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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 14, 1913, Image 1

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THE CALL ISSUES A FOURTH EDITION AT 6 A. M. DAILY CONTAINING ALL THE LATE WORLD AND CITY NEWS
HfJChest Temperntore Yesterday. 54j Lowest Sunday
Mttbr. 4fi. For ilcti.ll* of the \\ rather see pnfte 8.
Snini IFraiadsts© Mais
Behind it the Sacramento valle}', 4,000,
-000 acres in extent, and the San
Joaquin valley, 7,000,000 acres.
VOLUME rXIM.—XO. 45.
FULL PENALTY
IMPOSED UPON
ARCHBALD BY
SENATE VOTE
Judge of Commerce Court Is
Found Guilty on Five of
Thirteen Articles of Im
peachment Filed Against
Him by House of Repre
sentatives —On the First
Count Verdict Is 65 to 5
for Conviction — Penrose
Is Steadfast for the Jurist!
MAY NEVER AGAIN
HOLD PUBLIC OFFICE
Second Case in History of
United States to Carry
With It Extreme Sentence
Authorized by Constitu
tion—Accused Remains in
Committee Room With
Wife, but Son Keeps Tally
From Gallery of Chamber
for Part of Proceedings
(Special Dispatch >.o Tbe Call)
WASHINGTON. Jan. 13.—Dismissal
frotn office and disqualification from
ever holding an office of honor, trust
or profit under the United States
again, the full penalty for conviction
of impeachment charges, were im
posed upon Judge Robert W. Archbald
of the commerce court by the senate
today.
•Judge Archbald was f
he charges presented in five of the
thirteen articles filed against him by
* c house of representatives. The vote
varied from 65 to 5 for conviction on
the first count to a narrow two-thirds
majority necessary to convict on
others.
There was also a marked divergence
of opinion among senators as to im
posing the full penalty provided by the
i onstitution.
The vote wv 39 to S3 for imposing
!1 penalty, in this case only a
majority vote was necessary.
THIRD SI < < T.SSFI I. CASK
The conviction under impeachment
i barges is the third in the history of
he .United States and only the second
ar carried With it the full sentence
authorized by the constitution.
In 10 of 13 impeachments tried by
the senate since the beginning of the
government the respondents were held
not guilty.
When the senate went into session
as a court of impeachment at 1 o'clock
to make its decision in the case, the
hearing of which has occupied its at
tention since December 3, an unwonted
air of solemnity prevailed in the chan
ter.
All the senators, with the exception
of the few who had been excused from
voting, were in their seats and the gal
leries were filled when the managers
on the part of the house and the coun
sel for the respondent took their seats
facing the rostrum of the presiding
officer.
JFDGE I.V COMMITTEE ROOM
Judge Archbald remained In a com
mittee room, but his son, Robert W.
Archbald Jr., who has acted with his
r ansel, was present when the first
• jnt was taken.
Each of the articles of impeachment
was read, some charging the respond
ent with high crimes and misdemeanors
In office; others merely reciting that he
was guilty of misbehavior, and Senator
Bacon, president pro tern, presiding,
put the questions' to the senate:
"Senators, how say you? Is the re
spondent, Robert W. Archbald, guilty
or not guilty of the charge contained
in this article?"
The roll was then called, and
senator, rising in his place, made the
response, "Guilty," or "Not guilty."
FIVE STICK I \TII. END
Only five senators—Burnham, Catron,
Oliver, Paynter and Penrose—voted to
dismiss the first count Sixty-five sen
ators voted for conviction. The five
senators who voted for dismissal on
this count, stood by Judge Archbald to
the end and voted similarly on all the
other counts.
Only one senator, Ashhurst of Ari
zona, voted for conviction on all of
the 13 counts. On the other counts
the other senators voted In some cases
for conviction and in some for ac
quittal.
The number "13" appeared
spicuous in the proceedings of the final
day of the trial. The numbers of the
first four counts upon which Judge
i Archbald was convicted totaled 13.
J The last count was numbered 13 and
sentence was imposed on the 18th
day of January.
The end of the long fought struggle
In the senate came early in the after-
Contiaued 01 Page ,5, Column 2 I
"The People's Newspaper"
DUC'S LUMPY JAW
CAUSED COMMENT
Distinguished Visitor Detained at
Dock While Officials Find He
Suffers From Toothache
(Bp«da] Df.pafh to The Cain
BOSTON, .7an. 13.—Due Dp la Morte.
a Piedmontes, who says he has come
to America to vim the Alfred G. Van
derbilts and other relatives, was de
layed an hour today after he arrived on
the Red Star liner Manitou. The due
had <-. badly swollen fa< c. so he was
held while a special hoard of inquiry
investigated his case.
The nobleman told the board his
grandmother was Elizabeth Davis of
New York, and that through her he
triaf related to the Yanderbilts apd
other families In the 400.
After hearing- the story the special
board found it was only a plebian
toothache which afflicted the nobleman,
so it was decided he.was not in danger
of becoming a public charge, and he
was given the "entre" to Boston and
the United States.
— »
RECTOR PLAYED RAGTIME
Contrregrntlon Disapproved, Now Minis
ter In Without Position in Parish
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK. lan. IC—Because the
Rev. William Ehrhardt tooted a cornet
at a country dance he is out of the
rectorship of St. Pauls Episcopal
church of Butler, X. J., today. The
rector joined the Haycock band of But
ler, which recently played at a dance
and the parishioners have oeeri dis
cussing the appropriateness of a
clergyman playittg "turkey trot" music
and "bunny hug scores. Following the
gossip his connection was severed.
DEN IN LONDON WEST END
' <..-iiiil>lini; Raid Show* Society Women
Mere Heavy Loners
i! Cable tn f_£ c :i \},
LONDON, Jan. 13.—Astonishing reve
lations of gambling in London's exclu
sive West End wore made today at j
j Westminster police court when two j
j men were lined $2,500 each for eon
j ducting a gaming house in a fashion-!
jable thoroughfare of Belgravia. Let- j
! tere were found in the house which !
[showed large amounts were lost and!
l-'he V which loser . %'iv In- ;
| eluded women prominent in society,)
j were reduced.
TRAIN BREAKS A RECORD
Bears Sick Child From Salt Lake to
Los Aneelen in Twenty Hours
LOS ANGELES. • Jan. 13.—A special
train arrived today from Salt Lake
City, having made the trip of IrA1 r A miles
in 20 hours, cutting nearly four hours
from the best time previously made
between the two cities. The train was
chartered by Russel &. Schulder, an
attorney of Salt Lake City, to bring to
Los Angeles for medical attention his
4 year old son, Howard, who was suf
fering with pneumonia.
BRIDAL HIKE TO GAYNOR
Fison- Visit Mayor After Honeymoon
Walk From Colorado
(Spe.iai _ii*p*_ch to Tlie Call)
NEW YORK. Jan. 13.—Looking fresh
and bright after walking nearly across
the continent, Mrs. Beryl Gwendolyn
Fison, the 18 year old bride of Percy
L. Fison of Colorado Springs, called at
the city hall today with her husband to
■cc Mayor Gaynor. With them was
their fox terrier, Dudie. They walked
here from Colorado Springs.
SPECIAL BATHTUB BUILT
Professor Taft to I-avc Him Frame in
Miniature Swimming Pool
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW HAVEN. Conn., Jan. 13.—The
entire sixth floor front of the Hotel
Taft has been set apart as the apart
ment which President Taft will oc
cupy when he comes here to take up
his residence. A special bathtub will
be built for Professor Taft which will
be large enough for the ordinary
sized man to enjoy a swim in.
FIRE CHIEF IS CAUTIONED
Head of I.oa Angeles Department Has
Been Going Too Fast
LOS ANGELES. Jan. 13.—The fire
commission decided today- that Fire
Chief Archibald Eley had been going
too fast to fires and instructed him
not to drive "too rapidly nor too reck
lessly" in futur§. Chief of Police
Sebastian also ordered motorcycle of
ficers and patrol chauffeurs not to ex
ceed 25 miles an hour in the business
section.
SLEUTH GETS 180 DAYS
Pharmacy Board Detective « onvleted of
Stealing 123.50 in Stockton Raid
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
STOCKTON, Jan. 13.—Dick Bernstein,
v detective in the employ of the state
board of, pharmacy, was sentenced to
day to serve 180 days in jail for ap
propriating $23.r,0 while raiding an
opium den in Stockton's Chinatown.
SPURNED, HE ENDS LIFE
Lo- Angeles Man Commits Suicide »t
Sweetheart'- Feet
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 13.—Life with
out pretty Beatrice Robertson pre
sented so dreary an outlook to Walter
If. Leonhardt, a young chauffeur that
be killed himself In the presence of
the girl today when she refused to
marry him. ]
THE CALL
SAN FRANCISCO. TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 8. **
Society Matron Who Was Slain at Dinner Party
Bride of Few Months Shot to Death by Husband
BAKED BEANS ARE
MAILED BY PLANE
Parcel Post Aviator Flies From
Boston to Providence
With Edibles
(Special Dlspati h to The Call)
PROVIDENCE, R. 1.. Jan. 13.—Harry
M. Jones. America's first aerial parcel
post man. brought Boston baked beans
by biplane today from the Hub to
Providence on the first stage of his
Boston-New York flight with postal i
matter under government direction.
The daring young aviator made his
flight in 59 minutes over a course
which he estimated to be 54 miles In
length. Muffled in two overcoats, a life
saver's reefer and three jackets, be
sides being wrapped from head to
thighs in newspapers, Jones was cold
only on his finger tips, he said. His
thermometer touched S degrees above
zero. He*,carried small pots of baked
beans—slightly cooled—lntended for
postmasters of cities along the line of
his flight, each duly stamped with par
cel post stickers.
MRS. DONALD P. JADWIN
KNOX CANAL NOTE
DUE TODAY TO BE
NO SURRENDER
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.—Secretary
Knox of the state department will pre
sent to President Taft and the cabinet
tomorrow the reply of the United
States to the note of Great Britain
asking for the arbitration of the. canal
tolls dispute.
The note of Secretary Knox, it was
learned tonight, is lengthy and asked
Great Britain for a definition of the
issues which it desires submitted to
arbitration.
President Taft fs still Inclined tow
ard arbitration by an "impartial court"
but this dees not mean necessarily
The Hague. He is anxious that Great
Britain first state in concise language
the issues as Great Britain sees them.
Then, when the record is before him,
he will decide the action that should
be taken by the United States.
While it is known that the Knox
note will not be a final refusal to ar
bitrate it will not be a surrender. On
i the contrary, It will reaffirm the Amer
ican position and will ask for a clearer
'definition of the issues as Great Brit
ain sees them.
The entire cabinet and the president
himself will go over Knox's reply and
probably will mcke suggestions for
changes.
"An Independent Newspaper"
FIFTY THOUSAND
MARCH AND SINE
"MARSEILLAISE"
[ (Special Dlspatrh to The Cain
NEW YORK, Jan. 13.—Fifty thou
sand men. women and children
marched, cheered and sang the "Mar
seillaise" today in one of the greatest
strike demonstrations ever witnessed
in this city. It was the protest of the
striking garment workers against con
ditions they are seeking to remedy in
the factories and sweatshops.
More than 200 police along the* line
of march prevented any disorder,
though at Union square, where the pa
rade disbanded and the strikers gath
ered to Hsfen to speeches by Mrs. Rose
Pastor Stokes; Ephraim Kaufman, gen
eral organizer of the Cutters' union;
William Karlin. a well known socialist;
Benjamin Schweitzer, organizer of the
garment workers, and other prominent
labor leaders, the crowd was so dense
that the officers had their hands full.
Six bands furnished inspiration for
the marchers. Several started playing
rag time selections, but were quickly
shut off and ordered to play nothing but
the "Marseillaise."
Conspicuous in the line of march were
the "martyrs," 1» girls, who were re
leased from Raymond street jail, in
Brooklyn, today, after several days'
imprisonment for disorderly conduct
while on picket duty. They were cheered
all along the line of march. I
BEAUTIFUL YOUNG WOMAN
KILLED BY HUSBAND IN
PRESENCE OF HER FAMILY
Donald Jadwin, Wealthy Clubman, Divided From
Bride of Few Months, Follows Murder by Suicide,
Dropping on Floor With Two bullets in His Brain—
Tragedy Is the Result of Well Planned Scheme on
Part of the Slayer—Witnesses, Horror Stricken, Are
Unable to Prevent Consummation of Terrible Act
DOMESTIC QUARREL SEPARATES PAIR;
YOUNG MAN RESORTS TO DRINKING
Wife's Refusal to Talk Over Telephone Followed by His
Appearance in Dining Room, Where Relatives and
Friends Are Seated at Dinner—Mother, Grandmother,
Uncle, Aunt and Brother See Fearsome Deed—Vic
tim's Death Almost Instant—Slayer Expires at the
Lane Hospital—Crime Is Kept From His Mother
Interrupting a family dinner party in the home of Mrs. Anna Bauer,
2512 Pacific avenue, Donald Jadwin, a wealthy young business and club man.
shot and killed his beautiful 20 year old wife, formerly Miss Minna Van
Bergen, from whom he had been separated for about 10 days, and then fired
two bullets into his brain. .
The tragedy occurred about 7 o'clock last evening, and an hour later the
crazed young husband died in the Lane hospital.
Young Jadwin had been drinking heavily since the quarrel with his
wife a little more than a week ago, when he left the Bauer home, where they
had been staying for about a month previous.
Mrs. Jadwin refused to see her husband repeatedly, and about an hour
before the shooting last night he telephoned to her. When she heard his
U. OF C. TO TAKE
LEAD IN FORCING
COURT REFORMS
First Lecture in New Uni
versity Extension Course
Bitterly Assails Judi
ciary of Country
r
BERKELEY, Jan. 13.—1n one of what
is regarded as the most remarkable doc
uments ever published by the L'niver
sity of California, Thomas H. Reed, as
sociate professor of government, sur
veys public administration in state
and nation, utters a scathing criti
cism of the judiciary and recom
mends as a corrective for governmental
defects a program of reforms almost
revolutionary in scope and nature.
"At present the courts are not genu
inely respected, because they are not
respectable, yet respect for the courts
lies at the basis of civilization.'"
WHY fOIRTS ARE >OT RESPECTED
So reads one of Professor Reed's gen
eralizations. The condition which he
describes in such drastic terms is im
puted by him to four chief causes, which
he thus summarizes:
"Slowness and uncertainty of justice.
"Narrow technicality, which leaves
the poor defenseless.
"A carrying too far of the doctrine of
injunction, until the great laboring class
looks on the judiciary as its natural
enemy.
"Undue devotion to the interests of
property."
Five reforms. Professor Reed asserts,
will restore the courts to dignity and
efficiency. He defines these reforms as
follows:
"A judiciary of highly paid legal ex
perts, appointed for good behavior.
"More judges in some places and
harder work by judges in others.
"A verdict in criminal cases by three
fourths of the jury.
"Reform of l°gal ethics.
"Provision for easier amendment of
the United States constitution."
APPOINTIVE POWER FAVORED
The short ballot and direct elections
are both unequivocally Indorsed by
Reed as salutary and essential reforms.
In the 'state he would have only three
elective executive officials—the gov
ernor, lieutenant governor and con
troller.
To the governor he would confide
amplest appointive powers. The mem
bers of the governor's cabinet, ap
pointed by him, should each head a
department, and each should have in
his department appointive power, sub
ject to a civil service law. The super
intendent of public instruction, how
ever, should be appointed by a board
which in turn would be appointed by
the governor.
And not only in the state, but in local
—-— : _ I
Continued on Page 4, Column 1
WEATHER FORECASTi
Rains hrt-k to high month wind-.
fU.OOO— Cmt X 20.000; FATHER AND MOTHER.
see thin grand home for jou and the children.
»' ii in-estlgate; 12 large, gimnr
rooms und 2 baths, garage: in San Mateo; eT
tra large, cor. grounds; beautiful trees and
For Continuation of Thin Advertisement
See classified Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
voice over the telephone she hung up
the receiver and declined to talk.
The members of the family, includ
ing the dead woman's mother, Mr.-.
Edward A. Van Bergen; her brother.
Nicholas Van Bergen, and some young'
women guests, had been seated at the
table but a short time when young
Jadwin entered the room. HI:;
entrance was a complete surprise. It
had been necessary for him to slip
into the house through the servant*'
entrance in the basement, for since the
quarrel he has been refused admittance
to the house, which was the eeahe c!
the young couple's fashionable wedding
June 6 last.
Without a word of greeting. Jarfwin
walked around the table and leaned
over the back of his wife's ehalr to
kiss her. None thought to int.
him.
As his lips met those of hie wife he
pressed two revolvers into her bosom
and pulled the trigger of one of them
twice. The other, an automatic Qolt,
he did not use. The stricken young
woman stood up convulsively an.
sank in a heap at her murderer's feet.
TWO BILLETS IN BRAIN
Turning the same weapon—a 32 cal
iber Iver-Johnson—on himself, Jadwin
then fired two bullets into his brain and
dropped in his tracks.
Paralyzing horror kept the witnesses
fast in their seats at the table until it
was too late to interfere.
Besides the mother of the murdered
woman there were present at. the din
ner table Mrs. John A. Bauer, her grand
mother; Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Foster,
her aunt and uncle: Miss Enid Foster,
their daughter; Nicholas Van Bergen.
Mrs. Jadwin's brother, and a youns
woman guest whose name has not been
revealed. -
Charles J. Foster, husband of the
dead woman's aunt and head of
& Co., jewelers, told the story of tfe.o
double crime an hour afterward.
UNCLE TELLS SAD STORY
"We were all seated at dinner when
Donald came in. He got in through the
kitchen, for we haven't been letting
him see Minna since their quarrel of
about a week ago, He entered the d •
ing room, and before any of us con |
realize what, he intended to do he
grabbed his wife and fired two bullets
Into her breast.
"Then he raised one pistol, or n
Stop Squinting
and wear /4f"%y
Equipoise f« JV
eye glasses
there will be v %,^ t
no trouble to
keep them on
securely and com- j am
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Wear Equipoise
CALIFORNIA OPTICAL CO.
(W.D.FeDnlmore J.W.DaTIs A.E.Kennltaore)
ISI Post St San Kraneiaro
12_!1 Broadway Oakland
«,y. !_. Hogue at Oakland Store.;

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