,f97,*32.63
As against $50,047,284.78 for the same
week in 1912
* VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 37.
POWERS TAKE
STEPS WHICH
PROMISE END
OF DEADLOCK
Fhrough Ambassadors in
London and Constanti
nople, European Nations
Exert Strong Pressure on
Sublime Porte in Favor of
Moderation With View to
Understanding That the
Balkan Envoys Can Con
cur In as Basis of Peace
EXPECTED RUPTURE
MAY BE PREVENTED
Unless Some Sudden Change
Develops Turkey Will Pre
sent New Terms at To
day's Conference Designed
to Pave Way for Another
Rectification of Thracean
Frontier, Which Will In
clude Ceding of Adrian-
cple and Crete to Allies
LONDON, Jan. s.—The danger of a
rupture tomorrow of peace negotia
tions seems to have beei. > averted by
the probability that Turkey will make
fresh concessions which will allow the
allies to enjoy a holiday during the
festivities in connection with the
Christmas celebration of the orthodox
church.
From authoritative sources It Is
stated that the powers, through their
ambassadors here and In Constanti
nople, have exerted strong pressure in
Constantinople in favor of moderation,
the Balkan representatives have ;
l^en urged to be patient before break- i
ing off negotiations, especially as they
ran lose nothing by waiting, their po
sition being stronger than that of Tur
key.
KPFORTS OF POWERS SI CCEED
The efforts of the powers appear to
fcave been successful on both sides.
Thus, unless some sudden change
develops at the last moment, Reschid
Pasha will present, Monday, new terms,
which will comprise another rectifica
tion of the Thracean frontier, bringing
it farther east, perhaps to Dedeagalch,
but not yet Including Adrianople, and
possibly the cession of Turkey's rights
rete, directly to the allies.
After representations had been made
to them, Doctor Daneff, Premier Veni- j
Kflos, ML Novakovitch and M. Miyus
koTltcfa met today and decided to give
Turkey a further period of grace, tak
ground that the submission of
terms will be proof of a dispo
ion on the part of Turkey to reach
a satisfactory solution.
MIST CEDE A.DRIANOPLE
They propose to submit the new
terms to their governments for study
and await further instructions, and will
suggest an adjournment of the confer
ence probably until Friday, the third
day after their Christmas, at the same
time emphasizing the absolute neces
sity of Turkey meeting the terms of
the allies, particularly with respect to
Adrianople.
The powers continue to exercise pres-
re in Constantinople, aiming to dem
onstrate to the porte that resistance
only would lead to graver losses.
The impression Is that Turkey will
end by ceding Adrianople. and that this
will be done without any serious re
pults, such as are predicted by Turkish
sympathizers, or threatened by Con
stantinople.
"Whenever Turkey is about to suffer
territorial amputation the specter of
Mussulman fanaticism is raised and as
sistance !s sought from Great Britain
and France, which have in their do
minions millions of Mussulmans, who
are pictured as being ready to rise iv
sympathy.
-NO RiS|\<;s rcVER CO>IK
The Turkish empire, however, gradu
ally has been dismembered without the
Mussulman dragon ever awakening
■•either at abroad, and experts
:fairs interpret this to
that the Mussulmans themselves
invinced that they Care Wetter un
der their present rulers.
Advancement has been made by Rus
sia and France in their etTorts to induce
Jtaly to use its good offices in Vienna.
with the object of turning over Scutari
to Montenegro instead of Including that
town in Albania. It is believed that
Italy, as the ally of Austria, and also
because of the relationship between the
Savoy and Afpntenegrin royal families,
may succeed in accomplishing , this,
while X the same proposition were
urged by the administrations in Paris
and St. Petersburg it might assume the
character of the triple entente opposing
tii- triple alliance.
"The People's Newspaper ,,
CENTENARIAN AND
STILL AT WORK
"Auntie* Louisa' Morgan, 102
Years Old, Tells Judge Her
Labor Supports Niece
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
PITTSBURG, Pa., Jan. s.—"Auntie"
Louisa Morgan, 102 years old, appeared
in court as a witness and in a clear
voice testified that she worked to sup
port an Invalid niece.
Auntie Morgfan was born In Wales
July 23, 1811. She recalls the night
i ferar father and threo brothers went to
; the battle of Waterloo. The brothers
I never came back. The father was
wounded in the side, but lived to be
I 112 years o!J. Her mother died at the
agre of 111 years.
This venerable woman smokes four
or five pipes of strong tobacco each
day.
"I didn't start smoking: until I was
nearly 75," she said today. "I found it
soothed me some nights when I could
not sleep soundly."
BRIDGIE WEBBER'S PAL
HELD IN OPIUM NET
Suitcase of Drug; and Smoking; Pnra-
phrrnalia Found tn San Fran
cisco Lodging House
J. Morris, thought to be a former as
sociate of "Bridgie" Webber, who was
connected with the Rosenthal murder
case, and Robert Lelthold were ar
rested early yesterday morning in a
lodging house at 228 Jones street and
charged with violating the federal
opium laws. They had a suitcase full
of opium smoking paraphernalia, in
cl'iding several cans of the drug.
The capture of the men followed
12 hours oX work by Detective la
Place, whose attention was first drawn
to them by their suspicious care of a
suitcase on the street.
Mi'iris boasted that he had left New
York with Webber, whose flight kept
the police of the nation on the look
out for him In the early days of the
trial of Police Lieutenant Becker.
MAJ. DAINGERFIELD DEAD
Brother In Law of Keene Never Knew
of Financier's EikT
(Specia! Dispatch to The Call)
LEXINGTON, Ky., Jan. s.—Major
Foxall Alexander Daingerfield, scholar,
soldier, sportsman of the old school
and the first and foremost of the men
in this couTitxy in the application t>t
j the knowledge and* science of breeding
thoroughbred running horses, died In
a hospital in this city today. Major
Daingerfield was the brother in law of
James R. Keene and was the manager
of that distinguished financier's great
stud of thoroughbred horses. He never
knew of Keene's death.
FORMER OFFICER TAKEN
Erstwhile Member of Stockton Force
Accused of Stealing Flour
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
STOCKTON, Jan. s.—John Sawyer,
formerly a member of the Stockton
police department and later constable
of Stockton township, was arrested
today by Detective Jack Donahue at
his home in the northwestern section of
the city on a charge of stealing more
than 500 sacks from a local flour mill.
Sawyer was employed as night watch
man at the mill.
LANDSCAPE ARTIST HELD
Peculiar Actions of Anthony Hunt at
White House Cause Detention
WASHINGTON, Jan. s.—Peculiar ac
tions of Anthony Hunt of the fashion
able north shore suburb of Chicago,
landscape artist and member of the
University club of that city, while at
the "White house late today In an ef
fort to see President Taft, caused his
arrest by the police. He is being held
for examination as to his mental con
dition.
THREE SHOT IN HOLDUP
nighnavman Killed and Companion
Woanded In Pistol Duel
SEATTLE, Wash., Jan. s.—John
Moore, 30 years old, was killed; Ed
Collins, 27, was shot In the neck, and
John Byliings, a Snohomish policeman,
was shot In the leg early this morning
in a pistol battle that began when
Moore and Collins attempted to hold
up a saloon at .Snohomish, a town 30
miles north of her<\
81; ILL FOR FIRST TIME
John Bnmn. ISoted Painter of Boy
Life, Indieposed
(Special Dispatch to The Cill)
NEW YORK, Jan. s.—For the first
time in his 81 years John Brown, the
well known painter, whose specialty
nas been depicting of boy life, is con
fined to his home by illnerts. His con
dition early in the week alarmed hia
family. Brown attributes his freedom
t rora bodily ailments in his fourscore
years to his love of exercise and his
simplicity in living.
CUSPIDOR CENSUS TAKEN
Uouv of Representatives "Credited"
by Enumerator With 233
WASHINGTON. D. C, Jan. 5.—"A
cuspidor census" has been officially
tiled in the house by Head Doorkeeper
Slnnott. The statistics were for the
house of representatives and showed
233 cuspidors. Sinnott "credits" seven
cuspidors to the naval committee, five
to the boy pages, four to former
Speaker Cannon, three to Speaker
Clark, one to Minority Leader Mann
and the rest scattering." w
THE San Francisco CALL
WOMEN WORKERS
RIOT FURIOUSLY
AT BIG MEETING
They Storm Doors of New
York Hippodrome About
Fifteen Thousand Strong
and Many Are Trampled
Underfoot in Wild Crush
to Hear Labor Leaders
POLICE POWERLESS
TO CONTROL CROWD
Clothes Are Torn to Tatters,
Hats Demolished, Heavy
Glass of Doors Shattered
—Mrs. Belmont Present
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK, Jan. s.—Fifteen thou
sand needle workers, chiefly women,
stormed the doors of the Hippodrome
this afternoon to get into a meeting
called by the Ladies' Waist Makers'
union preparatory to voting on a gen-
eral strike in connection with that of
the Garment Makers' union.
In the crush when the doors were
thrown open a score of women were
trampled underfoot.
Clothes w£re torn, hats demolished
and the heavy glass of the doors
smashed.
The police reserves were called from
the Fiftieth street station to reinforce
Inspector Callahan. Captain Gilligar.
and the 30 men already on the scene.
For a while the traffic was blocked In
Sixth avenue.
The meeting was called for 2 o'clock.
Eugene V. Debs and other labor leaders
were advertised to speak. By noon
Sixth avenue and the side streets were
jammed with a huge waiting throng.
WOMEN ARE KNOCKED DOWX
"When the doors were flung open at
last there was a wild rus-h to get in.
Men and women struggled with one
J another to force their way to the doors,
■if" , '":<? p>'icei;?e:: were swept off their
feet
The police dragged themselves oat
for a moment and then began to try
fruitlessly to Bfcove the crowd back.
They had no chance.
Woman after woman was knocked
down to be dragged from under the
feet of the crowd by the policemen.
In a few minutes more than 6,000,
chiefly women, had fought their way
into the Hippodrome and the manager
ordered the doors shut. This could
not be done until the reserves had
arrived and presented a solid front to
the mob.
Nearly 10,000 were turned away.
These were addressed by minor labor
leaders, who soon had a large group
of auditors about them, although the
police kept most of the crowd mov
ing.
MRS. BELMONT OCCUPIES HOI
For a while it was only with great
difficulty that lanes were kept open
to permit the passage of the streetcars.
The disorder at the Hippodrome
scarcely had been checked when Mrs.
O 11. P. Belmont arrived. She was
led to a box near the stage, which
she occupied during the meeting, list
ening to the speeches with apparent
interest.
Besides Eugene Debs, who was the
principal speaker, Frank Morrison, sec
retary of the American Federation of
Labor; Hugh Frayne, general organ
izer of the federation; Miss Josephine
Casey of Chicago; Abraham Cahan,
editor of a labor paper; Mayor London
and Jacob Pankon also addressed the
meeting.
FOURTH AIR HOSE VICTIM
"Joke ,, Perpetrated by Fellow Work-
man Result* in Fatality
(Specie! Dispatch to The Call)
EAST CHICAGO, Ind., Jan. s.—The
fourth victim of air hose "jokes" to
die in agony In the steel mill region
is Joseph Astin, 17 years old. A fel
low workman applied the pneumatic
hose, with a pressure of 100 pounds
to the inch", to Astin"s body. Astin'a
intestines and stomach were torn, and
the veins and arteries of his body dis
tended to four times their normal size.
STEEL HEIRESS IN SUIT
11. H. Gary's Daughter Asks Divorce
in Illinois Court
<Sp»Hal Dispatcb to The Call)
WIIEATON, 111.. Jan. s.—Mrs. If. \Y.
Sutcllffe, daughter of E. I[. Gary,
chairman of the United States Steel
corporation, has filed suit in Wheaton
for divorce. She charges desertion. No
alimony is asked. The Sutcliffes have
lived apart two years, according to her
attorney. Incompatability is the ground
for the action. ' : ',t I
ASTRONOMER SWIFT DIES
American Savant Who Discovered 15
Cometa Victim of Paralysis
BINGHAMPTON, N. T., Jan. s.—Dr.
Louis Swift, America's great astron
omer, died early today at his home in
Marathon, following a stroke of paral
ysis New Year day. Doctor Swift dis
covered more than 1.300 nebulae, or
"little worlds," and 15 comets.
SAN FRANCISCO. MONDAY, JANUARY 6, 1913.
Hatpin Pierces Caruso
Tenor Exclaims 'Ouch!'
Gcraldine Farrar listening to a talking machine s rendition of a song in her
own voice.
Encounters! Steel Point
While Siting With
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK, Jan. s.—Enrico Caruso
has been an admirer of Jeweled hat
pins, but after a brief encounter with
the sharp point of one worn by Ger
aldine Farrar the star tenor has ex
pressed a change of mind.
The accident, which rendered useless
for several minutes a perfectly good
thumb, occurred in the first act of
"Tosca."' which" was? having its season's
premiere at the Metropolitan opera
bouee.
Caruso had poured forth his golden
tones in his first aria, and Mario Cava
radassi advanced toward the Tosca of
the moment to demonstrate the extent
of the affection he had been proclaim
ing vocally.
Taking the lovely Tosca into his
arms, the tenor embraced her with real
istic ardor and flung his good right
arm about the lady's neck.
That finafl move proved disastrous.
Tt ended by lmpalins a stubby digit
upon an unyielding point of steel, and
persons sitting in the first row of
orchestra chairs say that Caruso ejacu
lated "Ouch!"
At all events, he shook his arm and
hand after the fashion of a schoolboy,
stuck thr> injured thumb in his mouth
and then applied his handkerchief to
the slight wound.
Misa Farrar laughed and the audi
ence laughed, but Caruso only frowned.
SACRIFICE FOR COLLEGE
By Menial Tank* 200 Glrle Raise Fund
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.. Jan. 5.—-
By going without chicken at their Sun
day dinners, by washing hair at 25
cents a head, cleaning rooms and other
menial tasks, the 200 girls of the four
dormitories of Colorado college have
raised $9,300 toward a $50,000 endow
ment fund needed to secure $100,000
offered for a gymnasium by Mrs. A. D.
Jullliard of New York city. E. P.
Shove, a retired business man here, has
offered to give $1 for each one they
raise.
VETERAN SCOUT IS DYING
Oliver P. Wlßßlne, Trapper With Kit
< arson, Near End
DENVER, Jan. s.—Oliver P. Wiggins,
trapper with Kit Carson, veteran of the
Mexican war and chief of scouts with
General Heath in the Indian wars, is
near death at his home here. Some
weeks ago Wiggins suffered a stroke
of paralysis from which he never ral
lied. No hope is held out for his re
covery. He is 90 years of age.
BEGS "SOLACE" OF CELL
Restless Stranger Say* He la Wanted
In South for Embezzlement
SPOKANE. Wash., Jan. s.—After
walking the streets most of the night,
"sleepless," he said, "seeking solace for
my soul," A. J. Stenzel asked a police
man here early today to take him into
custody, saying that he was wanted in
Galveston, Texas, for the embezzle
ment of $5,800 from the Citizens' Na
tional bank of Galveston. of which he
says he was assistant cashier.
for Dormitory
The apartment house, of an artistic
stucco exterior, contained 26 apart
ments, all but two of which were occu
pied at the time of the fire. But for the
fact that the fire was discovered before
Jit had reached the various exits, it is
believed a number of fatalities would
have resulted.
FIRE STARTS IH BASEMENT
According to an investigation by Fire
Chief James Kenney and testimony of
the house employes the flre is believed
to have started in a castiron flume in
the basement which contained the gas
pipes and electric wires, and which ex
tended to the top of the building. Sim
ultaneously at 8:40 o'clock fire broke
out in several places on different floors.
The alarm was quickly turned in and
the guests notified to leave at once.
The tenants on the first two floors
managed to save most of their valu
j ables, Aut the occupants of the third
J floor lost everything. It was in an
endeavor to save some highly valued
,keepsakes that Mrs. Ayr re-entered
I the building with her daughter and
"An Independent Newspaper ,, \
SOCIETY WOMEN
RESCUED AT FIRE
Two Narrowly Escape Death
When Flames Gut Apart
ment House
(Special Dispatch to The C«ll)
BERKELEY, Jan. 6.—Mrs. Washing
ton Ayr and her daughter. Miss Mabel
Ayr, well known society women of the
bay cities, narrowly escaped death to
night, when they were hemmed in by
flames on the top floor of the three
story Mansions apartment house at
2533 Charming way. The building was
gutted by the fire, which caused a loss
estimated at between $50,000 and $60,
--000. The house was insured for $40,000.
Placing ladders at perilous angles
from the roof of an adjoining resi
dence, members of the Berkeley flre
department climbed through the smoke
and flames to the window where the
two women, half suffocated, yvere pre
paring to jump 30 feet to the lawn
below, and brought them in safety to
the ground. Both Mrs. Ayr and her
daughter received slight burns and
were overcomfs by shock. The firemen
escaped injury.
ENTIRE BLOCK THREATENED
For three hours the fire department,
assisted by a company from Oakland,
fought desperately to prevent the fire
from sweeping the entire block of hand
some residences. Several times adjoin
ing dwellings caught fire, but the in
cipient blazes were extinguished before
gaining a foothold. At midnight the
flre was under control, though the ruins !
of the apartment house were still blaz- i
ing.
Continued on I'ajte 2t Column •
THREE VESSELS DASHED
TO DESTRUCTION NEAR
SAN DIEGD; MANY LOST
Seven Men, Including Two United States Immigration
Inspectors, Drown When Government Launch Eliza
beth, Fishing Power Boat Old Nick and Unidentified
Sloop Are Swept Ashore at Point of Rocks and Im
perial Beach by High Wind and Raging Seas
TWO, AFTER BATTLING BRAVELY WITH
SURF, SUCCEED IN GETTING TO SHORE
Sheriff, Notified That Five Mariners Were Frantically
Waving Signal of Distress From Wave Battered
Craft, Sends to Scene Deputies, Whose Futile All
Night Search Ends at Daylight When All That Can
Be Found Is Rudder and Part of Upper Works
SAN DIEGO, Jan. s.—The greatest marine disaster in the
vicinity of San Diego in many years occurred Saturday night at Point
of Rocks and Imperial beach, when three small vessels were swept
ashore by the high wind and raging sea and dashed to pieces.
The ill fated craft were the United States immigration inspectors'
cruiser launch Elizabeth, the fishing power boat Old Nick of San
! Diego and an unidentified sloop.
ALL TRACES OF WRECKAGE REMOVED
Seven men are known to have been drowned, while two, after
battling bravely with the surf, succeeded in getting ashore. The
total loss of life may never be learned owing to the fact that the number
of occupants of the third vessel, the sloop, is unknown, the seas removing
every trace of the wreckage with the exception of the rudder, and part of
the upper works. The known dead are:
Gus T. Jones, United States immigration inspector.
Daniel Kuykendall, United States immigration inspector.
G. Gorolami, engineer of the immigration launch Elizabeth.
Anton Basil, a local fisherman.
Clarence Hill, Pacific fleet boatman.
Tim Good, engineer,of the Old Nick.
Pete, a friend of Good.
The known saved are Frank Stout, partner of Hill, and Nick Demitleff,
owner of the Old Nick.
THIRD CRAFT'S CREW PERISH
The scene of the wreck is about 15 miles south down the Pacific coast.
The third vessel, the sloop, was
wrecked about a mile this side of the
other ill fated craft and is? supposed
to have had a crew of at least three
men. It is probable that these were
lost in addition to the seven known to
have perished.
The first word of the disaster came
last evening, when F. W. Taylor of
Imperial Beach telephoned to Sheriff
Jennings in San Diego that a vessel,
a sloop, was reported ashore several
miles south of Imperial and that five
men were frantically waving signals
of distress from the wave battered
craft. The sheriff at once sent three
men to the scene. But they could ac
complish nothing. The night was very
dark and tremendous seas were break
ing on the shore. The sheriff's men
could not discern the sloop, and it was
only when daylight came that the
wreckage was discovered.
FIND TRACES OF DISASTER
When the news of the wrecks spread
through this city this morning, Immi
gration Inspectors Wadham. Keep and
Conklin hastened down the const. Near
the mouth of the Tia Juana river they
found the binnacle box of the Eliza
beth and a blanket by one of the
miesing inspectors.
Charles Osburn, who has several
sloops engaged in fishing: in southern
waters, went to the scene of the dis
aster today to Identify, if possible, the
wreckage of the sloop. He expressed
the belief that it was a fishing boat,
but whether It had belong-d in Pan
Diego or San Pedro he could not say.
HUGE BREAKERS POl\D COAST
Point of Rocks is feared by fisher
men who ply along the southern coast.
In rough weather the seas are very
high there and the shore is dangerous
because of the rocks.
Ostourn says that when ho r I*l ted the
place today breakers IT> feet high were
pounding upon the coast.
Captain Dimitiff of the Old Nick,
after describing the gale and high
seas, thus related the story of the
wreck of his boat:
'•Good was in the engincroom trying
to start the power and all of us had
life preservers on. I heard Ktout cry:
'Hold on, boys' and then the boat
turned clear over and sank like a
stone.
THIRD TIME HE IS AVRECKJBD
"I did not see any of the party after
that until I saw Stout the next morn-
Ingr. I swam ashore and beat my way
Inland against the storm. I had no
shoes and my feet were torn by cactus
and I cut myself on three barb wire
fences before I came to the btoM of
a man named Menser. He toofe mo in
and gave me coffee and some clothes.
My boat was a total loss. This is the
third time I have been wrecked on
this coast.' .
Frank Stout, the Ottttf? survivor, a
powerful man v.ith only one ii ir> . s I
that he was washed ashore. 1 1
pressed surprise that the others did
"HEATHER FORECAST:
Fair: mo«'era<> northrsint nlnd.
I, $2,200--U;NCn COUNTER ami RESTAtItANT.
■ loin? $SO a day business; best payhisr place
TPIKEK BIG GENUINE BARGAINS
5650 — ON GOOD COKNKK, 19 rooms, arranijpii
SEE CLASSIFIED PAGES FOR CONTINUATION
OF THESE ADVERTISEMENTS
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
not come ashore in the same way. He
said he had to force the water from
his lungs five times while the waves
were hurling him upon the beach.
\O BODIES COME ASHORE
Xo bodies have come ashore. One
was seen in the surf this afternoon,
but subsequently It disappeared and
was presumably carried out to sea.
Most of the dead men were unmar
ried, but Inspector Kuykendall leaves
a widow in Los Angeles. Inspector
Jones leaves a mother and slater, who
livp in Sa.n Angelo, Tex.
The launch Elizabeth wm built In
San Pedro. It was 34 feet long and
had powerful engines.
The Old Nick was a sloop launch, 21
feet long and equipped with a 10 horse
power engine.
LOSS IN SOUTH TO
TOTAL MILLIONS
T.O.S AXGELES. Jan. 5.—-The wind
which began yesterday and before
night had reached the proportions of
a gal*\ causing damage through
a !argr*» portion of southern California,
diminished somewhat today, but the
weather became colder as It abated.
Ice formed to a thickness of half art
in many places this morning and
a. forecast that the mercury would fall
below freezing point again
morning caused citrus fruit prow *
considerable distress.
Damage amounting to millions of dol
lars will result to southern California.
The local weather forecaster say* the
temperature is lower than it has been
in 20 years. At all the orange produc
ing points the most depressing reports
are received.
At Riverside, which has laid claim to
being In the frostless belt, the ther
mometer registers 18 degrees. Nothing
short of a miracle can save the crop.
li\ San Gabriel, another highly fa-
I ROYAL I
NESTOR
Original London & Cairo
Cigarettes
Ejfcy,WoM.rr Co.
iGI-ieT CALIFORNIA ST.

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