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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 25, 1913, Image 1

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The demand for The New Call's 6A. M. edition is increasing. It has been a winner from the start
rtigrhcHM TcinppfHlnrc Ve«*erdajr, JW* Lew« 4 Thoriidny
"M«lil, 42. F«r iJ**taHs of «h** Whether nvv pesro 10.
SAN FRANCISCO HAS
A $2,020,000 municipal street
railway system in operation.
VOLUME CXtEL— NO. 56.
RIGHT RAND MAN
OF MORGAN SAYS
NO MONEY TRUST
Lengthy Statement Prepared
by H. P. Davison and Ac
cepted by Pujo Committee
as "Argument" Attributes
Financial Co-operation to
"Weak Banking Law"
JAMES J. HILL ON
Sf AND SHORT TIME
Northwestern Empire Build
er Testifies if Minority
Stock Holders Be Given
Directorial Representation
Competitors Could Steal
Secrets of the Corporation
"WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—Accepting
Aβ an "argument" a lengthy statement
by Henry P. Davison of J. P. Morgan
Sk denying the existence of a money
trust and attributing the co-operation
among: financial interests to the "weak
banking: law," the house money trust
Investigating , committee closed today,
for the time being, its financial probe.
The committee will begin within a week,
consideration of its report, which will
recommend changes in the national
bank law and legal control of various
financial agencies.
Mr. Davlsons statement \va* an
β-nalytlcal argument teased on the ta
bles and charts presented to the com
mittee, "purporting to show control
of $25,000,000,000 of resources by ISO
directors.**
BEVIES TRUST'S EXISTENCE
The statement denied this conclu
sion and set forth specifically that the \
flrro of Morgan & Co. "believes there .
is no such thing either in form or
fact, as a money trust." The commit
tee did not allow the statement to go
into the record as testimony, but al
lowed it to be recorded as an "argu
ment."
Mr. Davison differed with Counsel
Untermyer as to the concentration of I
money and credit, and declared that i
the concentration not only was not a *
peril, but had been a benefit to the
country under present conditions. He
said the situation could be remedied
only when the currency system was re
formed. When asked if he believed the
concentration should be extended he
declined to answer.
JAMES J. HIM, TESTIFIES
James* J. Hill, the railroad magnate,
accompanied by his son, Louis W. Hill,
and his counsel, former Senator John
C. Spooner, appeared ready to testify.
Counsel Untermyer, for the committee,
eaid Mr. Hill's examination would be
brief.
Mr. Hill opened his testimony with a
list of his directorships In New York
and Chicago banks, and In the Great
Northern and Burlington roads. Mr.
Hill said that the Great Northern and
the Northern Pacific railroads were
competitors.
When the Northern Securities com
pany -was dissolved, he said, he re
ceived 37,000 shares of Great Northern
and 62,000 shares of Northern Pacific.
He now has 20.000 shares of Great
Northern and his son, Louis W. Hill,
has 13,500 shares. Mr. Hill, testified
that he was a director in the First
National Bank of St. Paul, one of the
largest banks in the northwest. He
disagreed with Mr. Untermyer's sug
gestion that minority stock holders be
given representation in directorates
through cumulative voting. Hβ said
that such a system might allow com- j
petitors to gain a corporation's secrets j
by obtaining a place on its board.
CHARACTER OF MAN ALL.
On the question of interlocking di-
Mr. Hill said he held that the I
propriety of the practice rested en
tirely upon the character of the mdi- I
vidual man.
Mr. Lane opposed the principle of j
Continued on Page 2, Column 7
GROOM IS 34, BRIDE IS 70
Widow of Former Awrmor Surprises
Friends by Marriage
(Special Dispatch to Tbe Call)
SACRAMENTO, Jan. 24.—Friends
here of the widow of Thomas H. Ber
l<ey, for years assessor of Sacramento
county, learned today of her marriage
last September near Stockton to Theo
dore Wold, formerly manager of the
Goodyear Coat company of this city.
Wold is 34 years old and his bride
upward of TO. They are now on a tour
of the southern part of the state. Mrs.
Wold is wealthy.
MYLIUS' CASE IS DELAYED
Federal Judge Fnitt pones for One Week
O'-elsinn on Habeas Corpus Writ
NEW YORK, Jan. IM.— Federal
Molt postponed today for one
W«ek his decision on the \vrit of
habeas corpus in the case of Edward
F. Myllus. the Belgian journalist, or
dered deported as an undesirable
Mylius -will spend the week on Ellis
island The writ, if granted, would
. crive him Kis freedom under bond until
ourts determine whether he may
<":.ter the country. I
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
"The People's Newspaper"
King Alfonso Plans
To Visit America
During Next Summer
Spanish Ruler Will Make
Tour if Kingdom's Poli
tics Permits Trip
JjOXDOX. Jan. 24.—There is a prob
ability that King Alfonso of Spain will
visit the United States, possibly next
slimmer, should the pcflltlcal situation
In his kingdom permit. Alfonso has
heon greatly Interested In a trip to the
United States since a visit to that
country by the son of his minister of
war.
It is understood that the matter Is
being considered by the Fpanish gpv
ernrnent.
In a recent conversation with Senor
Azoarate. the republican leader and
vice president of the Spanish chamber
of deputies, King Alfonso remarked
that he was considering making a visit
to the American continent.
PROMOTER GUILTY OF
DEFRAUDING MRS. BULL
Magnesia Aaheatoa Firm Head « on-
vleted Two Years After
Victim Dies
NEW TORK, Jan. 24.—John a Qua
lcy, president of the Magnesia Asbes
t*s company, was convicted tonight of
grand larceny in defrauding Mr?. Mary
Nevins Bull, -widow of William T. Bull,
the noted surgeon, out of $35,000 by
inducing her to purchase stock in the
company, which afterward suspended.
Qualey was remanded for sentence
Monday. Harvey A- Corbett, an archi
tect and former instructor in Columbia
university, who was indicted jointly
with Qualey, will be tried next week.
Corbett testified for the state in
Qualey's trial.
Mrs. Bull died nearly two years ago,
and her testimony, given at the time of
early proceedings, against Qualey and
Corbett read into the evidence.
ONE DEAD. FIVE OTHERS
BELIEVED SEA VICTIMS
Launch Helen Not Heard From in
Storm Which Ragei In Prince
WUHain Sound
VALDEZ, Alaska, Jan. 24. —One Iβ
known, to be dea£ and five others are
believed to have been lost in the storm
on Prince William sound. The launch
Mermaid was wrecked in the narrows
off Valdez bay today and Charles Risa
was drowned. M. A. Linguist. Rua's
companion, reached the beach and was
rescued by natives.
It is feared that the launrh Helen
and five men, on way from Ellamar to
Valdez, have been lost in the storm.
On the Helen are Clarence McLough
lin. George Hayes, Charles Anderson
and two others. They were last heard
from when they left Jacks bay Tues
day after putting in to make repairs
to their engine.
EASTERN GRASS FOR ELK
Three Carload* Leave Y'eilowatone park
for Allegheny Ranges
ST. PAUL, Minn., Jan. 24.—Three car
loads of elk from Yellowstone national
park, shipped out to provide wider
grazing area for remaining animals,
arrived here today. One of the cars
was consigned to Clearfield, Pa., an
other to r.enova. Pa., and the third to
Marlington, W. Va. Recently two cars
of elk were taken to Redding, Cal., by
C. C. McCrea, past exalted ruler B. P. O.
Elks.
ROAMER GETS A FORTUNE
Man Knocked About Country for Dec
ade Inherits f56,000
After being knocked about the coun
try from the Atlantic to the Pacific and
from the Canadian border to the Rio
Grande for the last 10 years, during
which time he was searching employ
ment, Lewis V. Lawton, 33 years old.
who now lives in this city, has been
advised that he is the heir to a fortune
valued at $86,000.
HINT OF GRIM TRAGEDY
Film of OH on Sea Polnls to Founder-
Ing of Steamer
NEW YORK, Jan. 24.—Hint of a pos
| eible .=ea tragedy was brought here to
day by the tank steamer Energie from
Tuxpan, Mex., which reported having
passed through a film of oil on the sur
face of the gulf of Mexico. It is be
lif.ved that the oil on the water came
from a foundered tank steamer.
LOCK CASHIER IN VAULT
Bank Robbers l.srape With $3,500 In
Currency and Silver
OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla., Jan. 24.
After robbing the State bank of
; Mounds, Okla., today and locking
j Cashier C. T. Brown in a looted vault,
\ three masked men escaped with $3,500
in currency and silver. Two hour*
elapsed before the imprisoned cathler
was released.
itHCe FOR THK LOSS OF AS EYE
(Special Dispatch to Tie tail)
HANFORD, Jan. 24.—Because a cork
flew out of a demijohn of ammonia and
put out one of his eyes Leland Cong
don has brought suit in the Kings
county superior court against the Cal
ifornia Drug and Chemical company of
Los Angeles. Hβ seeks $45,000 pecu
niary damages, $300 hospital expenses
and $.300 for loss of time.
SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY JANUARY 25, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 10.
RAILROAD BOARD
NUT DECIDE FATE
OF SPRING WILEY
Sutherland Introduces Bill
Giving Power to Fix and
Judge Condemna
tion Price
WILL REACH ALL
PUBLIC UTILITIES
Measure Assumes to Give
Judicial Powers Subject to
Supreme Court's Review
CALL BUBEAT7.
SACRAMENTO HOTEL.
Sacramento, January 24.
GEORGE A. VAN SMITH
Assemblyman Sutherland introduced
a bill in the legislature today designed
to enable the state railroad commission
not only to fix a condemnation price on
the Spring Valley properties, but to sit
!n final judgment upon that price. His
action followed a request of the city
attorney of Ran Francisco. *
While the bill is admittedly designed
to reach the Sjjfing Valley company
and the dispute between that corpora
tion and the city of San Francisco, it
is necessarily broad enough in its pro
visions to reach any public utility that
might he sought to be condemned by
any city, county, town or municipal
water district.
JUDICIAL POWERS GIVEN'
The bill assumes to give the railroad
commission judicial powers, subject
only to review by the supreme court.
That assumption is based on the con
stitutional provisions under which the
appointive railroad commission wa.«
authorized and created. The particular
provision is found in the following
language used in the constitutional
amendment adopted two years ago:
"The authority of the legislature to
confer such additional powers is ex
pressly declared to be plenary and un
limited by any provision of this con
stitution."
The prescribed procedure Involves
notice ol intention to condemn, and
an application to the railroad commis
sion to assess the condemnation price.
The commission Is then to give hear
ings, and on these hearings base its
finding. If its findings were not re
jected by the supreme court its price
would be the condemnation price be
yond the reach of the superior judge
before whom the subsequent condemna
tion proceedings would be brought.
BILLS FOR CITY'S BENEFIT
Among a series of the bills designed
to simplify condemnation proceedings
for the benefit of the city of San Fran
cisco are the following:
Repeal of the disqualification of a
tax payer to sit on a condemnation
Jury.
P'.xtending to water districts the
Continued on Pagre 3, Column 1
DARROW JURY LACKS
ONLY TWO MEMBERS
Of Ten Men in Box One Iμ Septnagen-
arlau Attacked by Attorney* ,
Defense
LOS ANGELES. Jan. 24.—Four ad
ditional jurors were sworn today to
try Clarence S. Darrow on the charge
of having bribed a juror in the Me-
Namara case, leaving only two places
to be filled. Shortly before adjourn
ment for the day, the special venire
of To summoned today was exhausted,
and the trial went over until Monday
so that 50 more talesmen could be
called.
The 10 men now in the box Include
John Farley, the septuagenarian, who
was the object of attack by the defense
on the grounds of alleged mental and
physical disqualifications. Judge Con
ley declined to excuse Farley on the
showing of the defense today, and the
Darrow counsel passed him when ex
ercising peremptory challenges.
The state used no peremptory chal
lenges today and the defense exer
cised two.
It is generally believed that the jury
will be completed Monday, when the
second week of the trial will begin.
AVIATOR HAS CLOSE CALL
Blakely and Pasnengrr Fall One Hun
dred Feet Into Marik
While flying about 100 feet above the
Alameda marshes yesterday afternoon
Aviator H. W. Blakely and a passenger
fell to the ground in hie biplane when
the propeller flew into a myriad of
pieces.
Neither of the men -was hurt, but
Blakely admitted it was his most nar
row escape from death.
The propeller is said to have been
flefectlve.
INSTALL STANFORD MAN
T.ARAMIE. Wyo., Jan. 24.—Clyde
Augustus Dunlaway, formerly of the
faculty of Leland Stanford Jr. univer
sity, California, was inaugurated presi
dent of the University of Wyoming
here today. Among the speakers were
David Starr Jordan of Iceland Stanford
Jr. university. Chancellor A very of the
University of Nebraska *ud Governor
Carey of Wyoming;.
PEACE HALTED BY SITUATION
Turkey's New Cabinet Needs Firm Foreign Minister
Turkish officers who fired on an aid, and one q\ whose bullets killed Nazim Pasha, commander of the Turkish army,
and the gate of the sublime porte in Constantinople, where the tragedy occurred. |
GREAT NORTHERN
TRACKS FOR MILE
BURIED BY SLIDE
Week's Work Needed to
Clear Line From Debris
Left by Washington
Avalanche
SEATTLE, Jan. 24. —An avalanche
today swept down the Cascade moun
tainside at Windy Point, west of the
west portal of the long tunnel, and
buried a mile of the Great Northern's
track. The snow upon the rails is
nearly 60 feet deep in places.
Telegraph wires to the summit are
down, but the operator at Scenic, who
can see the slide above him, estimates
that it will require a week to clear
the track.
A suow slide west of Laconia, on
the Milwaukee railroad, at midnight
last night, caught two rotary plows
and an engine, killing Arnold Jacobson
of Seattle, a laborer. Five other men
who- were buried were dug out little
injured.
Rain has been falling along the
whole length of the mountain division
of the Northern Pacific since yesterday
and mountain streams are threaten
ing. There have been small slides, but
of snow only, and rotaries have kept
the rails clear.
Rivers in western Washington are
rising rapidly. Farming land between
Seattle and Tacoma will be under
water tomorrow, it is feared. Ap
parently nothing but a decrease of tem
perature can prevent washouts and
floods.
DEATH SUIT THROWN OUT
Los America Court Hold* 5t,000,000
Action la "Irreaponalble"
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 24.—The $1,000,
--000 damage suit filed by John Lapique
against Catherine Agoure, her daugh
ters and her In which he alleged
that he had been damaged to that
amount by the death of Mrs. Agoure'a
husband, Pierre Agoure, was thrown
out of court today by Judge Frank R.
Willis.
Lapique asserted that he had formed
a partnership with Agoure, a short
time before his death last November,
to acquire realty at $1,000,000.
"Citizens should not be harassed by
legal proceedings instituted by Irre
sponsible persons," said Judge Willis
In his ruling;
"An Independent Newspaper*'
FRESNO SHERIFF
HALTS A $14,850
FRAUD ON BANK
Prisoner Believed to Be No
torious Swindler Wears
Red Wig and Two
Suits of Clothes
(Spwlal Pißpttch to The Call)
FRESNO, Jan. 24.—With the arrest
of William J. Reid on a charge of at
tempting to swindle the Commercial
Bank of Sanger out of %1 4,850, Sheriff
Walter McSwain thinks he has in cus
tody one of the most notorious bank
swindlers in the United States. The
arrest was made Tuesday in Sanger,
but Reid was not formally booked un
til .today.
At his preliminary examination this
afternoon he admitted the draft was a
forgery. Reid says he is president of
the National Automobile Protective
association of Chicago and president
of the William J. Reid Manufacturing
company of Steger building, 28 East
Jackson boulevard. Chicago.
He deposited the draft Saturday in
the Sanger bank, saying he was inter
ested in real estate in the local
ity. The Sanger bank communicated
with the Fresno Bankers' association
and learned the draft was fraudulent.
Reid phoned to Sanger from Fresno
asking if the bank would honor a
check on his draft and received an
affirmative answer. The sheriff was
notified and reached Sanger before
Reid, and the arrest followed.'
Upon being examined at the jail he
was divested of a red wig and was
found to be wearing two complete
suits of clothing.
He deposited $1,000 in a Fresno bank
several days before his arrest. He is
about 45 years old, and his aged pa
rents are supposed to live in Los Ange
les. A sister, Miss Ethel Reid, ar
rived in Fresno after receiving a tele
gram from him statins that he was
in trouble.
AVIATOR'S LONG FLIGHT
Frenchmaa Soar* From Pan Orer the
Pyreneca Into Old Madrid
MADRID, Jan. 24.—M. Bldor, a
French aviator, flew from Pau, I'rance,
across the Pyrenees and landed here in
safety today. He stopped at Guadala
jara, Spain, for fuel. His course over
the mountains was at a hei&tU uK 9,000
feeU ■S^
WFVrmSR FORK* AST!
Cloud yi. log In mornliiKi light F.. wind,, changing t» W.
Afld lfasp f>n inodorn Hat of .>Toomgjf B' T '
TOR A JI»I>KRX EfCK on SIX
—* —■ ...1...,.
SEE CLASSIFIED TKC&¥OR CONTINUATION
OF THESE ADVERTISEMENTS
Berkeley Woman's
Dogs Start Today
In Alaskan Derby
Five Teams Will Compete
With Mrs Darling's Ani
mals in Nome Race
NOME. Alaska, Jan. 24.—Six dog
teams will start tomorrow in the 65
mile Solomon derby, the first dog race
of the season, for a big purse raised by
the merchants of Solomon. The weather
is clear ami cold, the temperature today
being 20 degrees below zero, and the
trail Is fast.
The course is from Nome to Solomon
and return.
The entries include A. A. (Scotty)
Allan, driving the dogs owned by him
and Mrs. C. E. Darling of Berkeley,
Cal.; John Johnson, driving his Siberian
wolf hounds; O. Blatchford, Alexander
Holmsen and Sing lllayuk.
PLATT ON NEW TEA BOARD
fan Francisco Man to Help Establish
Standard
cSpecSal Di«patch to The Call)
TVASHINGTON, Jan. 24.—Secretary
MacVeagh appointed today the follow
ing new tea board to establish stand
ard samples of pure tea, free of color
ing matter, to govern importations. ,
during the tea season of 1913, begining
about May 1:
It. C. Morrison, Chicago; Charles B.
Platt. San Francisco; H. G. Wood
worth, Boston; E. R. Rogers, Tacoma;
C. E. Wyman, St. Paul; Herbert Perry,
New York, and George F. Mitchell, the
treasury department's tea expert.
The board will be convened In New
Tork February 3, when it will select
the standards.
SEAMEN ARE DROWNED
Mall Steamer Prlnceaa Clementine Col.
lldea With Bark Off Dover
LONDON, Jan. 2 4.—The mail steamer
Princess Clementine was in collision
with the Norwegian bark Heimdal to
night between Ostend and Dover. In
lowering a boat to take off the crew
of the Heimdal, which filled rapidly,
the second officer and one seaman of
the Princess Clementine were drowned.
The crew of the bark were taken off
eafely.
WIFE COSTS HIM PLACE
West Point Cadet Dlamlaaed for
Absence Without Leave
(Specltl Dispatch to Tbe Call)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.— Elmora
Dier, the youngest West Point cadet
who eloped with Miss Florence A.
Davis of Buffalo, has been dismissed
from the military academy, following a
court martial on the charge of being
absent without leave to get married.
DTTO C. GREGOR IS DEAD
District Attorney of Humboldt Suc
cumbs to Heart Trouble
EUREKA, Jan. 24,—0tt0 Clayton
Gregor, district attorney of Humboldt
county for the last 10 years, died here
today of heart trouble. He had been
confined to his bed several weeks by a
etroke of paralysis. A widow and four
children survive liim. v^
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
POWERS VIEW
WITH GREATEST
CONCERN LATE
DEVELOPMENTS
Young Turks Regain Partial
Prestige in Selection of
Enver Bey to Command
Army—People Refuse to
Consent to the Surrender
of Adrianople — General
Opinion Is That War Will
Be Resumed —Balkan Del
egates to Peace Conference
to Await Developments
NEW GRAND VIZIER
IS GERMAN PROTEGE
Death of Nazim Pasha Due
to Dereliction of European
Powers, Is Statement by
Reschid Pasha—Advices
From East Say Ottoman
Empire Is in Better Shape
Than Ever for Carrying
On War—Drastic Action
to Be Delayed Pending
Policy of Nations Trying
to Arrange Settlement
LONDON, Jan. 24.—Some days must
elapse before the Bituatlon arising
from the revolution In Constantinople
becomes clear. As far as may be
judged, there is no Intention on the
part of the new Turkish government
to force matters or to resume hostili
ties if any reasonable compromise with
the Balkan allies is possible.
A dispatch from Constantinople to
night says the council of ministers sat
today to discuss the reply they will
make to the note of the powers, and
it Is believed this reply, while insisting
on the retention of Adrianople by Tur
key, will point to Thursday's demon
stration as a real manifestation of the
national will.
The new government Is finding dif
ficulty In filling the post of foreign
minister. The portfolio has been of
fered several of the Turkish ambas
sadors abroad, but thus far all have
declined It. Until the ministry Is com
pleted by the appointment of a sheik
ul-Islam and a foreign minister It is
probable that no definite steps will be
taken. Developments In the situation
are awaited throughout Europe with
the greatest concern in view of poeslble
active intervention by Russia,
DELEGATES WILL WAIT
The Balkan delegate* to the peace
conference in London show no desire
for precipitate action. They have ac
cepted the advice of the ambassadors
of the powers to await the reply of the
new Turkish government to the am
bassadors' note before forming any
resolution as to their future pro
cedure.
An opinion among the delegates In
regard to the situation is divided. Some
maintain that It is useless to wait
longer in view of developments at Con
stantinople, which are considered elo
quent proof of the attitude of the new
ministry. Others take the view that
it is impossible for Enver Bey to be
taken seriously.
In addition, they argue, the Young
Turks, who lost power owing to the
absolute unpreparedness of the country
under their regime in the war with
Italy, can not now have the support of
a majority of the people as the same
unpreparedness for which they were
responsible further has been demon-
Sansome Street
Two story and basement brick
building, 37:8x137:6.
Under lease to one tenant.
Price. $20,000; rent, 9150 per mo.
Green Street
Residence Lot
Near Steiner street; 30 ft frontage.
Prloe, *3,n00;
Full mortgage can remain.
Fillmore& Green Sts.
Corner
Grand marine view lot,
87:«5\65:9.
Prk-e, 98,750. Torui*.
HARRIGAN.WEIDENMUUERCO.
V 345 MO.VTfIOMERV ST. J

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