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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 16, 1913, Image 1

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THE CALL ISSUES A FOURTH EDITION AT 6A. M. DAILY CONTAINING ALL THE LATE WORLD ANDqiTYNEWS
Sl'Jf , * T'raperature Yesterday. SO; Lownt Tueaday
■Ma-at, 42. For detail* of the Weather nee pace 15.
San Francisco Has
A HARBOR 4 TO 10 MILES
IN WIDTH WHOSE MEAN
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
HIGH AND LOW TIDE IS
ONLY 4.3 FEET : : : :
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 47.
BANDIT KEEPS A
LEDGER BALANCE
ON ROBBERIES
Entries in Found in
Pocket of Holdupman In
dicate He Is Responsible
for Long Series of Raids
on Ticket Offices of Rail
way Lines in the East
wTAKEN AFTER RACE
THROUGH STREETS
Agent Refuses to Obey Com
mand to "Get Into Corner"
and Gives Alarm —High-
wayman Flees and Tries
to Elude His Pursuers by
Bolting Into Barber Shop
BOSTON, Jan. 15.—The lone bandit
whe has held up half a dozen railroad
ticket offices in New York and Penn
sylvania in the last month was cap
tured today in this city, the police
belfeve, when William J. Clayton, a
husky young man. was taken Into cus
tody, after a sensational chase follow
!nc an attempted daylight robbery.
Clayton says he came from San Fran
cfeco.
A diary found In one of Clayton's
pockets gave what the police -feelieve
to be a list of railroad ticket office
robberies, with the amounts which each
netted. The list follow?:
"December 17. New York, "Wells Far
go. $500; December 23, Buffalo. Grand
Trunk, $327; January 2, New York, Erie,
$6so: January 10. Philadelphia. Erie,
$300; January 11. Pittsburg, 8., H. and
P.. $54; January 14, Philadelphia, S. P.,
$127."
MONKV ORDERS FOUND
V. The total amount of the sums hit
ticmed is $1,688. The police also found
$29 In cash and more than $1,000 in
Wells Far go money orders in Clayton's
possession.
The attempted robbery here occurred
this afternoon at the ticket offices of
the Boston and Maine railroad.
Clayton, who had just purchased a
ticket for Pittsfield, suddenly pointed a
revolver at Cashier George Hackar, or
dering: him to give up all the money he
had. As H*ckar was slow in comply
ing. Clayton flourished the revolver
again and ordered every person in the
office to get into a corner.
VAULT* OVER (OIXTEU
All complied except George Titcomb.
a railroad ticket agent. The bandit
nad vaulted over the counter to rifle
the cash drawer, when he saw Titcomb
rush out the door. Instantly he vaulted
back ovf-r the counter, without taking
any Money, and dashed into the street,
with the oftire Eeree after him.
Then followed a ra<*e through the
business streets of the city, officers
who conducted the pursuit not daring
to fire at the fugitive because of the
crowds. The man finally bolted Into a
barber shop.
Hβ had just ordered a "shave in a
hurry" after throwing his overcoat and
hat to one side, when an officer entered
and arrested him. He offered no resist
ance.
Clayton confessed tonight, police offi
cials say, to the robberies which he
had noted in his djary. In his state
ment Clayton is said to have included
a robbery la Cleveland on January 10,
although his diary referred to him as
having been in Philadelphia on that day.
J?\ <* police declared an officer attached
"*•■ he local artillery district had identi
fied the prisoner as William G. Mon
tague, who deserted from Fort Banks,
Winthrop. Mass., two years ago. His
home was in Yuma, Ariz. Clayton reg- j
Jstered .'»t the hotel where he stayed!
last night as from Thorne, Nev.
A GREAT
DETECTIVE STORY
Mgnsifur D°naque
By ARTHUR TRAIN
Good detective stories are
hard to find. "M. Donaque" is
one of the best produced in
later years. This is the first of
the exploits of this remarkable
man, who brings all the re
sources of scient fie chemistry
to the unravelment of crime.
Arthur Train was Assistant
District Attorney of New York
for a number of years and is
the author of "True Stories of
Crime," "The Confessions of
Artemas Quibble" and other
stories.
M. Donaque will
appear in NEXT
SUNDAY'S CALL
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
"The People's Newspaper ,,
RICHMOND MINISTER
TRAPPED IN CHURCH
Rev. Frank Horn, Hiding From Parishioners, Is Caught in
Sanctuary, but Completely Vanishes Again Before
Searching Party Members Are Able to Seize Him
KH'HMOXD, Jan. Iβ.—Shortly after
ntirfnigrbt Rev. Mr, Horn, at the nolicita
tlon of >Irs. P. Church and other
friend*, came down from hid hiding
place in the attic of the church. He
said that he locked himeelf In hi« Ntiidy
and later hid in the loft to avoid fur
ther interviewa. Id regard to the arti
cle* identified by Mr*. Mac de Tovrea,
The sudden departure of Rev. Frank
Horn, the Richmond Baptist minister
accused of leading a dual lile, from his
rooms at 112 Nichol avenue, in the
Contra Costa city, ostensibly to visit
Oakland in search of evidence to estab
lish his identity; the discovery of ar
ticles in his effects belonging to Mrs.
Eva Mac Metz de Tovrea. the deserted
wife, late yesterday afternoon, the
accidental finding of the missing cler
gyman hidden behind the pulpit of the
church last night by two of the dea
cons and his second mysterious flight,
either by a jump from a window 12
feet from the ground or else to a secret
hiding place in the inner recesses of
the big loft of the edifice, are the start
ling developments in the strange story
rapidly unfolding across the bay.
MATCH KEPT UPON CHURCH
In the belief that the clergyman,
now unmasked as a married man who
has used the cloak of ministry to fur
ther his designs upon young women
and girls, still is within the church
building, a close watch is being kept
upon the structure. All night friends
and enemies alike watched .the differ
ent exits, waiting for the man honored
as pastor for eight months by the lit
tle Richmond congregation, to come
forth and explain his remarkable ac
tions of the last 24 hours.
A partial search of the loft failed to
reveal any positive traces of Horn, and
TITANIC CLAIMS
TOTAL MILLIONS
Manager Harris Valued at
$900,000 More Than
Painter of "The Angelas'
NEW YORK, Jan. IS, —A flood of pe
titions for damages through the lose
of the steamer Titanic filed today in-
eluded one from Mrs. Irene Wallach
Harris, who demands $1,000,000 for the
loss of her husband, Henry B. Harris,
the theatrical manager. This is the
heaviest of the 27!) claims so far filed.
Mrs. May Futrelle of Scltuate, Mass.,
asks $300,000 compensation for the loss
of her husband, Jacques Futrelle, au
thor. The claim of Mrs. Lilly B. Mil
let, widow of Francis D. Millet, the ar
tist, a Titanic victim, is $100,000.
United States Judge Hand extended
yesterday the time for filing petitions
to February 11. The claims amount to
more than $10,000,000. but the- White
Star line contends that its liability is
limited under the United States statutes
to less than $100,000, the value of re
covered wreckage and passage money.
SAVING OF FUEL SHOWN
Instruction Car la Being Taken Over
*>>»iem to Make Demon»tratfoni»
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
CHICAGO, Jan. 15—Tiie Illinois Cen
tral road is making use of moving
pictures to illustrate the possibilities
of economy in the use of fuel. An
instruction car, carrying moving pic
tures and lecturers on fuel economy,
is being taken over the lines of the
system, making stops at every division
point. Lectures are delivered in the
morning:, afternoon and evening.
WATER SUPPLY CUT OFF
lee Pile* l"p Over Intake and Town
Reaortft to Explosive*
CALUMET, Mich., Jan. 15.—Heavy
northwest winds and heavy seas have
piled the ice over the intake pipe of the
Calumet and Hecla Mining company's
water works plant on Lake Superior,
which supplies water to Calumet, strut
ting off the water supply to half of
Iloughton county's population. The pub
lic schools were forced to close today.
Dynamite is being used to break up the
ice.
LIQUOR SENT IN COFFINS
Oklahoma Undertaker Indicted for Vlo-
Intlnu Interstate Booze Law
FORT SMITH. Ark., Jan. 15.—0n a
charge of attempting to ship three
coffins filled with intoxicating liquors
from Arkansas to Oklahoma. L. S. Bill
ings, an undertaker of Muskogee, Okla.,
was indicted by the United States grand
jury here today. Billings recently went
to Los Angeles.
ASHES BY PARCEL POST
Remain* of .Japanese Woman Sent
Through Mails to Oriental Home
(Sp*ri«l Dispatch to The Cell)
SAX JOSE, Jan. IS. —A srmall package,
containing the -ashes of a Japanese
woman, was forwarded today by the
San Jose postoffice by parcel post to
her old home in Japan.
SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO Q.
BULLET!*'
he said they had been kUci» to him by
friend*, nvhoe* name* be withheld. He
announced that he had derided to re
main in Richmond, and retained C. A.
(lark, a local attorney, to represent
him. Chief of Police Arnold placed a
guard over the church and the Church
home, to prevent the clergryman from
disappearing; nirain.
further investigation was abandoned,
owing to the darkness which hid dan
gerous pitfalls and the possibility that
the man, evidently desperate, might
take human life if cornered.
Stranger than fiction was the re
vealing and subsequent disappearance
of Horn, or rather De Tovrea. Mrs.
de Tovrea's identification of the arti
cles is considered to have established
beyond a doubt the preacher's real
identity and to have dissipated into
thin air his self-toH tale of a twin
brother, the "black sheep" of the
family.
PREACHER rOIXD HIDING
Shortly before 6:30 o'clock last night
Deacons Paul Dunlap and F. Stout
entered the cfcurch to see if everything
was all right and to announce to the
members of the choir that there would
be ».o choir practice. Both men had
come directly from the home of the
clergyman, where they had seen Mrs.
de Tovrea again identify the silver
spoon, a wedding gift, a knitted doily
and a leather box as hers.
While Stout remained in the vesti
bule to turn on the church lights Dun
lap, with a premonition that all was
not right, hastened down the aisle and
entered the hall back of the pulpit,
leading to the pastor's study. Hardly
had he lifted the portier covering the
doorway leading from the rostrum
Continued on Pace 2, Column 4
SUFFRAGETTE? NO!
BUT PANCAKE, YES
Tetrazzini Has Temptations That
Run to Syrup Rather
Than Politics
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
CHICAGO. Jan. 15.—Madame Luisa
Tetrazzini was greeted by a throng of
opera stars, sleuths, press agents and
photographers when she stepped from
the Twenty Century limited today.
She seemed elated because despite
temptation she still is a total abstainer
from pancakes.
"Pancakes," said she, "are my beset
ting sin. Of course the things we most
desire are the things we can not have.
Oh, no; it is not that I am getting fat;
I am getting thin. I am seven pounds
thinner than last season. But, oh, my
pancakes' I just love them swimming
in maple syrup."
In answer to a question she said:
"No; I am not a suffragette."
She is said to know 33 roles in opera
and to have eleven of them ready to
sing at a moment's notice.
RIOTS OVER OPIUM TRADE
Two Pornon* Killed and Many Wounded
In Pitched Battle In Shanghai
SHANGHAI, Jan. 15.—Two persons
were killed and many wounded as a
result of a pitched battle today over
the attempts to suppress the opium
traffic. Officials of the Shangtu and
neighboring districts were patrolling
with a military escort to enforce the
order of prohibition against the cul
tivation of opium when they were set
upon by 1,000 armed supporters of the
opium traffic. A fight ensued, in which
both sides fired several volleys.
WOMEN TO RIDE HORSES
Mr*. Gun Rublln Will Head Troop From
»w York
(Social Dispatch to The Call)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 15.—A troop of
cavalry women, headed by Mrs. Gus
Ruhlin, wife of the former prizefight
en, will ride from New York to Wash
ington to participate In the petticoat
pageant, the afternoon before inaugu
ration day. It was announced at the
headquarters of the suffragettes today
that already there are assurances that
there will be more than 10,000 women
in line.
BITTEN THUMB IS FATAL
Charge of Mnnalnughter PaeeM Man
Who Chevied Ip Opponent In Fight
MILWAUKEE, Wls., Jan. 15.—Joseph
Soh ramkowski may have to face a
charge of manslaughter because he bit
the thumb of Michael Kosobucki in a
free for all fight some time ago. Koso
bucki died today from the injury, and
Schramkowski is being held pending
the coroner's investigation.
FORGETS $62,500 FORTUNE
Pancal Hlxon So Absent Minded That
Money I* No Real Object With Him
ST. LOUIS, Jan. 15.—Pascal Hlxon,
a railroad clerk, is so absent minded
he forgot an appointment today at
which he was to claim a legacy of
*fi2,500 to which he is heir and the
police were called upon to remind him.
t
HANDSOMEST MAN
BADLY BOTHERED
By PRETTY MAID
Telephone Calls From Miss
Freed to Walter Speyer
Run Nine to Nineteen
During Day
DESPERATE VICTIM
APPEALS TO COURTS
Warrant Issues for Stenog
rapher, Who Gives Bond
for Her Appearance
Because she thinks Walter S. Speyer,
bachelor, general manager of the New
Zealand Insurance company, is the
"handsomest man in town," Miss Mollie
Freed, a pretty and efficient stenogra
pher, has formed the habit of telephon-
ing her idol from 9 to 19 times each
day, with the result that the object of
her affections has caused a warrant to
be issued which charges her with dis
turbing- the peace.
Miss Freed, who lives with her sister
in the apartment hotel at 1544 California
street, dors not mind her arrest a little
bit. "Xoxv maybe I'll get a chance to
talk to him in court." she said. A short
time later her attorney, Elliot M. Ep
steen, who had advised her to surrender
to the authorities, arranged for her bail
and bond, which tvere $10 and $100, re
spectively.
♦•HAXDSOME WALTER"
Already Air. Speyer is known to his
business associates in the insurance
district as "Handsome Walter." and he
has the good grace to blush behind his
spectacles and "Ja«k Barrymore" mus
tache every time he hears it.
"Now, listen," he said yesterday as he
I led a couple of reporters out of hearing
of his employers *n tfn» N*«w Zealand of
fices at 334 California street. "There is
nothing to this 'joy ride* stuff. I never
took this girl out in my life. Honest.
She has been calling me up for months
I and months. Gets me out of bed long
after midnight. Saturday we kept count
of her calls, and in'tlie forenoon alone
there were 13 of 'em. 1 tried to get the
telephone company to do something, but
it was making too many nickels out
of her and refused to interfere, saying
my only recourse would be to throw a
brick at her. The company refused me
permission to swear at her over the
telephone."
Mr. Speyer appealed to the yojjng
woman's most recent employers, the
British Bank of North America, with
the result that she finally was *dis
charged.
MISS FREED I,AI GHS
"I should worry," laughed IftM Freed.
"There are lots of jobs: but, really and
truly, don't you think he is handsome?
I have known Mr. Speyer for some time
now. We became acquainted about two
years after the fire. At that time I
was working for the Providence Wash
ington Insurance company at 300 Cali
fornia street. J. F. D. Curtis, the man
ager, and Mr. Speyer are great friends,
and that is how we met. He used to
telephone me, but I never realized I
cared for him until we quarreled over
the telephone some months ago, and
since then I have been unable to get
him to talk to me."
Last week Speyer appealed to the
police. "Big" Fogarty of the bank dis
trict detail was assigned to help him
straighten out the affair. The police
man called on Miss Freed, who readily
admitted that she had been'telephon
ing , Mr. Speyer.
"But I didn't know he considered it
an annoyance," she said.
SII.KNT FIVE LONG DAYS
During the period of the next five
days, Mr. Speyer was almost happy.
There were no telephone calls from
his admirer. Just as he was congratu
lating himself that troubles were
over, she began again. She increased
the number of calls from every half
hour to one every ten minutes. Monday*
Mr. Speyer went to the hall of justice
and demanded a warrant. What he
got was a citation for Miss Freed's
appearance in court. She came willing
ly enough, for wasn't Mr. Speyer to
be there? He was, but lie was care
fully guarded by "Big ,, Fogarty.
Attorney Epstcen secured a week's
grace for his client on her promise
that she wouldn't telephone Mr. Speyer
any more, but she just couldn't resist
calling him and yesterday she began
again. This time Mr. Speyer's appeal
was answered and Judge Shortall is
sued the warrant charging the young
woman with disturbing the peace.
Although Mr. Speyer has put a tem
porary damper on Miss Preed's tele
phoning, that instrument still i 8 caus
ing him a lot of bother. About every
5 minutes he hears the voice of hla
business associates saying:
"Oh. you handsome Walter. Naughty,
naughty," and "That's all right, we
were young ourselves, once," and other
things of the sort.
Mr. Speyer is rapidly exhausting hie
vocabulary of intense and burning
words.
I "An Independent Newspaper 9 * |
HELLO! IS THIS WALTER?
Listen, Dear, This Is Mollie
Miss Mollie Freed, discharged from situation and arrested for disturbing
peace of business man whom she called on telephone until his patience was
exhausted.
BIG ARSON TRUST
FLOUTS THE LAW
Stupendous Plan of Organ
ized Incendiarism in
Chicago
(<9s*clal Dispßl'-h to The Ch'.U
CHICAGO, Jan. 15.—With the indict
ment today of Joseph Clarke for an
alleged attempt to bribe the assistant
states attorney not to prosecute an ar
son case, as a text A. A. Bach, chief
deputy state fire marshal, told a re
markable story of organized incendiar
ism.
"Chicago has the highest fire insur
ance rate of any city in the country,
and 30 per cent of its fires are incen
diary,' , Bach said. "The firebugs are
not banded together as one gang, but
there are several groups at work, and
the rivalry among the different bands
is as keen as is the competition be
tween any class of tradesmen. There
are three men in Chicago known as in
surance adjusters, who often get to
fires before the firemen. They sleep
with their clothes on, have automobiles
in readiness, and, receiving tips that
a fire is about to be started, are on
their way almost before an -alarm
comes in.
"The adjusters do not actually start
fires themselves; they employ men to
do that—men who actually solicit the
business. The adjusters make tljelr
money by adjusting the losses. De
tectives "and firemen generally know
the name of the arson firm that is re
sponsible for each fire. It is nothing
unusual for a fireman to say 'this is a
—— fire' or 'Mr. was responsible
for this touchoff.' "
Batch said that the firebugs know
that they are suspected, but that they
are very clever.
"It is possible for any one to get a
building fired in Chicago," he con
tinued. "There are fixed charges for
the work, and the man who desires
to burn his property will find incendia
ries bidding against each other for the
job. For small fires there is a regula
tion charge of 20 per cent of the in
surance collected. Charges vary ac
cording to the magnitude of the fire.
For large fires the charge Is 1 per cent,
and even at that price the fire bugs
grow rich. Ido not know a single
conviction for arson in Chicago in the
last IS months."
Clarke was released tonight on a
$10,000- bond, signed by his wife.
State's Attorney Hoyne declared to
night that he had evidence that Clarke
recently gave a dinner at hie home to
almost every member of the so called
"arson trust."
The inquiry, said Hoyne, gradually is
widening and now involves officials of
insurance companies, independent fire
adjusters and adjusters employed by
insurance companies. Hβ still refuses
to make public any names of those
said to be in the "ring" except Clarke.
. WKATHKR'F'ifKJEtAST:
moderate .—»<» <yJn«i». changing to vrmt.
"**•".. ' "■, '".-■"' "
«*• - ' '
PPTRKKCT CMMATE
Neypr too warm—Nev«r too cold.
BEATTIFri. Sr-HNKKY.
HPHlthfii! I-.x-ality.
NO MALARIA.
For Continuation of Thin Advertisement
See Ciaaeified rases
WILSON MAY MAKE
GOETHALS OFFICIAL
President Elect Shows His
Appreciation of Work
Done on Big Ditch
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
TRENTON, N J, Jan. 15.—President
elect Wilson said tonight that he had
Invited General George W. Goethals,
the Panama canal builder, to confer
with him on Friday at his office here.
The president elect's announcement that
he would confer with Goethals is be
lieved to be an indication that he will
name him governor general of the canal
zone after his inauguration, despite the
opposition of some of the leading demo
crats in the senate.
That President Taft will b? appointed
to the supreme court of the United
States 4>y Mr. Wilson if congress passes
the bill introduced by Senator Gore,
providing for two additional associate
justices was the assertion made by
senators in the confidence of the presi
dent elect today. President Taft ap
pofcited two democrats to the supreme
court in the course of his term and
also elevated # a democrat to the chief
justiceship. It is said that Governor
Wilson has discussed Taffs impar
tiality with considerable enthusiasm,
and has definitely said that if the op
portunty presented itself he would wel
come the chance to fullflll the life
ambition of the present chief execu
tive by placing him on the supreme
court bench. .
WILL HAVE PARTY SUPPORT
There is every present indication
that the incoming: president is to have
the hearty support of his party. There
is not a whisper of dissent and you
can not find a "reactionary" democrat
in the senate with a fine tooth comb.
Governor Wilson is in constant com
munication with the leaders in con
gress and knows just what they are
doing and planning to do| while they
know what he wants them to do and
are willing to conform.
The new congress will be organized
promptly and without difficulty.
Speaker Clark will be re-elected and
thef ways and means committee will
fill the committee vacancies. The tariff
legislation will be ready for introduc
tion into the house as 'goon as it is
organized and will be pushed with
vigor.
President elect Wilson "stood pat"
on his Chicago and Trenton speeches
and did not show the least alarm about
the reports from New York that Wall
street was excited and in a panicky
state as a result of them. "I stand
pat," was his laconic remark when the
reports were called to his attention
this morning, and later in the day he
said:
"1 have given no consideration to the
reports that Wall street is disturbed
by my speeches.' .
President elect Wilson was backed
Continued on Page 2, Column 6
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TURK CRUISER
ELUDES GREEKS
AND ATTACKS
ISLAND FORTS
Steams Out of Dardanelles
and Passes Unperceived
Through Lines of De
stroyers — Appears Off
Syra and Bombards Pow
der Magazine and Coal
Depots — Wrecks Elec
trical Power Station—
Fires on Auxiliary Cruiser
ALLIES THREATEN
TO HALT PARLEY
Balkan Delegates Declare
They Have Not Weakened
in Determination to Re
sume War in Case of Otto
man Evasion, but Say
They May Withhold Ex
ecution of Resolve a Few
Days Longer Out of
Deference to the Powers
ATHENS, Jan. 15.—The Turkish
cruiser Medjidfeh performed a daring
feat in a heavy fog last night.
She steamed out of the Dardanelles
and passed unpercelved through the
lines of the Greek destroyers cruising
off the straits.
She appeared at noon today off the
island of Syra. one of the Cyclades, and
bombarded the powder magazine and
coal depots. These were not damaged,
but the electrical power station was
wrecked.
The Medjidieh also flred on the
Greek auxiliary cruiser Macedonia,
which was undergoing repairs in Syra
harbor. When 15 shells had been fired,
the commander of the Macedonia, after
landing his crew to maintain order in
the town and to strengthen the guanl
over the Turkish prisoners, sank the
Macedonia in the harbor to prevent
her destruction by the warship.
The Medjidieh then left in the direc
tion of Smyrna. The Greek fleet has
been ordered to intercept her. So far
as is known, the other Turkish war
ships have not left the Dardanelles.
DANGER POINT IN
CONFERENCE NEARS
LONDON, Jan. 15. —The Balkan na
tions wish the world to know that they
have not weakened in their detorrp. i -
nation to resume hostilities unless Tur
key accepts their terms quickly. But,
In deference to the powers, they may
withhold the execution of their resolve
a few days longer than seemed likely
yesterday.
Aβ allies, they inaugurated the doc
trine of "the Balkans for the Balkan
peoples," and they declare they propose
to maintain the right won by their
united armies to be considered a great.
Independent people and manage their
own diplomacy according to their own
national interests. While they are will
ing to concede a brief period of delay
for Turkey's answer, it is not with a
view of resuming negotiations on any
modified basis.
ALLIES STEADFAST
The Balkan nations have not changed
their terms since they were presented
December 28. while Turkey has yielded
all along the line, except a* regards
Adrianople and the Aegean islands.
The allies have adopted their attitude
to convince Turkey that no alternative
is possible for the conclusion of peace
except compliance with their original
demands, but they wish to avoid alien
ating the sympathies of the powers, and
for this reason they have decided to
await patiently the result of the note of
the powers tovConstantinople.
Turkey, they say, may meet the noif
in three ways. She may refuse flatly to
follow the advice of Europe, ehe may
STRAIGHT
DISTILLED BY
GRKKMIHIKR DISTILLUIIY CO.
Nrlion County, Kt.
CHARLES MEINECKE & CO.
Mm~l PMirte Ce*»T. Sl4 ••ckamsnt* St.. s. r.

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