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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 07, 1913, Image 1

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Kalr. hra\y frost In morrihUE. heeoinlHc wurtnei . On
cloudy (hirinK day; iv!u« rlianu'lus «'» m»uthen*t.
SAN FRANCISCO HAS
Witnessed $43,409,468 of real
estate sales in the year ended
October 31, 1912.
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 38.
BOURBONS FORCE
SUTHERLAND OUT
AND YOUNG WINS
Assembly Democrats Com- 1
pel Partisan Caucuses atj
Eleventh Hour and Pro-:
, gressives and Republicans
Compromise Speakership
by Electing Berkeleyan
BOYNTON, OROVILLE,
SENIOR OF SENATE
Both Houses of Legislature
Organize and in Upper
Branch Curtin of Sonora
Is Proclaimed the Next
Candidate of the Minority
Party for Governor's Job
By GEORGE A. VAX SMTTH
CALL BiraEATJ,
BACEAVTNTO HOTEL.
Sacramento, January 6.
By forcing; partiean caucuses the
leaders of organized democracy today
undid all the plans of the progressive
and republican strategists.
They eliminated the two genuine con
tenders from the speakershlp fight and
elected C. C. Young, progressive of
Berkeley, speaker of the assembly.
They aligned their, forces in the
senate for a session—lons: running
flftrht
That fight Is due to break tomorrow
:nomlng.
Not since the last legislature ron
trolled by a democratic majority hare
the bourbons exercised an organiza
tion Influence so potent.
PARTY LITVE IMUPIJUIUXT DRAW*
The success of the caucus plans laid
by Senator Caminettl and J. O. Davis,
chairman of the democratic state cen
tral committee, determined the charac
ter of the controlling caucuses In both ;
houses.
It drew a definite line between the
democrats ant] the progressive repub
ican majority.
It put the republicans and pro
gressives together.
Tt enabled Senator "L. W. Juiliard of
Sonoma to announce Senator J. B. Cur- .
tin of Sonora as a democratic candi
date for governor in 1914.
The announcement of the democratic :
agreement to caucus, made shortly
after 12 o'clock this morning, put W. ;
A. Sutherland, progressive of Fresno,
out of the speakership fight. With the ;
r-ijrht democrats pledged to him he
could have won in a nonpartisan cau- J
:us. Without the democrats, Benedict i
was high man in a caucus composed of j
1.4 progressives and republicians.
I NCI R HARMONY IS POPULAR
Old Uncle Harmony was a popular j
person this morning. Sutherland pro- j
posed that both he and Benedict with- j
draw in favor of Young, low man in
the progressive quartet of candidates.
The proposition was made in the
'.ame of harmony and the cause.
Benedict listened.
Sutherland led him to the governor.
The governor agreed that the plan
was splendid. He also agreed to the i
selection of Young as the compromise
candidate.
Before the democrats had organized
their caucus Young was the lone ma
orlty candidate for speaker and the re- j
publicans and progressives were done
with all talk about nonpartisan co
operation.
However, subsequently, in their cau
cus, they decided to give the demo
crats an even break in the patronage
allowance.
%'O DICKERING WITH BOURBOXS
The republicans and progressives In
<he senate attempted no dickering with
he democrats.
They avoided showing their caucus I
agreement to any democrat and agreed
to give the majority of 10 senators
an aggregate of $20 a day, while they
apportioned $13 a day, each, to every
republican and progressive.
Wherefore, the eenate democrats are
roth; moreover, they are prepared to [
air their grievance. They purpose to I
take the public into their caucus not :
later than tomorrow.
The democrats contend that the $400
h. day allowed for attaches is the pub
lic's money. Also, that they represent
the public and are entitled to a better
break than that contemplated by a di
of the spoils which gives them
52 a day, each, and the majority of
the senators $13 a day each.
itor Camtnettl purposes to make
B f*W remark:-! on the I
tow.
sKWTOR (AMIXKTTI WIM, KXIDR
D of Sacramento, the only
senator elect to be welcomed with a
Moral offering, lias expressed himself
feelingly if privately. Cohn wants to
hire some one tor $2 a day who will
be competent to explain to his con
stituents why they can not be put on
nate pay roll.
The San Francisco progressives in
both houses objected to giving the dem
ocrats the disposition of any patronage
allowances.
The majority caucus in the senate
will ask the assembly caucus tn sprop
immediately upon the dates for t ;
Continued on Pace 2, Column 4
THE San Francisco CALL
"The? Pcop/t ,1 riQ-'spaoer" |
1,000 SUBSCRIBE
$10 FOR EDITORS
Long Islanders and Roosevelt
Give One Cent Each and Send
Message to Prisoners
BOISE, Idaho, Jan. 6.—State Senator
! Dow Dunning, author of the plan to
J collect penny contribution* to pay the
j fines of It. S. Sheridan, C. O. Broxon
j and A. R. Cruzen, now confined In the
i Ada county Jail for contempt of the
Idaho supreme court for criticising the
j court's decision barring the progressive
' candidates for presidential eloctom from
j the ballot, received $10 from Colonel
I Theodore Roosevelt today, representing
butiona from 1.000 residents of
j oyster Bay and other Lonar Uland
! towns.
' The contribution was accompanied by
j a message praising tho three men for
! the stand they took. "They have made
; all honest American cltliene their
! debtors and they now aro the foremoet
, champions und exponents of the rlgrhU
i»f the people to rule themselves."
. Roosevelt said In hie mabaeare.
— •
HIRED MAN SOME FIGHTER
j San Jo«e Ranch Hand Trounces His
Knn»:oyer, Prominent Attorney
(Special Dispatch to TU* Call)
SAN JOSE. Jan. B.—A disagreement
over the price of some tools with which
I Kugene Byera was clearing brush on
t the Robertson ranch above Los Gatos
I led to a rough and tumblo mlxup In
i the First National Bank building this
j afternoon In which Richard F. Robert
i son, candidate for state senator at the
recent election and a prominent local
attorney, received a drubbing at the
hands of Byers, one of hia ranch hands.
. The attorney was later haled into po
lice court on a battery charge and re
taliated by charging Byers with dls
turbing the peace.
#__-
HIDES FRIENDS AT DEATH
\ Redding; County Honpltal Patient Be
lieved to Have Had Rich
Associates
(Specift! Dispatch to The Call)
REDDING, Jan. C—rJoseph H. Bowie.
! supposed to have wealthy friends In
Gilroy, died In the county hospital here
today. Delirious with fever he left
I a hospital in Dunsmuir last#Monday
clad In hie night clothes and was found
at Sims, 12 miles south, the next day.
Bowie regained his senses only long
enough to say that he had friends In
Gilroy. but that he did not want them
to know of his plight
• _—.
SNQWCLAD EAST! IT'S 91!'
Aud >losqultoeß Are on the Job on the <
Shores of Jersey
(Special L>l»patch to The Call)
NEW YUKK, Jan. 6.—A perfectly!
sobtr and upright thermometer of the
Georgo Washington variety on one of
Asbury park's sunny business streets
at 11:30 o'clock this morning registered
91 degrees. It was the warmest Janu
ary 6 on record. The mosquitoes are j
almost a plague in South River, Mill
town, Sayreville and Highland Park In
Jersey. The insects are big, brawny
and voracious.
OLD LANDMARK DAMAGED
-\apa Hotel Has Clone Call as Result
of Defective Fine
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
N'APA, Jan. 6.—The Napa hotel, one !
of the landmarks of this city and one ;
of the best known hostelries of north- j
em California, was badly damaged by
fire tonight, which started from a de
fective flue in one of the rooms. The \
fire department succeeded In confining i
the blfize to the third floor of the
building - .

ROCKEFELLER IN BAHAMA!
Millionaire Sougrht as Money Trust
'Witness in Usual Health
NASSAU, Bahama Islands, Jan. C.—
William Rockefeller, whose presence i
as a witness before the house money
trust investigating committee at Wash
ington has been sought by Chairman
Pujo, arrived at Nassau last Friday.
Rockefeller apparently la In good
health.

THIEVES LOOT CHURCH
Dean Sumner Wltneeeee the Robbery;
Botb Men Captured
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
CHICAGO, Jan. 6.—Two thieves j
looted the cathedral of Saints Peter I
and Paul of vessels, goblets, candle
sticks and a silver chalice early today
while Dean Walter T. Sumner and Sis
ter Jeannette looked on in horror. The
tbJevea were traced to a nearby lodg- I
ing house and arrested.
COW STORK BRINGS FOUR
: San .lose llolntein and 'I'rni of Family
Are Dolne Well
(Special IH«patcU to The Call)
BAN JQSE, Jan. 6.—A 4 year old
Holstfin cow owned by Bert Knowles,
proprietor of the Coyote hotel, today
gave birth to four calves. Two of them
died tonight. The cow and the re
maining two members of her family are
doing well.
NOTED FRANCISCAN DEAD
Mont Frequently Photographed Monk
Dies In Santa Barbara Monastery
SANTA BARBARA, Jan. 6.—Brother
Hugolinup, a Franciscan monk who for
more than a quarter of a century had
lived at the Santa Barbara mission and
who was one of. the most frequently
photographed persons in the world,
died here today.
BAN FRANCISCO. TUESDAY. JANUARY 7, 19113.—PAGES 1 TO 10.
LUCKENBACH LINE
TO ENTER PACIFIC
WITH FREIGHTERS
Failure of Bates & Chese
brough Brings Big Mari
time Company Into
Panama Trade
DETAILS OF PROJECT
HAVE BEEN SETTLED
Service Between San Fran
cisco and New York Will
Be Independent
The Luckanbach Steamship company
of New York announced yesterday that
within two weeks It would inaugurate
a freight service carrying east and
■■vent bound freight between San Fran
eieco tm6 New York.
The announcement came from J.
Lewis Luckenbach, who has been liv
ing: at the St. Francis for the last three
months, and in effect pledges the main
tenance of an independent steamship
line between here and New York, via
the Panama railway. The failure of
Bates & Chesebrough, operators of
the California-Atlantic Steamship com
pany, who had under charter two of
the eastern firm's ships, hastened the
determination of the Luckenbuch in
terests to enter the Pacific coast ser
vice.
Arthur Chesebrough stated last even
ing that his company had no definite
pians for reorganization and that if
the Luckenbach company was coming
into Pacific waters as an independent
company, no immediate effort would
be made by his company further to
s«-pk charters.
RAILWAY PLANS rEKFKCTKD
Arrangements with the Panama.rail
road were perfected yesterday to han
dle freight between Balboa and New
York. It was stated exclusively in
The Call <Mi Saturday morning that
theae negotiations were pending and
that on their conclusion the big Now
York steamship company would an
nounce its determination to take up
tho malntfiiancc of the Independent
Hae-#epers*te<f by Bates & Chesebrough
since October, 1910.
The Luckenbachs own a large fleet of
American steamers. Among them are
the Lewis Luckenbach. 7,000 . tons;
Pleiades, 6,000 tons; Lyra, 6.700 tons;
D. N. Luckenbach, 7,000 tons; Jacob
Luckenbach, 5.000 tons; F. J. Lucken
bach, C.OOO tons; Harry Luckenbach,
5,000 tons; R V. Luckenbach, 5.200 tons;
San Mateo. 5,200 tons; Uamara, 9,500
tons, and J. L. Luckenbach, 7,000 tons.
The Pleiades and the Lewis Lucken
bach have been under charter by Bates
& Chesebrough and will be pressed into
service by the new operating company.
The Damara also has , been under
charter and will be added to the fleet
about the middle of February. Other
steamers will be added to the service
In the Pacific as they are required.
VVIMi OPKX OUX OFFICE
Besides its steamships the Luken
bach company operates on the Atlan
tic 22 coal barges of 3,100 tons ench
and four ocean going tow boats. Wil
liams, Dimond & Co. have been tb« rep
resentatives of the company in this
city for some time and will continue
as such until the Lukenbach company
has opened its own offices in this city.
"The failure of Bates & •Chese
brough," J. L<»wis Luckenbach said,
yesterday, at the St. Francis, "merely
hastens the coming of our company to
the Pacific.
"We are here, now, to stay and are
making plans to increase our shipping
facilities. Two large ships of 10,000
tons each are to be constructed and
they will be placed on the Pacific
coast run. Next to the American-
Hawaiian Steamship company, we have
the finest freighters operating in the
Panama trade.
HKAD TO SETTLE HERE!
"I expect to remain here in charge
of the business and will open offices
on the water front close to the trade.
Personally, although both Bates and
Chesebrough are my closest friends, I
am glad that I am to live permanently
in the exposition city."
Arthur Chesebrough. president of tho
California-Atlantic Steamship company,
on hearing that the Luckenbachs had
decided to open a steamship line of
their own said:
We have no definite plans for re
organization or for continuing the
line we have maintained since Oc
tober. 1910. If the Luckenbachs
are going to enter the field we will
very likely twminate our a> tlvi
tie.?.
Joseph Tynan, PiipTin Undent of the
Union Iron works, was happy when
he heard of the new line coming into
the Pacific trade. He said that , his
company would use every influence to
have the two new ships contemplated
by the Luckenbachs built in local
yards.
STEAM KILLS 8 STOKERS
Collector Pipe Explodes in Hold of
French AVsmhlp
TOUXiON, France, Jan. 6.—Eight fire
men were killed today by an explosion
in the stoke hold of the French battle
ship Massena. The Massena was pass
ing the ITyeree islands when the steam
collector pipe of a boiler burst. . I
LAWYER PATRICK
GAINED LIBERTY
THROUGH LETTER
Appeal to Prison Superin
tendent With Family
Matters Therein Got
Result
WIFE'S CONDUCE IS
RECITED AT LENGTH
Protests Innocence of Mur-
der of Aged Millionaire
Many Years Ago
! (SpoHal Dl.onateh to The Call)
ALBANY, N. V.. Jan. 6.—Albert T.
Patrick* liberty la probably due to a
remarkable letter which he wrote to
Colonel Joseph R. Hcott, superintend
ent of prieons. This letter, with all
the other papers In connection with
Patrick's appeals for clemency, was
I erlven out for publication today by
Governor Sulze.r. The letter was an
; appeal to the emotions, pure and sim
ple. It la known that Colonel Scott
wag one of the principal men to plead
Patrick's causa In the weeks just pre
vious to Thanksgiving day.
The letter to Colonel Scott from
the prisoner deals largely with the de
| votlon and self -sacrifice of his wife
■ during- his lon£ imprisonment. It re
i fers repeatedly to the conspiring of
j enemies without indicating who these
■ enemies are un<l calls attention to the
misfortunes of his family, particularly
to his daughter, of whom he said:
"To marry in haste and repent at leis
ure," was her fate.
"I em writing , you of delicate cir
cumstances, which necessitate speedy
i action by the governor In my case,"
wrote , Patrick to Colonel Scott, "and
:in which 1 am sure I will have his
.sympathy if you see fit to speak to
him about thorn in the confidential
manner they require. During all the
12 years which I have been in urieon
my wife has fought valiantly for me.
She visited me in the Tombs—dally
and as often ajf, the rules permlttfd
during \he almcUtt five years that I
languished there and*the penal part of
he prison for .' . . . ty !»lx years last
past. History shows no record of eac
rlflce, loyalty and devotion such as
Hers, She "has been constantly en-
R&ffed with my affairs, and her health
is shattered by her sacrifices and the
continual alternation of hope and de
spair.
MAW HOPES BLASTED
"Time and again tilings have come
to light which in the ordinary course
of events would have set any man at
liberty against whom there was not a
continuing conspiracy. But as hope
has been dashed to earth time and
again, she has survived the shock."
Patrick related the numerous persons
having power, evidence of Influence to
sell when we have no money or dis
position to buy and of how his friends
fell away from him after his arrest,
until his brother in law, John L. Mil
llkln, came out of the west and took
charge of his affairs.
"The situation is rendered all the
more exigent," said the writer, "by the
circumstances of my daughter, w?io
married Paul Martin. She had seen
little of the world, and when, upon her
return from boarding school, after
three years' absence, she met him at a
watering place near by and away from
their families, she yielded to his pro
posals and entreaties to an immediate
marriage. To marry in haste and re
pent at leisure was her fate."
Th" death of his father, the danger
ous illness of an aged aunt and the
hope that his aged mother's prolonged
and grieved sorrow might soon be
brought to an end and that he might
comfort her in her declining years,
were all recorded by Patrick. He said
his mother had surrendered all her
property In his defense and that her
semiweekly letters always wind up
with the prayer "that I may soon ob
tain justice and le permitted to clear
my name and do my part In the -world."
SAYS HE WAS RAILROADED
Patrick declare*! that the proof was
ample that he was railroaded and that
no evidence of its guilt had been
shown. He declared that he wished
to be free to establish his innocence
in court and to afford the state an
opportunity to tty him for the murder
of Rice. He mado the peculiar request
that if the governor should act in
his case his action be not such as to
require acceptance by him.
The papers In the case include sev
eral letters written by Millikln
to the late E. W. Hoffleat, Governor
Hughes* former legal adviser. In one
of these he says: "Judge Otto Ro
salsky told Morris Myers three weeks
before the opinion of the court of ap
peals was handed down, that It would
be adverse to Patrick and that Judge
Gray would read the dissenting opin
ion. He told Myers he got this in
formation from the district attorney's
office and that time Judge Gray's son
was assistant district attorney. I don't
accuse Judge Gray of being bought or
being corrupted, but I do believe he
was influenced by some cause other
than the records , of the case as In
the prevailing opinion he distorted the
testimony and facts. If you believe
this ask Senator Hill If he can point
out to you where it waa done."
"An independent Ae;n^y£f**
Two Arts Upset Cupid
Fritzi Scheff Sues
Fritzie Scheff, comic opera star, who is suing her writer husband for divora
Mixture of Temperaments of Actress and
Writer Aired in Divorce Action
(Sperlnl Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK, Jan. 6.—Two arts and
two temperaments made just four
sources of dissension in the romance of
John Fox Jr. and Fritzi Scheff, and
after four yeara of more or less happi
ness the couple have asked the courts
to cut loose the bonds that were so
heavily upon the two.
The report that the writer and his
wife had separated were first heard last
fall. It met with immediate denial, but
It seems the denial was Inspired by a
TALKING "MOVIE"
TO DOOM STAGE,
EDISON ASSERTS
Wizard Confident Invention,
Which Will Be on Market
in Month, Will End "Le
gitimate ,, Careers
(Speolel Dispatch to The Call)
NETW YORK, Jan. 6.—Thomas A. Edl
eon eaid today that he believed the end
of the present legitimate stage at hand
as a result of his newest Invention, a
talking motion picture machine, called
the kinetophone, which proved success
ful In a demonstration held a few days
ago.
The inventor explained why he thinks
the present $2 show must go and give
away to the cheaper form of amuse
ment, which he declared will give al
most as much as the other for a dime.
There will be no more barnstormers
either, because no one will be willing
to pay for second class acting: when the
former stars are performing for the
j "talkies" and can be seen and heard
: for 10 cents.
"Is this machine perfected?" Edison
was asked.
"Not perfect," replied Edison; "but
it works. It will be put in operation
in Brooklyn inside of 30 days.
EDISON DESCRIBES MACHINE
"What does your new Invention do?"
"It delivers at the exact Instant of
occurrence on the film any sound made
at the moment such action took place.
Every word uttered by the actors is
recorded and delivered in time with the
action; the creaking , of a gate, a
whistle, the noise of hoofbeats, even
the click of cocking a revolver, comes 1
apparently from the scene and In unl
i eon with the motion."
"How is it done?"
"The phonograph, which is played
behind the scene, Iβ wired to the pic-
Continued on Pace 2, Column I
Tflehex* Temperature Yeeterdej. 46; Lowest *n»da*
i-.-j,Aiirhf. 34. For detail* of the AVeather nee r«;p 1%.
/r' */ Ftop oale — Your choice of a portion of my entire
/J / k - which consists of several good drirerw.
TO TICK FROM 80 HEAD
*T* £~ ' y ()F|)IR STOCK, WHICH ARK WORKIXft
SEJjfcLjBSIFIED PAGES FOR CONTINUATION
« THESE ADVERTISEMENTS
desire to have the divorce proceedings
conducted without publicity, for not !
long after gossip became busy with
their affairs the formal action was I
brought by Mrs. Fox.
It was sent to a referee by the su- •
preme court justice before whom the
application was made, but no record,
was made of the order. This Is not un- !
usual, as the necessity for entering it is j
not presented until the report is made '
back to the Justice. The referee is hear- •
lug evidence now.
TIP FROM WOMAN
LANDS 4 IN CELL
AS AUTO BANDITS
Chicago Police Sure They
Have Quartet Forming
Day and Night Rob
ber Terrors
CHICAGO, Jan. 6.—A woman, whose
identity the police refuse to reveal,
gave Information which has led to the
arrest today of the last of four m*n
accused of being the auto bandits who
have terrorized Chicago for weeks by
their bold day and night robberies.
The men held are Herbert Cattlith,
Charles MeXeff, Albert Calrest and
James Mitchell. All of the prisoners
have several aliases. Viola Allen, a
girl companion of Cattlith, also was
detained.
CONFESSES OTHER ROBBERIES
Cattlith, who is believed to be the
leader of the sang, already has con
fessed to participating In three rob
beries and 15 burglaries, but both he
and his companions denied that they
were the automobile bandits. Hβ says
he is a Bon of the county assessor at
Marksville, la., and that he came here
recently from St. I>ouis.
VICTIMS IDENTIFY LEADER
Three victims of recent holdups have
identified Cattlith and some of the
other prisoners as the men who robbed
them.
All of the men except Cat tilth were
arrested last night. Cattlith escaped ■
under fire and was not found until sev- I
eral hours later. Captain Halpln put
a guard over Cattlith, fearing he would
attempt suicide.
The latest and one c,t the most dar
ing crimes of the motor rar bandits
was the daylight robbery of a jewelry \
store last Friday. In a revolver battle J
that followed with the police Patrol
man Stlcken was shot.
PRICE FWE CENTS.
COAST STATES
IN ICY GRIP
OF BLAST FROM
THE FAR NORTH
Mercury Registers 32 8-10
Degrees, Lowest Recorded
for Last 40 Years, With
Single Exception of Janu
ary 15, 1888, When 20 De
grees Was Recorded—
Frost Causes Damage to
Citrus Crop That Is Ex
pected to Run to Millions
LITTLE LIKELIHOOD
OF CHANGE TODAY
i Many Ranchers Take Ad
vantage of Warning Sig
nals and Give Protection
to Bearing Trees —Smudge
Pots Smolder or Blaze
All Night Within Radius
of 125 Miles of Los An
geles, Providing a Smoke
Blanket for the Orchards
Coldest Day in 25 Years
Six Below Zero at Summit
4 «■
Yesterday wa« th* coldest day
In 25 year*, and. excepting; Janu
ary 15, 18S3, when the thermome
ter recorded 20 decrees, there haa
never been anch severe weather
In thin cltv for 40 year*, which is
i» far v the gOTernment records
date.
The future* of the Icy blast a*
sriven tn a report by l'rof. Alex
ander McAdie of the Untten
states weather bureau, fellowi
Lowest temperature yesterday,
32.S dPsrrcei* Fahrenheit.
January 15, ISSH, 20 degrees
(limrM ever recorded).
Lowest temperature Sunday, 30
decrees.
Coldest f'nr last year, January
15, 40 defgrrrM.
Other polutM In the state:
Los Aiiceles, 34 deicrrcN , ,
Kurrka, 2S ileßTees; Snn Dleso, 2S
desrree*; Freino, 20 doßrcess Red
Bluff, 30 decrees; Summit, 6 <!<■
iprees below zero.
San Francisco and the entire stato
of California shivered In Its boots y>
te»rday. In fact It has been shivering
thus for the last several days. But
yesterday the thermometer dropped
3 2-10 degrees lower than it registere<!
the day preceding. Today there will
be little or no change in the tempera
ture, according to Prof. A. G. McAdie.
official weather forecaster, and It will
still be a case of heavy overcoats, hot
toddies, sleam heat and hot waterbag?.
King Frost is still supreme, ana
since his descent upon the land of
sunshine, fruit and flowers last Satur
iday he has conducted his reign with a
ruthless hand, causing damage which
1 will run Into millions of dollars for the
growers of citrus fruit.
TWENTY DEGREES IN 1888
Never in the history of the state for
j the last 40 years, with one exception.
j has there been such a cold wave. Tee
terday the thermometer at the M«r ■
chants* Exchange for the United States
. weather bureau registered 32 8-10 de
'' grees. In the 40 years that the local
\ weather bureau has been In exlstenc••
! the single day that was colder was
j January 15, 1888, when it was 20 de
'■ grees. The thermometer Indicated the
i temperature of the air merely, and
[ Professor McAdle says It was consld
! erably colder yesterday on the surfac*;
i of the ground.
I DEW FORMS ICICI.ES
The dew on the trees in Golden Gate
park and other parks about the i II
formed into small icicles, presenting a
pretty effect.
San Francisco, however, was not th* -
Are You Sati?fied
with your oM/C^V
style, nncom-I A
fortable slasseslf^V^
that pinch and V v\ »r Jj^gg*
fall off your \^ii^^
nose —of course
not. Then why J
don't you wear the ff^'^v^
new eye glass—the f IsDr.
Equipoise. They are I | rf^
perfectly comfort- \\ ugu
able, look stylish on
the face and won't
come off until you
want them to. Wear Equipoise.
CALIFORNIA OPTICAL CO.
(W.P.Fenntmore J.W.Davis A.R.Fennimorej
181 Poet St San Franc Urn
1221 Broadnar Oakland
(C. L. Uogue at Oakland Store, i

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