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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 27, 1913, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85066387/1913-01-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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The demand for The New Call's 6 A. M. edition is increasing. It has been a winner from the start
Htirlie«t Tfnp»ra»uff YeMerday. OK; l,owe»t hstiirday
Msrhf, 44. For details of the Weather nee pace 13.
——■ ———.«—^—— i i i
San Francisco Has
an area of 46! 2 square miles and a
population estimated at this due of
TZZ— 480,000
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 58.
CONGRESS DEFIED
BY NEW YORK'S
STOCK EXCHANGE
Brief Filed With Money
Trust Committee Denies
That Federal Government
Has Power to Compel Its
Incorporation or to Regu
late Affairs of Concern
POWER OF EMPIRE
STATE CONCEDED
Business Transacted Is De
clared Neither of Inter
state Nor Foreign Charac
ter ; Rules, Asserts Board,
Forbid Gambling, Short
Selling and Manipulation
WASHINGTON. Jan. 2B.—Members
of the house mnnev trust committee
•who are to draft a report on results
of their inquiry into the financial af
fairs thus far conducted have before
them for consideration a brief just
filed in behalf of the New York stock
exchange by its attorneys denying
that the federal government has power
to compel its incorporation or to regu
late its affairs.
The stat<* of New York, it is ad
mitted in the brief, has power to en
act laws for the guidance of the ex
change, though the belief is expressed
In the argument, that no law, either
by state or nation, will stop certain
transactions. It Is further asserted
at the members of the stock ex
change are better able to control its
affairs than any legislative authority.
BEYOND CONGRESSIONAL REACH
"We assert," says the brief, "that
no regulation whatever is within the
rower of congress. But we are far
from asserting that the state is with
out any power of regulation.
"That the state may legislate with
neet to transactions, such as mi
-- per manipulation is unquestionable.
How effectively it can legislate as to
alter* is another question, i.
is a regulation interfering with and
diminishing the responsible self gov
ernment of such an exchange that
argue against as detrimental in
incalculable degree as well to
the interests of the public as to those
of the. exchange."
ABl SES ARE EXAGGERATED
Defending the rules of the stock
exchange, the brief declares that its
siness is neither of interstate nor
foreign character, "nor do its opera
':<-.ns in any respect come within the
sphere of the federal jurisdiction."
Pules of the exchange, the brief
declares, prohibit manipulation, short
selling and general gambling, reports
< f which are said to be exaggerated
by the general public. The answer
to all charges against the exchange
:s said to lie In the statement that
all transactions are matters between
■ fomer and broker with which the
exchange has nothing to do so long
as highest standards of business hon
esty are maintained.
The brief also contains many legal
decisions submitted to prove that the
k e::"hange can not be subject to
the interstate commerce act.
GENERAL SICKLES STILL
REMAINS AT HIS HOME
Micrlff Will Serve \\ arrant for Arrest
Today If Money Is Not
Paid
NEW YORK. Jan. 26.—General Dan
iel E. Firkles remained undisturbed in
his home today, an order for his ar
rest issued yesterday in Albany re
maining in the hands of Sheriff Ilar-
I r, who decided last night, upon
receiving it, not to serve it until Mon
day.
Tfa« sheriff said tonight that he
would execute tomorrow the order for
the general's arrest unless the sura of
5_j.476 for which he has failed to ac
count, it is charged, is paid.
A movement to raise by subscrip
tion the amount of the general's ;il
indebtedness and relieve the
aged civil war veteran from all possi
bility of going to jail was started to
day by William Sohraer, state con
troller.
INQUIRY NEARING FINISH
Social Evil Investigation to Include
Many American Cities
NEW YORK, Jan. 26.— The elaborate
investigation of the social evil In New
York—undertaken two years ago by
the bureau of social hygiene—ls nearly
completed, and its results will be an
nounce'! nest December, according to a
Matemcnt issued tonight by John D.
Rockefeller Jr. Mr. Rockefeller also
.says that an exhaustive inquiry of con
ditions in European cities has been
made and that the bureau plans to ex
tend its work to other American cities
ARCHDUKE RAINER DYING
Nobleman In 87th Year—Related to
Emperor Francis Joseph
HfENNA, Jan. 26.—Archduke Rainer
of» ■> house of Hapsburg and, there
fore, related to Emperor Francis Jo
seph Is dying. The last sacrament was
administered today. Archduke llaincr
Sim in his eighty-seventh year.
"The People's Newspaper"
MRS. MARTIN OUT
CHAUFFEUR'S FARE
Mrs. Peter D. Martin
Paris Court Orders Her to Re
fund Ticket of Driver Dis
missed in San Francisco
(Special Cable to The Call)
PARIS, Jan. 26.—Mrs. Peter Martin
must pay her chauffeur's railroad fare
from Pan Francisco to Paris. Mrs.
Martin is the wife of Peter Martin, son
of Mrs. JJleanor Martin, San Francisco
society leader. She is a daughter of
C. M. Oeirlchs of New York. She was
sued by Charles Demont, whom she
engaged in Paris and dismissed in San
Francisco.
Demont paid his way back to France,
brought suit against Mrs. Martin and
won the case.
The Peter Martins announced in 1909
that they would leave the United States
and live in Paris. The French capital
has since been their home, but they
make frequent trips to America.
SEEKS CAR'S AID
FOR HARAKIRI
Japanese Lies on Rails With
Upraised Blade Against Pit
of His Stomach
NEW YORK, Jan. 26.—A stylishly
dressed Japanese of fine physique
startled the Sunday crowds in Madison
avenue today by attempting to commit
harakirl with the assistance of a
speeding streetcar.
The Japanese lay prone over the
rails, an ugly looking knife with up
raised blade poised against the pit of
his stomach. The motorraan applied
The brakes. The Japanese, seeing the
car suddenly stopped a few feet from
him, waved the motorman to pro
ceed.
After an exhibition of jiu jltsu with
a burly patrolman the crazed oriental
was removed to Bellevue hospital.
AGED MARINE REPORTER
DIES OF HEART TROUBLE
"Mike" Fitzgerald, Known by Most Sea
Captains In the World,
Breathes Last
'Mike" Fitzgerald, who for nearly
half a century was marine reporter
for the Merchants' exchange, died from
heart trouble at his home, 1016 Green
wich street, at 10 o'clock last night
after an Illness of three months.
The name of Fitzgerald Is known
to practically every sea captain in the
world. For over 40 years he had been'
stationed at Meigg's wharf, and most
of that time, when not dodging spray
in a Whitehall boat, divided his time
between duty and making friends, of
whom he has legion.
Fitzgerald was 54 years old. Born
in Ireland, he came to San Francisco
when a boy and the first job he se
cured was driving the cart that car
ried shipping news from Meigg's wharf
to the Merchants' exchange. Later he
acted as runner for local tradesmen,
going out 20 and 30 miles below the
Farallones in a Whitehall boat to take
orders for butchers, bakers and gro
cers.
Besides Mrs. Fitzgerald, six children
—five boys and one girl—survive the
deceased.
DUKES LIFE ATTEMPTED
Workman's Bullet Graces Spanish
Noble and Wound* Governess
PARIS, Jan. 26.—A Barcelona dis
patch to the Petit Parisien reports an
attempt to assassinate Archduke Louis
Salvator of Tuscany. While the arch
duke was walking in the grounds of
his estate in Miramix in the Balearic
islands a workman employed on the
estate fired at him several times with
a revolver. One of the bullets grazed
the archduke and severely wounded *
governess.
SEATTLE MAN MISSING
BERKELEY, Jan. 26.—The police
are searching for Fred Looney, a
young stranger, who came here from
Seattle a week ago and who has been
missing since last Wednesday. Looney,
who is about 28 years of age, secured
a room in a private family at 1913 Cen
ter street. On Wednesday he left with
about ?150, saying he was going for
a "joy ride", and has not turned up
jet
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
FERRY STEAMERS
CRASH IN DENSE
TREE FOG ON BAY
Bay City and Melrose Col
lide Off Yerba Buena Isl
and and Come Near
Sinking
BOTH BIG BOATS
CRIPPLED BADLY
Passengers Thrown Into a
Panic and Transbay Serv
ice Is Demoralized .
With a deafening crash that shook
both steamers from bow to stern, the
ferry boats Bay City and Melrose col
lided during an inky black tule fog on
the bay midway between Oakland and
this city at an early hour yesterday
morning.
A panic among the passengers im
mediately ensued. The screams of the
women could be heard above the
creaking of the interlocked boats and
men ran wildly about both vessels,
pulling the life preservers from the
racks.
All was confusion, and through the
dense blanket of fog those aboard one
vessel could see faintly the other
craft.
The collision took place at 9:30
o'clock and both boats were well
crowded with passengers.
BOATS WERE MOVING SLOWLY
The Bay City was on the east bound
trip from the Oakland narrow gauge
slip, while the Melrose was west
bound on the creek route trip. The
vessels came together a half mile
cast of Terba Buena island.
Both boats were traveling under
slow steam and each was progressing
under the siren system. Captain Peter
i Wall commanded the Bay City, while
Captain John Hickey was master of the
Melrose.
Lookouts were on station at th« for
ward bow of both steamers, but so
dense was the tule fog that tb* other
boat was not discovered until txlthfff
a few feet apart.
There was a cry of "Ship ahead!" but
the warning came too late. The look
outs' words hardly were spoken before
the vessels crashed.
There immediately was a ringing of
gongs in the engine rooms for back
water. The vessels were locked to
gether for some time, it being feared
that one or both might sink should
they be separated in midstream.
DECKWORK IS SHATTERED
The high deckwork of the Melrose
ploughed through the lower deck of
the Bay City, tearing away all the pine
work and splitting the apron in a
large gash. Had the boats met in
glancing collision the Impact would
have been enough to send the Bay
City to the bottom.
With her forward rudder disabled
the Melrose had to swing around and
j head back to the creek. The Bay City
i was reported to be taking water.
A large amount of wreckage was
strewn on the bay attracting the at
tention of the ferry captains passing
later who stopped to hunt for a dis
abled vessel. More than three-quarters
of an hour was taken up by the usual
10 minutes run up the estuary to the
shipyards. Both steamers will be re
paired In time to resume service this
morning.
UNWRITTEN LAW WILL
BE PLEA OF MOTHER
Oklahoma Woman Who Killed Married
Man Who Eloped With Daugh.
ter Justifies Deed
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
TULSA, Okla., Jan. 26.—Mrs. Olla Biz
zell, wife of Lee Bizzell, a farmer living
near Tulsa, will plead the unwritten
law for shooting and killing John Good
speed last night. Goodspeed, although
having a wife and several children,
eloped with Esther Bizzell, the 20 year
old daughter of Mrs. Bizzell. They were
caught in Montana and brought back to
Oklahoma. Goodspeed visited the Biz
zell home again. While insisting on
seeing the girl, Mrs. Bizzell killed him.
Both Bizzell and his wife ran for the
shotgun, but she reached it first.
MRS. HERMAN OELRICHS
LEAVES FOR EAST TODAY
Society Leader's Visit Was for Purpose
of Supervising Removal of Par
ents' Tomb to Holy Cross
Mrs. Herman Oelrichs will leave to
morrow for her home in New York
after a week's stay at the Palace.
Mrs. Oelrich's visit was for the pur
pose of supervising the removal of her
parents' tomb from Mount Calvary to
Holy Cross cemetery.
Mrs. Oelrichs will join her son at her
New York residence at Fifth avenue
and Fifty-seventh street to spend the
remainder of the season.
SUCCESSOR TO TISDALE
Governor Appoints Charles B. Plnkbam
to State Health Board
Governor Johnson appointed Charles
B. Pinkham of San Francisco yester
day to be a member of the state board
of health, vice Charles S. Tisda.e, re
signed.
SAN FRANCISCO, MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 1913.
AVIATOR PLUNGES
WITH HYDROPLANE
INTO LIMPID LAKE
Hundreds of Spectators See
San Francisco Inventor
Dive 75 Feet Through
Air Lanes
WATER CLOSES OVER
BIRDMAIj AND CRAFT
J Lt -
Pilot Escapes Death, But
His Novel Machine Is
Complete Wreck
(Spee'al Dispatch to The Call) |
OAKLAND, Jan. 28.—C. IT. Paterson j
of San Francisco, at the wheel of a !
novel mono-hydroplane which 'he ' was
demonstrating, fell 75 feet this after
noon v and landed *In Lake Merritt 20
feet from land. , '.
The hundreds of spectators who wit
nessed J the spectacular plunge down t the 1
air • lanes believed that faterson had i
been killed, but ho disentangled him
self from the wrecked machine and in
I
Continued on Page 2, Column 2
ONE DIES, THREE HURT,
WHEN AUTO PLUNGES
TO BOTTOM OF GULLY
Mrs. W. D. Smith Loses Her
Life in Accident to
Husband's Car
OAKLAND, Jan. 26.—An automobile
pleasure trip terminated fatally this
afternoon when a party of motorists
plunged over a steep bank at the
Bulmer hill, eight miles east of Hay
ward. Mrs. TV. D. Smith of 1734 Grove
street, Berkeley, was instantly killed,
and her husband W. D. Smith, who was
driving, Byron Smith, his brother, and
a friend, Mrs. A. Gall, 1284 One Hun
dred and Thirty-seventh avenue, Elm
hurst, were injured.
Mrs. Smith was pinned beneath the
heavy machine and her neck was
broken. She died instantly. Young
Byron Smith was taken to the Hay
ward hospital, where he was treated
for minor bruises. Smith and Mrs.
Gall, suffering from cuts and severe
bruises, were taken In a machine to
Oakland. The body of Mrs. Smith was
removed to Pleasanton by Deputy Coro
ner Charles Graham.
The party reached the Bulmer hill
at 1:45 o'clock. The road at the hill is
very narrow and the embankment
step. It Is not known what caused the
accident, but the wheels of the car
slipped over the edge of the bank and
it plunged to the bottom of the gully.
DUKE TO MARRY ACTRESS
Elopement Threatens New Mesalliance
in Russian Imperial House
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
BERLIN, Jan. 26. —A new mesalliance
is threatened in the imperial house of
Russia. The Grand Duke Andreas
Viadimlrovich. youngest son of the
Grand Duke Vladimir, has left Russia,
accompanied by the Ballerina Marie Ke
rischa Inskaya of the Imperial theater,
a celebrated beauty, in order to marry
her abroad.
FRANCE WARNED OF SPIES
PARIS, Jan. 26.—Guards haVe been
doubled all along the eastern frontier of
France and they patrol with rifles
loaded and bayonets fixed. Secret in
formation has been received that a body
of German spies has been organized to
steal certain papers relating to France's
preparations for possible war with Ger
man^,
"An Independent Newspaper"
Mackinaw Strikes Breakwater!
Ship Has Miraculous Escape
Captain Robert Dollar, head of the Dollar Steamship company, and his
daughter, Mrs. Grace Dollar Dickson, who were aboard Mackinaw
when she narrowly missed destruction.
EVERY GULL ON BAY
HAS NAME OF ITS OWN
SAYS CAPTAIN JOHNSON
Fifty of These Birds Have
Been Known Personally
by Tugboat Skipper
Which city, San Francisco or Oak
land, should claim the flying popu
lation which travels across the bay
between the cities?
According to accurate figures which
have been compiled by Captain Harry
Johnson, well known tow boat and
launch owner, there are 20,000 sea
gulls making their homes and living
about the ships of the bay. Mr. John
son, who has made a study for years !
of these birds, says that the birds are
divided into three classes—the ferry
boat followers, the deep water travel
ers and the dock dwellers.
"Every bird has a name, Is my be
lief," said Captain Johnson. "I know
50 birds by name myself. Two of these
I know have resided on the Folsom
street dock for 20 years."
CHURCHES GO VISITING
Two-tblrds of Willmette Asks Other
Third to Affiliate
CHICAGO, Jan. 26.—Delegates repre
senting two-thirds of the population
of Willmette, a suburb of Chicago,
visited today the remaining third of
the inhabitants who have no church
affiliations, in an effort to induce each
family to ally itself with some church
organization.
It is estimated that 1,500 families
were visited.
The canvaas was conducted by a
central bo<|y consisting of the Episco
pal, Congregational, Roman Catholic,
Methodist and Presbyterian churches
of the village.
MALADY STRIKES EXPERT
Sacramento Appendicitis Specialist Near
Death With That Disease
(Special Dispatch to The Cain
SACRAMENTO, Jan. 20.—Dr. John L«
White, surgeon, proprietor of the
White sanatorium here, is in precarious
condition at the hospital tonight, fol
lowing an operation yesterday for ap
pendicitis. Doctor White, himself a
specialist in appendicitis, fell a victim j
to the disease. Gangrene was found
in the wound and his life is des
paired of. '
MACKINAW HITS
BREAKWATER AND
DRIFTS SEAWARD
I Steamship's Passengers and
Crew Take to Lifeboats;
Tugs Tow Ship
Into Harbor
(Special Dispatch to The Cain
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 26.—The steamer
Mackinaw, which left San Pedro harbor
at 7 o'clock tonight, is now tied to a
wharf in the inner harbor with a hole
in her starboard bow. That the vessel
was saved is little short of miraculous.
The steamer, commanded by Captain
Johnson, left the harbor in charge of
Port Pilot Krog.
After the pilot left her the navigators
evidently lost their bearings In the
heavy fog which prevailed and ran into
the breakwater, 6toving a hole into the
bow. Engines were stopped and the
helpless vessel drifted out to sea.
Lifeboats were sent to take off the
crew and passengers, and when the last
were rescued the vessel was three miles
out and in great danger of sinking.
Thirty-one persons were taken from
the distressed vessel, including Robert
Dollar and his daughter, Mrs. Grace
Dollar Dickson.
The tugs Listo and Scandal were sent
out to aid the vessel, and after con
siderable effort the steamer was towed
into the still waters of the inner har
bor, where repairs will be made before
the journey can be completed.
WOMEN URGE ORIGINAL
MOTHERS' PENSION BILL
San Jose Petitions to Follow Miss
Todd's Warning Committee Is
Chopping Measure
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
SAN JOSE, Jan. 26.—Appealing to
women to stand together in protest
against the emasculation of the
mothers' pension bill in the legisla
ture's committee. Miss Helen Todd, set
tlement worker of San Francisco, ad
dressed a large gathering of women at
the Unitarian church today. The meas
ure originally provided for state aid to
mothers of 5.500 half orphans now
being cared for in state institutions Ir
respective of whether the mothers were
vridows, abandoned wives or unmar
ried. Miss Todd said the legislature is
dubious about the wisdom of such revo
lutionary legislation and is consider
ing the advisability of cutting off state
help for unmarried mothers and
abandoned wives. Local club women
are planning to deluge legislators with
petitions favoring the original plan
embodied in the measure.
MISS MARLOWE POISONED
Actress Stricken in St. Louis; Under- !
study WUI Play Part
ST. LOUIS, Jan. 26.—Miss Julia Mar- i
lowe, who is playing with L. 11. i
Sothern in Shakespearean repertory, ;
was stricken with ptomaine poisoning'
Friday night, but, although ill, full- 1
filled her engagements in this city, i
Physicians Insisted today that s!<e be j
confined until fully recovered. An un
derstudy will play her part I
MKATHEB FORECAST:
Fair: Hsht aortbeawt wind.
A 1 cattle buyer want- position; wMI buy on cotn
mlKplna or'salary: reaiiy to *o utir p!«cc. WM.
WANTED Something in tbe line of furniture or
bedding In oxchanp'-- far a blgh rlas? Rurycle
SEE CLASSIFIED PAGES FOR CONTINUATION
OF THESE ADVERTISEMENT'
PRICE FIVE CENTST
BALKAN ALLIES
TEMPORIZE IN
SERVING TURKS
FINAL DEMAND
Policy of Envoys to Gain
Time Patent, for Delegates
Realize That Even Partial
Reverse on Field of Battle
Would Have Grave Moral
and Material Results, Be
sides the Loss of Thou
sands of Fighting Men of
the Armies of the Allies
PEACE CONFERENCE
IS CONSIDERED OFF
General Lines Laid Down
on Which Note Is to Be
Drafted, Comprising Ar
guments Why League De
mands Surrender of Adri
anople and Aegean Isles
as Indispensable Condi
tion to Ending of War;
Roumania Is Considered
LONDON, Jan. 26.—The Balkan plen
ipotentiaries, who have received full
powers from their respective govern
ments, appointed a committee today
to draft a note to the Turkish pleni
potentiaries explaining why the peace
conference must now be considered
broken off. It is hoped that the draft
will be ready for approval by th« full
delegation Monday night.
This action of the allies is part of
j a series of well considered forms o f
j pressure with which the Balkan dele-
Sfttffs hope to obtain their object-with
out resuming the war.
TEMPORIZING POLICY WINS
The meeting today lasted for an
hour and a half, and the course to be
followed was given earnest considera
tion. Two distinct views were mani
fested—one for the immediate rupture
of the negotiations, leading to a re
sumption of the war, and the other
favoring a temporizing policy, in order
to avoid irrevocable steps.
The latter course triumphed, and a
committee was appointed, consisting
of one member from each delegation,
as follows: Michael Madjaroff, Bul
garian minister at London; Professor
Georgles Strelt, Greek minister to Aus
tria-Hungary; Count Voynovitch, chief
of King Nicholas' cabinet, represent
ing Montenegro, and Doctor M. R.
Vesnitch, Servian minister to France,
with the addition of M. Politis of the
Greek delegation, owing to his knowl
edge of French and his thorough ac
quaintance with international law.
General lines were laid down on
which the note is to bo drafted, com
prising the arguments set forth many
times as to why the league demands
the surrender of Adrianople and the
Aegean islands as an indispensable
condition to the conclusion of peace.
SEIJK TO GAIN TIME
That the policy of the allies Is to
gain time is patent, and does not de
ceive anybody. The delegates de
cided thattthe advantages to be de
rived from the resumption of hostili
ties would be In proportion to the
risks they ran, and that they would
not take the step unless absolutely
forced to do so. It is realized that
even a partial reverse would have
3frave moral and material conse
quences, apart from the loss of thou
sands of men.
In addition, the fact is not over
looked that there is danger of Rou
mania advancing from the rear and of
Austria imposing on Servla and Mon
tenegro her conditions for remaining
neutral. The only disadvantage In de
laying decisive action is in keeping
large armies inactive and on a war
footing for so long a time, thus heavily
taxing both the financial and agricul
tural resources of tho country.
Foreign Minister Found
CONSTANTINOPLE. Jan. 26.—Hakk;
I ROYAL I
NESTOR
Original London & Cairo
Cigarettes-]
JEow,Wai.r Co.
v <&rjsr/r/&u rests,
161 167 CALIFORNIA ST.

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