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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 09, 1913, Image 1

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THE CALL ISSUES A FOURTH EDITION AT 6 A. M. DAILY CONTAINING ALL THE LATE WORLD AND CITY NEWS
Hl«he«t Tempemtiire mtrrday. 50: I.nwfiit
MscJ't. 40. For detail* of the \\>«lh»r wee Pag» S.
(
San Francisco Has
SPENT $25,922,066 IN BUILDINCI'"
OPERATIONS IN THE YEAR
ENDED OCTOBER 31,1912

VOLUME OXIIL—NO. 40.
PRISON RECORDS
OF OLDEN TIMES
RECALL KILLING
Antiquated Dispatch Bo <
Contains Documents Justi
fying Acts of James King
of William, Shot Fifty-
Seven Years Ago by James
P. Casey, Lynched for the
Crime by the Vigilantes
PAPERS MISLAID
WITH MANY OTHERS
Children of Pioneer May De
mand Return of Personal
Books, Sold Together
With Manuscripts—Story
of Thrilling Incident of
Olden Days Recounted
From History of Events
After reposing for more than 'half a
century In the bottom of an antiquated
tin dispatch box where they had been
carelessly dumped with a lot of old
deeds and mortgages, papers have been
found which at one time precipitated
one of the gravest situations in the
history of San Francisco.
The papers referred to contain the
prison record of James P. Casey, who
Phot and killed James King of Wil-
Ham May 14, 1856, after the latter had
published the farts of his early life
in the columns of his paper. Fortu
nately they have been preserved in
their entirety, and among them is a
copy of the pardon issued by Hora
i!o Seymour, then governor of the
state of New York, to Casey after he
had served IS months of his two year
sentence.
qiESTTOY SETTLED
The old documents settle positively
for the first time the long mooted
question of whether the charges made
by King against Casev wer« actually
'.rue or whether King acteu Vith/vit
warrant in publishing the assertion
that Casey had served time in Sing
Sing. They show that King had the
proof to hack his charges had he lived
to produce it.
James King of William was the foun
der "and publisher of the Evening Bul
letin and bitterly opposed to th& po
litical advancement, of Casey, whom he
privately believed to be a crock. On
the first hint of Casey's supposed in
carceration King sent to Sing Sir^g , fer
the farts of the case, and upon r
ing them printed an expose of t'nc N< -v
Yorker in his journal.
From then on events marshaled them
selves with dramatic swiftness. < asey
galled at the H 'l'etin office the same
afternoon and demanded a retraction,
which was not forthcoming. Late-,
about •"• o'clock, he waylaid King in
Montgomery street and shot him. He
was immediately hustled over to the
police station, but fearing for hie safe
ty, because the shooting had aroused
the citizens to a frenzy, the sheriff re
moved him to the county jail.
I/I RCHUffi OF CASEV
It was from here four days later
asey was taken by the vigilance
•< ommittee, that dreaded instrument'
of early pioneer justice, which had re
organized to meet the imperative de
mand of the outraged people. Twenty
six hundred strong the vigilance com
mittee marched from its headquarters
in Sacramento street to the old county
JaM in Broadway. It was probably one
of the most dramatic scenes in the
history of all California.
"As the troops - with glistening bayo
nets marched up Sacramento street,
the immense body of spectators who
"" re attracted to the spot by the
ovements of the committee, ,, says a
writer in the old Alta California of
that date, "pressed along , through the
< rowded street with the armed force,
and the whole living throng moved
fotward with scarcely an audible voice
save that Of the officers in command.
A eolemnity and stillness pervaded the
v. hole party that was at once signi
ficant of the might and power in those
brave hearts and willing hands.
Through all the streets where they
passed, the doors and windows of the
buildings were filled with • persons
whose curiosity was excited by the
novel scene. As the mass , moved on
Its numbers were augmented and per
sons were seen hurrying from all
directions to the Jail."
HANGING WAS SUMMARY
Pending the outcome of Kings
wound. Casey was held a prisoner in
the committee's rooms. Upon the death
of the stricken editor he was brought
to trial and summarily hanged. Two
hours after the lynching the committee,
Which had been recruited from among
the foremost and wealthiest men of
tiie city, stacked arms, and its mem
bers passed out. of the clubrooms to
mingle once more with the world at
large.
Upon the death of King the greater
part of his library went to his son,
('aarles James King, and yith the
many rare old books went the little,
old tin box in which, unknown to every
one, rests the historic documents.
Continued on Page 3, Column 2
"The People's Newspaper ,, I
OSCULATED FOR
HALF AN HOUR
1
Thrifty Quartermaster Piled Up
Pelf Charging Tolls on Can
didates for Girls Kisses
There was „ real kissing bee yester
day at the head of the gangplank of
the iner Moana. It lasted from 13
oclock until 11:30, when the ship
pulled out for Australia. Ancng the
passengers on the liner were the Misses
Anne anil K&therine young:,
pretty and on their vt y to J*aii »C«~ ■
ton, Tasmania. A yojr.er man who «•«:•?
very sorry that they were awa\
sang the;n a farewell serenade. The
crowd on the wharf applauded. Miss
Katherine smiled her appreciation.
"That's worth a kiss," said Miss Anne.
The singer rushed up the gangplank
and Anne rendered payment.
"Kiss me, too?" inquired another
young man.
Anne nodded. When he tried to col
lect the quartermaster barred his way.
"My horders," said the quartermas
ter, "is to allow nobody up the gang
way."
"Suppose I put a shillin' in your
eye?" asked the man who wanted to
reach Anne.
"I could pee with the hother one,
sir."
Handing the quartermaster half a
dollar, he made his way to Anne.
There was a rush after this for the
gangway. Everybody had half a dol
lar. Anne kissed everybody that
reached her. "When the ship sailed the
quartermaster had $6.50.
MARRIED SIXTY YEARS
, Former Senator Cole, 91, and AVlfe, 79.
c Celebrate Anniversary
(By Federal Wireless)
LOS ANGELES', Jan. B.—Former Unit
ed States Senator Cornelius Cole and
Mrs. Cole began today, in their home,
8121 avenue, their sixty-first
year of married life. They celebrated
their sixtieth wedding anniversary yes
terday surrounded by their children,
grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Mr. Cole is 91 and Mrs. Cole is 79. De
spite his advanced age, Cole continues a
law practice that he began In 1848 in
Oswego. N. T. He came to California
with the gold rush in 1849.
FOND WIFE MAKES PLEA
Woman Offer* to Sell Raven Hair to
Replace Stolen Money
(Spec**! ni«p«tch to Tlie Call)
BOSTON, Jan. B.—Mrs. Irvin Dodd,
pleading with the pardon icommittee
of the governor's counsels for the re
leaaj of her husband, who* is-serving
a two year term for larceny, offered
today to-aeJl her raven .sblack hair,
which reaches to the- ground, If she
could thereby secure money to pay
back to an express company the $500
which her husband was convicted of
stealing.
—• •
CYCLIST SERIOUSLY HURT
ff»BIII lliM'lor's Ante l.tndn Egbert
Post in stan .tone Hospital
(Special IMspetch to -Gc Call i
SAN JOSE, Jan. B.—Egh-rt Post, a
cyclist, lies seriously injured at the Co
lumbia hospital as the re*"'t of
a collision between his machine ? i \\,
automobile driven by Dr. Hannah Good -
ridge in North Third street last night.
After the accident the woman stopped
her machine and assisted in carrying
the unconscious man to a-cab. She then
accompanied him to the hospital.

SMALL BOY LEAVES HOME
William lluMon'n Dog Bark. Starred and
(iannt; Searcher* Out
(Special Dispatch to The C«l!)
NAPA, Jan. 8.-»Search is being made
for William Huston, the 13 year old son
of Mr. and Mrs. George Huston, who
has mysteriously disappeared. The boy
became angry at a reproof administered
by his father on Monday and secretly
struck off into the hills with his pet
dog. The dog came back to the house
on Tuesday in a starved and gaunt con
dition.
HE HAD NOT FORGOTTEN
Man Who Shook W r ilson'e Hand Hoped
President Elect Remembered It
PRINCETON, N. J., Jan. B,—Presi
dent elect Wilson's mail continues as
heavy as ever and an amusing letter
received today was from a man in Now
Jersey who had shaken his hand in
the campaign.
"I don't want to be presumptuous,"
he wrote, "but I trust you* have not
forgotten the incident."
WALTER M. YOUNG KILLED
Well Known Mining: Man Victim of
Banting Pulley Wheel
ANACONDA, Jan. B.—Walter 1C
Young, aged 50, head of the Peck plant
at the emelters, was killed today, when
a bursting pulley wheel struck him.
Young was associated with the O. B.
Peck company for 25 years in differ
ent parts of South Africa. South Amer
ica and portions of western America
and California.
EDITOR FIGHTS COLONEL
Deathlens Duel Near Havana for Satis
faction of Honor
HAVANA, Jan. B.—Colonel Orestei
Ferrara, speaker of'tlie house of repre
sentative.*, and Miguel Coyula of the
editorial staff of Lα Lucha, fought a
duel with swords today. Neither was
injured seriously. The duel was the
outcome of certain strictures on Colo
nel Ferrara published by Lβ. Lucha.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 8. **
TWO SURVIVORS
AND LIFE SAVERS
GALE'S PRISONERS
Until Storm Abates No At
tempt Will Be Made to
Remove From Lightship
Men Rescued From Lost
Rosecrans and Members of
the Point Adams Crew
PLANK RIDER TELLS
THRILLING STORY
Fred Peters, Carried On
Board for Miles Along the
Coast by Surging Billows,
Recites Experience; Wreck
Caused by Mistake Re
garding North Head Light
ASTORIA, One., Jan. B.—Until the
gale, which continued to rage all day
without any apparent sign of cessation,
moderatf-s no attempt will be made to
romovg from the Columbia river light
sl'lp the Point Adams life saving crew
and two survivors of the tank steamer
Koscrrans, which went ashore on Pea
cock spit yesterday.
After waiting until late to.day in hope
that the storm would abate sufficiently
to enable the transfer of the marooned
seamen the tug Oneonta, which had
been standing by since midnight Mon
day, returned to Astoria.
BRIEFEST ( OMMI"XfCATIO\
The Oneonta brought news that all
on board the lightship are well except
Captain "Wioklund of the life saving
crew, who is suffering from an injured
arm. The Oneonta was unable to get
Into any except the briefest communi
cation with those on the lightship.
It was learned that one of the sur
vivors was Erick Lindmank, the Rose
crans' >=hlp carpenter, but the names of
the surviving quartermaster and that
of the dead oiler were not ascertained.
Fred Peters, one of the quartermas
t jr-fc,- «♦ xya» cashed ashore on North
beach, was brought here late today.
Before leaving Ilwaco Peters attempted
to identify the eight bodies that have
come ashore. He remembered all of
them as belonging to the crew, but was
unable-to recall the name of only one,
George Nelson, one of the quartermas
ters.
TEI.I.S THRILMXG STORY
Peters told a thrilling , story of hfs ex
perience f;om the foundering of the
Rosecrans unti! he was pulled out of
tb« water at Tioga station. Peters said
tba\ with Third Officer C. R. Palmer,
T7no vii in charge, he was on the
bridge of the steamer when it struck.
He said h* believed the wrec% was
-caused by Palmer mistaking North
head light for the Columbia river light
ship.
NIGHT TVAS WILD O\E
He •* d that there were eight men on
duty at the time of the disaster and 28
men in their berths. The night was a
wild o-'e, but it was decided by the
officer in command that it would not
be vary hazardous to attempt the
entrance fb the Columbia.
In the storm and rain the man at the
wheel, according to Peters, mistook the
north headlight for the light of the
lightship which Is anchored off the Co
lumbia and. gauging his position by
the wrong light, steered the vessel off
her course, the disaster resulting.
SHIP'S BACKBONE BROKEN
The backbone of the Rosecrans was
broken and "there was nothing to do
but wait," according to Peters. Efforts
to launch the lifeboats were futile.
The wind and waves broke them from
their lashings before any of the crew
could man them. The 36 men on board
waited bravely for death which ap
peared certain. Captain Johnson stood
at hia post in the pilot house directing
the men, while himself suffering from
a broken leg.
Peters had just talked with his com
manding officer. when a big wave
washed over the ship, carrying him
overboard. He seized a plank and rode
it for five hours. Finally he drifted
ashore and, crawling on his hands and
knees, reached the beach, where he
was taken care of by watchers and car
ried to the residence of M. V. Marks
at Troga.
MFE SAVER TEI.LS STORY
Peter Kruis, the injured life saver,
who was a member of the crew of the
Fort Cranby lifeboat which turned
turtle on the very brim of the wreck,
is a sturdy sailor from Holland.
Propping himself on his pillows at
the hospital, he told his story. "I've
pulled an oar through many a mass
of combers, but that little trip yes
terday was the worst I have ever gone
through. Though the Rosecrans struck
about 5:30. It was not until Oarsman
Theodore Roberrange went to the top
of the hill about S o'clock that we
discovered the stranded vessel.
"It seemed to us that it had started
in over the bar on the wrong course
and when the captain saw his mistake
he dropped both anchors. That's what
held him so far from shore. If it
hadn't been for those anchors the
vessel would have come in far enough
so that we could have got our breeches
Continued oa Pave 2, Column 3
Veterans of the Rail Honor the Builders
Anniversary of 1863 Celebrated at Capital
Miss Eva Lowry, who unveiled the tablet commemorating the first spadeful of earth in the beginning of work on the
Central Pacific, and Colonel William H. Crocker, who presided at the meeting at the Tuesday club.
AT LEAST HALF OF
CITRUS CROP LOST
Twenty-five Millions Said to
Be Damage; Railroads
Heavy Sufferers
I <>s AXGEI.ES. Jan. B.—Rain began
fnlllnK here at 11 o'clock tonight. Re
port* from the section north of l,oi An
gelee and aoatb the I Hinrh&pi Indi
cate that the precipitation 1* general.
Rain hait been falling at Bakerafleld
■Ince early evening and Santa Barbara
alao reported a ateady downpour.
LOS ANGELES, Jan. B.—Twenty-five
million dollars was the amount fixed
by concensus of opinion regard
ing , the loss sustained by citrus fruit
growers In the three days' freeze end
ing thie morning. This figure is not
official. Earl G. Dezell. assistant gen
era! manager of the California Fruit
Growers' exchange, said today that ac
curate estimates of damage could not
be made for several days, but $25,000,000
is regarded as a conservative estimate.
Other estimates run as high as $40,
--000,000.
Oranges advanced 50 cents a box on
the Los Angeles wholesale market to
day. This was a direct result of the
freeze. Grapefruit, which also suffered
heavily during the last three days of
freezing weather, went up 23 cents a
box.
WORST EVER. SAYS FORECASTER
Temperatures around 30 degrees
were expected in some sections of the
citrus region again tonight, but the
weather bureau assured growers that
tomorrow morning would mark the end
of the present necessity of burning
smudges in the groves.
According , to an official statement
made by the Los Angples Chamber of
Commerce, which concluded today a
careful inquiry into the damage to
citrus crops, the early estimates fit
loss have been greatly exaggerated.
"All expert opinion," continues the !
statement, "are to the effect that the
actual damage will not be known for
at least two weeks. Later examina
tions may show that not over 30 per
cent of the fruit had been materially
injured, depending on weather condi
tions."
WARM WAVE STII.Ii FEARED
A report from Pomona tonight says
that the growers are more optimistic,
as reports from that section indicate
that probably 60 per cent of the crop
may be saved. While the present mod- \
crating weather is of benefit to the
fruit, a warm wave or something more
than a slow thaw would be disas
trous.
With markedly higher temperatures
prevailing, smudging was successful
last night in saving oranges and.lemons
that had been only slightly nipped by
the record cold of the previous t*tao
days.
Many groves were reported unin
jured in the vicinity of Rialto in ?an
Bernardino county and Fullerton near
Santa Ana, 35 miles southeast of tx>s
Angeles, and near Exeta and Lemoore
in the San Joaquin district. The grow
ers saw a ray of hope in the fact that
a sudden thaw, which was feared last
night, did not materialize. The weath
er bureau assured the citrus men Aat
the return to normal conditions would
be gradual.
"With the fruit thawing slowly,
much of it can be saved," said W. S.
Palmer, president of the Claremont
Citrus association. "Therefore it tan
not be said yet that the crop is lost."
Although the foliage of the trees in
Continued on Pee* 2. Coluaia 4
j "An Independent Newspaper ,
CENTURY PROBLEM
NEARING SOLUTION
Director of Lick Observatory
Discovers Mystery of
"New Stars' ,

BERKELEY, Jan. B.—Dr. William
Wallace Campbell, director of Lick
observatory, and one of* America's
distinguished scientists, has per
haps discovered the cause of new
stars —phenomena which f*r nearly a
have baffled astronomical lore.
Numerous ingenious hypotheses have
been advanced since ".Nova .Persei," the
most famoas of these apparitions, ap
peared among the constellations; but
in light of subsequent study, none have
been tenable. Popularly, it was sup
posed that these celestial objects,
which burst suddenly upon the vision
where before stars had never been
seen, were new orbs flashing into ex
istence. Doctor Campbell dispels this
supposition.
lie has'announced in explanation a
theory based on the fundamental
mechanical laws which ordain In as
tronomy a* well as •in terrestrial
physic*. And he suggests as the cause
of these brilliant apparitions, celes
tial conflicts —a veritable warfare of
Continued on Page 3, C'olnmn 5
WEATHER FORECAST:
I n«ettle<ls eliofrer»; warmer; moderate woath wlwdw.

WEEK ftee — for $2 we cnre ('■tarrh. deafness
and a»tfttn«; for $5 we cure blood poigon wlth
•• ■ MijfKEIiIDEON: NO OPPOSITION: $1,250; rent
jW>Q- over fair; olcars $150 month.
.„ For Cwrtlnuation of These Advertisements Se*
Classified Pages
FINDS NEGRO WHO
TOOK OIL LETTERS
Deputy U. S. Marshall
I Serves Subpena on Long
Sought W. W. Winklefield
(Sppcisl Dtepatcfa t< The Cain
CHICAGO, Jan. B,—Willie W. Wink
| field, the negro messenger who stole
i the famous" "Archbold" letters frani
jthe Standard Oil company files In New
j York and sold them to representatives
of "William R. Hearst, was found In
Chicago today after a four month's na
tionwide search.
Hβ was served with a. subpena to
testify on January ll beforj the senate
committee on privileges an# el sctions.
Scores of Burns detectives hive been
ransacking the country for month»
running down clews to .Winkfield's
whereabouts. Sergeants at arms of
the senate have been equally busy, it
remained for a Chicago United States
deputy locate him by a
strateg;em.
Winkfield In wanted by the senate
committee to -tell just how he pot the
letters that have so stirred political
circles, dragging In . the names of
scores of senator?, representatives in
coggress, governors and judges as hav
ing been alleged beneficiaries of the
liberality of the oil truet.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
BRONZE TABLET
UNVEILED OVEB
SACRAMENTO'S
HISTORIC SPOT
Where First Spadeful of
Earth Was Turned Start
ing Work on Construction
of Old Central Pacific,
Destined to Link West
and East Slopes, Thou
sands From All Parts of
State Brave Snowstorm to
Witness Pretty Ceremony
SAN FRANCISCANS
GO UP ON SPECIAL
Retired ana Present Em
ployes and Officials of Pio
neer Road and Union and
Southern Pacific Cheer as
Pretty Maiden Pulls Cord
Releasing American Flags
From Monument; Then
the Old Timers Get To
gether and Swap Stories
(Special Dispatch to The Can)
SACRAMENTO, Jan. B.—Fifty years
ago today one of the world's greatest
railroad building tasks wae undertaken
—great becauee it was as big a task in
ita time as the construction of the
Panama canal, allowing for the crude
machinery then in use and the lack of
labor. Today, January 8, 1913, round
ing out the half century of the life of
what is now the Union Pacific, retired
employes of the old Union Pacific and
present officials of the Southern Pacifk
company commemorated the occasion
by unveiling a bronze tablet erected
on the spot where the first spadeful o*
earth was turned to start the Centra!
Pacific railroad on its way toward
binding the Atlantic and Pacifi.
of the United States.
The day was eventful in more way*
than one. At noon a snowstorm bqcS
as the Sacramento valley has not f\
perienced in decades covered the city
with a mantle of white. The crowd
stood shivering at the corner of Fitii
and X streets, where the tablet is ;U
tached to the company's freight lmiV
ing, and waited patiently for the ?an
Francisco special, due at 1 p. m.. bin
which did not arrive until nearly .'
o'clock.
RAIL VETERAN* BRAVE EI.EMKVIS
About 1,000 former railroad men were
in*the street facing the speaker's stand,
and the white haired veterans of th?
rail patiently braved tl>e elements an.l
talked over the good old days when
"railroading wasn't so easy as it is
under modern systems."
The San Francisco special, bearing
100 retirtd and active railroad workers,
left that city at 9 in the morning, but
was delayed at several points on the
route. On the train were William H.
Crocker; General M. P. Chipman, an
especial guest of honor; Vice President
E. E. Calvin of the Southern Pacific,
General Manager W. R. Scott, H. R.
Judah, Charles S. Fee, M. E. Gates.
J. M. Davis, T. H. Goodman. James
Hosburg Jr., John P. Irish (selected to
represent Prof. David Starr Jordan,
who was to have delivered an address , ,
but was prevented *y illnesg), and
many former railroad conductors,
freight men and officials.
STORIES OF OLD DAYS TOLD
During the trip of the special from
San Francteco stories of the bygone
days of railroading were told ami
.wraptly listened to.. R. A. Donaldson.
EITHER
STRAIGHT
IN" A
HIGH BALL
OR WITH
BOORD'SDRYGIN
.MAKING A
BALLOR MARTINI
CHARLES MEINECKE & CO.
»«tHT» r*cin» «*A*T, *14 titiiMUT* «t . b. r.

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