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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 28, 1913, Image 1

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The demand for The New Call's 6A. M. edition is increasing. It has been a winne* from the start
Hi-heitt Tempernture Yesterday. «!*_* I,ii«f»t Sunday
Aiaht. 46. For details of the Weather are pane 13.
San Francisco Has
The largest military reservation within
city limits in the United States. : :
AREA, 1,542 ACRES.
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 59.
LEGISLATORS AND
STATE OFFICIALS
ENJOY BIG FEAST
Citizens of Sacramento For
mally Welcome Law
Makers to Hospitable and
Beautiful Capital City at
Lavish Banquet, Unique in
Novel Conception and Its
Many Informal Features
BRILLIANT SPEECHES
ENLIVEN DINNER
Governor Johnson, Respond
ing to Toast, Pays Tribute
to California and Praises
Legislature for Splendid
Work That Is Being
Done for Progress, Better
Social Condition and
an Honest Government
GEORGE A. VAN SMITH
CALL BTJREATr,
SACRAMENTO HOTEL.
Sacramento, January 27.
The citizens of Sacramento extended
the, neighbor's hand to the members of
the legislature and the state officials
at a welcoming dinner commemorative
of a new relationship between the peo
ple of the capital city and the state's
lawmakers.
The, dinner served in the main din
ing room of Hotel Sacramento, was a
feast in which the hosts and Manager
Hanlon of , the hostelry might well
take pride.
Nearly 4 n o men participated in an
affair as spontaneously cordial as it
was informal and novel for the men
who have served only % one or two prior
terms in the legislature.
That it was appreciated by the legis
was evidenced by the warmth
of their thanks and the wealth of their
promises to Sacramento and the peo
ple of the state.
MANY PROMINENT SPEAKERS
The speakers were Governor Hiram
TV. Johnson, Justice A. G. Burnett
t of the district court of
appeals, "Lieutenant Governor A. J. "Wal
lace. Speaker C. C. Young of the as
sembly, President (pro tern.) A. E.
Roynton of the senate, Assemblyman W.
A. Sutherland of Fresno, Senator George
W. Cartright of Fresno, Assemblyman
C. "William White of "Weaverville. Em
met Phillips. John G. Skelton. M. J.
Burke, D. "W. Carmichael and George
W. Peltier of Sacramento; State Treas
urer E. D. Roberts, Comptroller A. B.
Nye, Surveyor General W. S. Kingsbury,
Senator Lee C. Gates of Los Angeles
and Secretary of State Frank C. Jordan.
Justice Burnett was a most happy
tnastmaster. His pleasant eyes and
eloquence were thrown into striking
relief by the vociferous activities of the
Sacramento Ad club, whose members
had a chorus greeting for every speak
er, a list of catchy songs for every
pause and a merry hit for every local
celebrity.
The club occupied a table in the
center of the effectively decorated ban
o.uet room. That occupancy, however,
was not permitted until tlie club had
submitted to a rigorous examination
by <*. Glen Andrus, secretary of the
Chamber of Commerce.
« H\NT FOR GOVERNOR JOHNSON
The examination was designed to
enable the "ad" men to speak many
glowing words for Sacramento and a
few for themselves. The efforts of the
"ad** men may be fairly judged by
" isant. with which they greeted
Governor Johnson:
How de do, HI, bow de do?
How de do, Hiram, how de do?
The gang's all here to pay its
r.espei:til to yoii:
Governor Johnson was given a tre
mendous ovation when lie rose to re
spond to the toast, "California." No
legislature in recent years has been so
warmly and genuinely praised by ex
ecutive or any other state officer as
was the sitting legislature tonight by
Governor Johnson.
'I can not, in this city." said the
governor, "indulge in that fancy which
men In public office are supposed to be
so familiar with. I can not talk to
you of the glories of the state of Cali
fornia. You have the government of
California here before you. In these
men you have California with you.
LEGISLATORS ARE PATRIOTIC
"You well may be proud of the legis
lature that is here with you tonight.
There is no room for the disregard in
which legislatures were held here when
1 was a boy.
"The legislature sitting here today is
composed of patriotic gentlemen any
one may be proud to know. They are
striving for the benefit of you and
California. They are an honor to Cali
fornia and to any community in which
they temporarily may reside.
"They represent—they are—the gov
ernment that is going forward for Cali
f-4' ia. They are working for Cali
fornia's • achievement —for California's
advancement."
in conclusion, the po\ernor told how
i Continued on Page 3, Column 1
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
"The People's Newspaper" \
HIGH COST AND DENTIST'S
BILL TOO MUCH FOR RICH
Miss Guggenheim, Heiress to Smelter King, Who
Fell From Horse and Lest Teeth Refuses
To Pay $7,500 Repairs
(Spei-lal Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK, Jan. 27. —A dentist's
bill of $7,500, said to have been run up
by Miss Marguerite Guggenheim,
daughter of the late Benjamin Guggen
heim, one of the famous Guggenheim
brothers, has come up for a.iudication
in the courts.
Miss Guggenheim had a most unfor
tunate tumble from her saddle horse
whftf taking her morning canter
through Central park in April. 1911.
Her features were severely lacerated
and Dr. Asher F. F. Buxbaum was
called In to do the necessary dental
work to reinforce Miss Guggenheim's
physiognomy.
The dentist declares he has duly pre
sented his hill of $7,500 and has been
refused -payment. Hence he is suing
to recover that sum in the supreme
court from the executors of Guggen
heim's estate.
Buxbaum declares he treated Miss
Guggenheim both at his Madison
avenue office and in the suite occupied
by Miss Guggenheim and her mother at
WIDOW OF SICKLES'
CIVIL WAR FOE IS
TO AID GENERAL
"I'll Raise $23,476 Among
Ragged and Maimed Fol
lowers of Lee," Mrs.
Longstreet Wires
NEW YORK, Jan. 27.—Mrs. Helen D.
Longstreet, widow of the famous con-,
federate general, came to the aid of her
husband's civil war foe. General Daniel
E. Sickles, today with an offer to raise
$23,476 among the "ragged and maimed
followers of Lee"' to pay General
Sickles* alleged debt to the state of New
York.
Her telegram was as follows:
"My soul is sorrowed by your troub
les. I am wiring the attorney general
of New York that I will raise money
among the ragged, destitute and
maimed veterans who followed" Lee to
pay the amount demanded, if the New
York officials will allow sufficient time.
The republic whose battles you fought
will not permit your degradation.
"HELEN D. LONGSTREET."
Sheriff Harburger, who arrested Gen
eral Sickles in the civil suit brought by
the state to recover the money, also
indited a letter to many of the richest
men in New York asking them to aid
the aged veteran.
The sheriff addressed his letter to J.
P. Morgan, John D. Rockefeller. An
drew Carnegie and the 450 members of
the sheriff's panel, composed of wealthy
New Yorkers.
Sheriff Harburger dealt gently with
his prisoner. Instead of serving the
order of arrest this morning, he waited
until General Sickles' lawyer, Daniel
P. Hays, had arranged with a surety
company for a $30,000 bond for the
veterans freedom. Mr. Hays brought
it to the sheriff's offlce and they went
to General Sickles' Fifth avenue home
this afternoon.
They placed the bond before the
general and he signed it in a flowing
hand.
Mrs. Longstreet Ready to Aid
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
GAINESVILLE, Ga., Jan. 27.—Follow
ing the publication today of her tele
grams to General Daniel E. Sickles in
New York and the attorney general In
Albany. Mr?. Helen D. Longstreet said:
'My husband always spoke of General
Sickles as the hero of Gettys
burg. They were opposed to each
other in that deciding battle of
the war and General Longstreet
in the last autograph letter he
ever wrote, September 19, 1902, to Gen
eral Sickles, told him that the taking
of the peach orchard by Sickles' corps
won the battle for the union forces
and defeated the confederacy.
"They were always close friends, and
General Sickles wrote the introduction
to my biography of General Longstreet.
It was General Longstreet's detach
ment that shot off the leg of the brave
union general, but as General Long
street said, 'Sickles can wtll afford
to leave a leg at Gettysburg, for he
had made sure his place forever in the
hearts of Americans."
"I have made no plans as yet. but if
Gener.il Sickles needs my aid _i.d the
aid of the south, he will get it."
POLITICIAN SLAIN IN ROW
CYNTHIANA, Ky., Jan. 27.—Harry I_
Bailey, republican nominee for con
gress from the ninth district of Ken
tucky in the last election, was shot
and killed here today by Newton Ar
nold, also of Cynthlana. Bailey was a
newspaper man. The killing is said to
have arisen over a business deal.
SAN FRANCISCO, TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 8.
the hotel St. Regis, when they are in
town.
Follows a list of some of the things
which the doctor says he did to restore
the young woman's pulchritude and
which, he says, should cost her $7,500.
Replanted the teeth in the upper j
jaw.
Made gold splints for both jaws; |
aided Dr. Cauldwell in taking an
X-ray photograph.
Hammered the fractured portion of
the lower jaw Into position and set
it by a splint, after Miss Guggenheim
had been anesthesized.
Made it possible for Miss Guggen
heim to eat, by making impressions
of the upper right and left sides of
the Jaw and reproducing the upper
teeth in gold and platinum and then
kept the mouth open so that the re
planted teeth and the fracture would
be at rest and a perfect reunion would
result.
Recemented the upper splints, ul-
The executors of the Guggenheim
estate deny Dr. Buxbaum is entitled
to any such fee as $7,500.
CRUISER SMASHED;
CAPTAIN IS UNABLE
TO EXPLAIN CRASH
Warship California in Dry
dock Shows Plates Bat
tered, Frames Buckled
and Ruined
(Special n"*ra'>b to The Cain
MARE ISLAND, Jan. 27.—The cruiser
California lies in the drydock here
with battered plates and buckled
frames and no explanation of the cir-
cumstances attending the disaster can
be given by captain, officers or crew.
How the ship's side could be crushed
in without the seeming knowledge of
the officers in command is a matter
that will receive the attention of a
naval board of inquiry and later the
serious consideration of the navy de
partment. «
When the cruiser was examined to
day by officers and mechanics it was
discovered that plates covering a dis
tance of 175 feet on the port side were
crushed in and would have to be re
placed. The damaged plates are just
below the armor belt of the vessel.
CAPTAIN SILENT ON ACCIDENT
The Interior of the ship also looked
as if a battering ram had struck it
and 25 frames were pulled out In a
crushed condition. The vessel went
on drydock Saturday, but the revela
tions of its crippled condition were not
made to Commander H. T. Mayo until
today. He immediately ordered an in
vestigation.
Captain Alexander Halstead seems
unable to explain how the damage was
done his ship. Men expert ill tfaval
affairs say that only a blow that would
have rocked the ship from stem to
stern could have wrought such havoc,
yet everybody aboard ship professes
ignorance of any collision or accident.
The California has not been In ( dry
dock for nearly a year, and It was sug
gested that the accident might have
happened before the ship left San
Francisco last spring.
COURT MARTIAL LIKELY
It was also stated that the plates
might have been battered in when the
ship was at Corinto last fall. But
these are only surmises. The truth
will likely not be learned until a full
investigation is made by the navy in
quiry board.
ANCIENT PAIR WOULD WED
She Is Blushing Woman of 105; He
Merry Young Grig of 80 Years
LOS ANGELES, Jan. 27.—Pleasant!nto
Leon, the 80 year old fiance of Mrs-. M.
Elisalda, 105 years old, who is seeking
to have vacated the court order ap
pointing Mrs. Claudio Lugo her guar
dian on the ground that proper testi
mony as to her sanity had not been
introduced, was in court today with his
attorney. The result of their visit was
that the hearing of the motion to va
cate Judge Rives' order will not be
heard until next Monday. The hearing
of the motion will mark the actual
legal beginning of the struggle of Leon
to win Mrs-. Elisalda and her fortune of
176,000.
"CHILD" IS 45 YEARS OLD
CHICAGO, Jan. 27.—A petition to
adopt a "child about 45 years old" was
presented to Judge McKinley in the su
perior court today by Mrs. Martha Col
lins, 65" years old. In her application
she set forth that she desired to adopt
Miss Eliza Robinson, who has lived
with her 40 years, to make her the
legal heir to a large estate. Judge
McKinley took the request under ad
visement. — *--^____
LUMBER BOYCOTT
IS CONDEMNED BY
COMMERCIAL MEN
Chamber Passes Resolution
Declaring if One Exists It
Can Not Be De
fended by City
FREE EXCHANGE OF
PRODUCTS OF STATES
Officers Instructed to Take
Steps to Reirjove Restric
tions if Any : There Be
A boycott against northern lumber
by local commercial interests, if such
has existed, was strongly condemned
by the San Francisco Chamber of Com
merce yesterday in unanimous resolu
tions by the hoard of directors and
presented to the representatives of the
northern chambers of commerce who
made protest Saturday against the al
leged discrimination at the meeting of
the Associated Chambers of Commerce
of the Pacific Coast.
These resolutions announce opposi
tion to any action that will interfere
with free exchange between the states
of their products, both raw and manu
factured, and instruct the proper offi
cers to take steps to remove these re
strictions.
In addition. President P. IT. McCarthy
of the San Francisco Building Trades
council told the northern men that he
would send them a written statement
denying the existence of the boycott,
and declaring that if one existed it
should be removed. I
This in suhstancJ forms the action
Continued on Vmzr 2, « nlumu 5
WIFE TRADES HER
HUSBAND FOR $80
Induces Spouse IVed Younger
Woman That She May Re
turn to Russia on Dowry
NEW YORK, Jan. 27.—When his wife
became homesick four years ago, Paul
Steinberg, with her consent, married
a younger woman and used the $80
dowry she brought him to send his
first wife back to Russia. This was the
story Steinberg told today when ar
raigned In court on a bigamy charge.
Their plan promised well until the
first Mrs. Steinberg decided to return
to New York. Here she had trouble
supporting five children and sought
aid from the father. Steinberg grew
tired of this and stopped payments.
Then his first wife had him arrested.
The court thought Steinberg's story so
unusual that sentence was postponed
to permit further Investigation.
STRATTON AND NEEDHAM
SUGGESTED FOR VACANCY
Speculation In Washington as to Suc
cessor on Federal Bench Follows
Death of Judge de Haven
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WASHINGTON. Jan. 27.—The death
of Judge de Haven has caused specu
lation in Washington as to his suc
cessor.
It is reported that Senator Perkins
favors the nomination of F. S. Strat
ton, at present collector of the port at
San Francisco. Congressman Need ham,
whose term expires March 4, also Is
mentioned.
The deadlock In the senate regarding
presidential nominations may defeat
any plan to appoint a republican to this
vacancy.
There is a courtesy rule in congress
Whereby the naming of a congressman
for an important office is usually con
fit mcd. This might stand Needham in
good stead if the two senators should
join in recommending him.
DEER STARVED BY SNOW
Heavy Fall Expected to Kill Hundreds
In California Mountains
MONTAGUE. Jan. 27.—Heavy snow
of the last few days probably has killed
hundreds of deer in the mountains. In
the last day or two many deer have
come into the smaller valleys about
Montague. At the Ward ranch near
Klamath Hot Springs a band of 20
comes daily for feed. It Is believed
hundreds will starve before they can
get out of the higher altitudes.
FALL FROM PLANE FATAL
German Flyer. Trying to Avoid Wire.,
Pitches Out ok Scat
AIX LA CHAPELLE, Rhenish Prus
sia, Jan. 27. —The German aviator Huell
was killed this afternoon while mak
ing a flight. He elevated his planes
suddenly to avoid telegraph wires and
fell from his seat 30 test to the ground.
ARCHDUKE RANIER DIES
Second Coosln of Emperor Francis Jo-
sepb Succumbs In 87th Year
VIENNA, Austria, Jan. 27.—Arch
duke Ranler, second cousin of Emperor
Francis Joseph, died today in his 87th
year, i . ." . —. . __— _^
"An Independent Newspaper"
Rich Boy Not Pampered
Will Be a "Man's Man"
Hundred million dollar baby and his mother in push chair at Palm beach
Vinson Walsh McLean, $ 100,000,000 Baby,
Is Reared to Depend Upon Himself Solely
(Special Dimpatf-h to The Cal!)
PALM BEACH, Fla., Jan. 27.—Master
Vinson Walsh McLean, the $100,000,000
baby, is being raised by his parents to
be a "man's man"; no woman petted
milksop or mother's boy. The only
woman the youngster comes In con
tact with is his mother.
Most of the society women here pro
vide their pet poodles with a maid
apiece. No apron strings for Master
Mcl^ean.
"A man's man he shall be," his father
told friends of the family this week,
and the boy's mother smiled approv
ingly.
- And a manly youngster is little Mc-
Lean of the big bank roll.
Vinson has a retinue of five high
priced men who devote themselves to
his attention. Three are detectives,
one of whom never leaves him for a.
LOST: ELECTORAL VOTE
OF ARIZONA AND MAN
INTRUSTED WITH IT
Wires Sing in Hunt for
Phoenix Messenger, but
It's Too Late Now
Jan. 27. —Lost: The
electoral vote of Arizona and its bear
er. Finder please send at once to the
offlce of the vice president of the
United States.
Senators and representatives of the
baby state of Arizona sent broadcast
tonight the foregoing notice when at
6 o'clock, the time limit, had expired,
for receiving returns from the na
tional election last November, and Wil
fred- T. Webb, custodian of three per
fectly good votes for Woodrow Wil
son and Thomas R. Marshall, had
failed to appear at the vice presidents
office in the capitol.
Arizona's patriots and legislators
were much perplexed and disappointed
for. though no political upheaval
would be caused should the three lit
tle votes never be found, they did not
want missing from history's archives
Arizona's first vote for chief execu
tives of the nation.
WRESTLER'S NECK BROKEN
Auburn Man, Thrown to Ground. Dies
From His Injuries
AUBURN, Jan. 27. —Gus Paphilis,
while wrestling today with Gus Lalos,
was thrown to the ground and his
spine injured so that he died within a
few minutes. Doctor Fay of Auburn
declared the man's neck was broken,
although he walked to a car 200 feet
away after arising unassisted. Lalos
was arrested.
WEATHER FORECAST:
Fair, foe In mornlns; light >• wind ehan„lnjr to \V.
MOVING picture operator. married, reliable, don't
drink. 11 years' experience on all make* of
WILL trade a (rood Palsy gas hath beater, u«ed
hut a short time, for "dozen lajln* hens. Box
SEE CLASSIFIED PAGES FOR CONTINUATION
OF THESE ADVERTISEMENTS
moment; one is a private physician,
who, besides taking general precau
tions for his health, makes a special
examination of all the food set before
the child, and the fifth is a man nurse.
The boy's mother discourages any at
tempt on the part of -women friends
to "make a pet" of Vinson. His maid
is under strict instructions not to leave
the millionaire baby alone. '
Young Vinson, in whom when he
comes of age, the country is likely to
take as great Interest as it did at the
twenty-first birthday recently of Vin
cent Astor, is a blue eyed, sandy haired
child, very grave for his age. His ap
pearance indicates much individuality.
He is not a cut-up.
The gold bathtub the king of Belgium
aye him when a baby has been rele-
Continued on Page -. Column 7
AS WOMEN SMOKE AND
DRINK HIGHBALLS THEY
ARE GIVEN JURY DUTY
Colorado Senate Passes Bill
After Moralists Are
Routed in Debate
DENVER. Jan. 27.—Senator Helen R.
Robinson's bill to amend the constitu
tion to permit the legislature to pass
a bill admitting women to jury duty
precipitated a heated quarrel of an
hour in the legislature today.
Senator Williams attacked the bill
on the ground of morality.
"I should hate to see the time come,"
he said, "when my wife or daughter
would be chosen for jury service and
be locked in a room with several men
jurors over night or for several nights.
"I should hate to see the time come
when my wife or my daughter were
forced to appear in court and show
cause why they should not serve on a
Jury.
"And there are many criminal cases
in the trial of which it is an Insult to
ask women to listen to the evidence."
Senator John Hecker of Denver re
plied in defense:
"Women have equal suffrage. If
they want to sit on juries I can't see
why they shouldn't. When the liquor
question was brought up in Denver it
was the women who voted the town
wet.
"The women of this town drink more
highballs and cocktails than the men
do, anyhow, and they smoke more
cigarettes a day than the men. I can't
see why they shouldn't be allowed to
serve on juries if they want to."
The bill was passed on second read
ing.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
WOMEN RAGE
WHEN THEIR
RIGHTS BILL
IS GARROTED
Militant Leaders of English
Suffragettes Summon Host
to Relentless Warfare,
When, by Alleged Trick of
Politicians, Equality Meas
ure Is Strangled in House
of Commons, and London
Becomes the Hotbed of
an Amazonic Rebellion
WHOLE POLICE FORCE
CALLED INTO ACTION
Mrs. Pankhurst and Other
Radical Spellbinders Ha
rangue crowds to Enlist
for Crusade, Threatening
to Destroy Property, and
if Necessary Break Heads
Until Parliament Gives
Them Voice in Govern
ment and Ballot Privilege
LONDON. Jan. 27.—England is on the
brink of another campaign by the suf
fragettes in comparison with which
former outbreaks of the militant
women will appear insignificant.
Two thousand policemen were en
gaged tonight In dispersing huge
crowds gathered near the parliament
buildings, shopkeepers were boarding
up show windows, and excited women
were making incendiary speeches in
several halls.
The women believe that the poll
tlleans have played a carefully studied
trick upon them and the decision of
the government to drop the franchise
bill is likely to lead to serious conse
quences.
SMOTHERING SUFFRAGE BILL
In the house of commons today, the
speaker, the Right Honorable James
William Lowther, in response to an
inquiry by the prime minister, an
nounced that if any amendments to
the franchise bill giving women the
vote should be adopted he would be
obliged to rule that they made it sub
stantially a new bill, which would corn
ped its withdrawal.
Mr. Asquith thereupon announced
that the cabinet had decided that
under such circumstances it would be
useless to proceed. This was an
nounced to a crowded house, which dis
played more Interest in the subject
than had been shown In the last
stages of the home rule bill.
POLICE GUARD AGAINST RIOTS
In the meantime police in great num
bers, mounted and afoot, were having
great difficulty outside the buildings
keeping the crowds in check, while re
serve forces stationed In courtyards in
the vicinity of parliament were held
in readiness to quell disorders of a
more serious nature.
The suffragettes held heated meet
ings tonight. Mrs. Emaline Pankhurst
and other leaders denounced both the
enemies and supporters of suffrage In
the cabinet for their treachery.
They declare an end of the truce
which the women had observed while
awaiting parliament's action on the
bill.
SEVERAL WOMEN ARRESTED
Several woman were arrested tonight,
some of whom declined to give their
names.
One, believed to be Miss Sylvia Pank
hurst, was captured in St. Stephen's
hall, leading to the house of commons,
where she was making a determined
attack on a large painting
The police dispersed a .rowd in Tra
falgar square, where a man and woman
were trying to make speeches. The
speakers, who resisted, were arrested.
The noted militant, Mrs. Despard.
was taken to the police station with
six others.
"Deeds, not words," was the motto
displayed above the platform where
YOU PAY NO MORE
for the new
automatic Vm A __,-—*n
adjusting glass \*
than the old \r %fajpi&*
style and \janw^
uncomfortable
kind". We con- __•"■*«*_
sidcr the Equipoise crtW§jov
eye glass the best ( mSfc
thumb and finger It t-i-rfci
eye glass ever made. \l m
You will, too, if you \W if
Wear Equipoise >«✓
California Optical Co*
(W.D.Fennimore J.W.Darls A.R.Fennlmore)
181 Post St San Franciaco
1221 Broadway ...*... Oakland
{<_'. te. Hogno at Oakland Store.) f

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