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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 29, 1913, Image 1

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The demand for The New Call's 6A. M. edition is increasing. It has been a winner from the start
HlsrlMut Temperature Yeaferilny, BO: Lowest Mond
Mght, 40. For detail* of the Weather .«»«■ page
San Francisco Has
32 PARKS AND SQUARES OF 1,398.6
ACRES—4.7 PER CENT OF THE
CITY'S TOTAL AREA
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 60.
RIPARIAN BILL TO
BLOCK NEVADA'S
GRABBING PLAN
Senate Measure No. 412
Takes Advantage of Sav
ing Clause in Famous U. S.
Supreme Court Decision
Apparently Delivering
Ranchmen to Neighbors
*SHOE PUT ON OTHER
FOOT CAUSES HOWL
Sagebrush State Tribunals
Will Try All Cases—But
Under California Laws —
and These Will Give a
Square Deal to Agricul
turists of Sierra Districts
Virulent attacks on California and
Callfornlans in Nevada newspapers and
by speakers at mass meetings during
the last week have been included in
objections directed at the bill intro
duced in the senate of this state aimed
at preserving to California ranchmen
the rights over interstate streams
which they have enjoyed these many
years.
In this staJss the bill has escaped
notice, having been quietly passed on
to the judiciary committee of the sen
ate with no comment on the fact that
it meant more millions to the state
than the entire bulk of legislation in
troduced at an ordinary session.
Users of water on the California side
of the line have accused their Nevada
neighbors of entering into a con
spiracy to rob them of the water rights
they have used ever since the state was
settled. An ingenious sophism, they
say, induced the supreme court of the
United States to fall in with the
Nevadans' plan. In a decision that
seemed to place the California ranch
ers at the mercy of Nevada, that court
that every dispute between Cali
fornia and Nevada riparian owners
must be tried by the Nevada courts.
SAVING CLAUSE DISCOVERED
It is now recalled, under the changed
aspect of the case, that the sagebrush
ers were jubilant over this decision
and predicted that there would be no
uncertainty as to the ownership of
the water that rises in California and
flows into Nevada. At that time, it is
related, Nevadans said the California
ranchers would have to move off the
land where their homes had been
reared because the supreme court's de
cision appeared to be that Nevada
could come across the state line and
forbid California to use their own
streams, if they happened to flow
across the line into Nevada.
Attorneys discovered, however, that
there was a saving clause in the fa
mous decision. The supreme court
ruled, indeed, that the courts of Ne
vada possessed jurisdiction, but that
the cases arising under this decision
must be tried under the laws of Cali
fornia.
REMEDY _______ MATTER
It then became a mere matter of
passing laws to assure to California
the ownership of Its streams. And
now the bar of the state is laughing
at the fury of Nevada over the reversal
of the situation In case the law in
question is enacted. The measure
which is expected to save the state of
California, untold millions, and which
is the target of the denunciations from
across the line, is senate bill No. 412,
entitled:
"An act to amend the civil code of
the state of California by adding a
new section thereto to be numbered
dfcWa, relating to the water of all
n_t_ral streams carrying water from
the state of California into any other
state, and defining relative rights to
the waters of such streams."
The bill provides:
The entire flow of water in any
natural stream which carries water
from the state of California into
any other state is subject to use in
the state of California, under the
laws of the state of California, and
the right may be, so far as not al
ready acquired by use in the state
of California, acquired and held un
der the laws of the state of Cali
fornia. The rights to the use of
such water held under the laws of
the state of California shall be
prior and superior to any rights to
the waters of such streams held
under the laws of any other state.
CALIFORNIA II IS BEST OF IT
The situation is said to be unparal
leled in riparian litigation on account
of the peculiar situation of California
In this, that no stream arises in another
state and flows into California, Hence,
it is pointed out by experts in water
laws, there is no chance for any other
state to retaliate if California chooses
to avail herself of the permission of
the supreme court to lay down the
laws under which any case involving
Interstate streams must be tried.
James F. Peck, admitted to be the
foremost authority on western riparian
laws, said yesterday:
"The amazing situation created by
th"}! s ipreme court of the United States
relating to interstate streams would
appear to be met with neatness and
Continued on Page 2, Column 2
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
"77ie People's Newspaper"
THE CALL FIRST
ON GROUND IN
NEW MINE CAMP
r/re Ca/Z agency at the Rochester,
Nev., mining camp.
Agency Building in Roches
ter, Nev., Erected in a
Single Day
This is the reproduction of a photo
graph showing The Call's agency in the
new mining camp, Rochester, Nev. The
building, like several others in the
town, was put up in one day. The Call
printed the first extensive story of the
new camp a few days ago.
CONTRACT FOR THE NEW
SUBTREASURY AWARDED
Grant Fee of (ian Francisco Meets
Requirements of Department for
Modifications of Specifications
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 28.—Assistant
Secretary Allen of the treasury signed
the papers awarding the contract for
the construction of a new subtreasury
at San Francisco to Grant Fee of 2449
Sixteenth street, San Francisco, for
$384,300.
The contract is a compromise, Fee
having met the requirements of the de
partment for certain modifications of
specifications. _ There were 16 bidders,
of whom Fee was the lowest.
Work is expected to begin at once
upon the new building, which is to be
completed during 1914.
The California delegation has been
busy trying to push this matter along,
as it was feared that the building
would not be completed in time for the
exposition.
HITCHCOCK ORDERS ALL
MAIL WAGONS PAINTED
Red, Real Red, \<> Blends, Declares
Head of Fostal Service In De
manding Changes
(SpAcia! Dispatch to The Call)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 28.—Postmaster
General Hitchcock has issued orders to
employes of the postofflce department
to paint evei-ything red. Every de
livery wagon, city, parcel post and
rural free delivery vehicle must be red.
To try out the new color Mr. Hitch
cock ordered some of the Washington
city wagons painted red. The wagons,
wine colored, were taken to the post
offlce building for his inspection.
"Take them back and make them
red—red—without any sort of blend."
said the postmaster general.
WIFE SHOOTS HUSBAND
Son Halts Attack on Mother and She
Fires on Assailant
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
PLACERVILLE, Jan. 28. — John
James Starkey, a lumber jack, living
in Diamond Springs, tried to kill his
wife at their home last night and when
their 14 year old son interfered he at
tacked the boy with a bottle. Mrs.
Starkey then fired at her husband, the
bullet striking him under the right
eye. The woman left him apparently
dead and took her five young children
three-quarters of a mile to the home
of Louis Scheiber, who telephoned for
Sheriff Hand. Starkey's wound is not
serious. He was arrested.
MISS TAFT'S CLOSE CALL
Horse Ridden by Companion Killed In
Collision With Klectric Car
(Special Dtapatch to The Cell)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 28.—Miss Martha
Bowers, daughter of the late Solicitor
General Lloyd Bowers, while horseback
riding today with Miss Helen Taf£ was
seriously injured when her mount was
struck by a streetcar. Her horse was
killed. Miss Taft, who escaped injury,
aided in carrying her injured compan
ion to a physician's office.
SLIDE VICTIMS SMOTHER
Montana Miners Found Dead in Be.
Under 15 Feet of Snow
MISSOULA. Mont, Jan. 28.—Saarch
ers today found the bodies of David
Bogarth and Joseph Peterson, miners
at the copper* Age-Edison mine, five
miles from Saltese, victims of a snow
slide several days ago. The men were
in their bunks, evidently smothered
in their cabin which lay under fifteen
feet of snow.
BOY, 9, KILLS BROTHER, 12
Kansas Lade Play Indian With Tragic
Result
MULVANE, Kan.. Jan. 28.—While
playing Indians at their home here to
day, Neal Eck, 12 years old, was shot
and killed by his brother, Clyde Eck,
9. The boys were playing with a 22
caliber rifle.
SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1913.— PAGES 1 TO 8.
SAMOA GOES TO DESTRUCTION
Two Vessels Collide Off Point Bonita
Steamer Acme Does Not Re
spond to Helm and She
Strikes Fifield Out
side the Heads
BOTH ESCAPE WITH
NO SERIOUS DAMAGE
Southbound Voyage of Car
rier Marred by Death of
Girl Seeking Health
Caught In the strong currents out
side the heads, and failing to respond
to their masters' efforts to keep them
in a straight course, the lumber
schooner Fifield and the steamer Acme
collided off Point Bonito at 8 o'clock
last night without suffering any seri
ous damage.
The Fifield, Captain C. Schillinsky,
bound for this port from Bandon, Ore.,
with a cargo of lumber and six pas
sengers, sighted the Acme, under the
command of Captain G. Olson, just off
the point, outward bound. Each cap
tain responded to the other's signal,
but the Acme did not answer to the
helm. "When Captain Schillinsky saw
that a collision was inevitable he sig
naled to reverse engines and was going
full speed astern when the Acme swung
to, striking the Fifield a glancing blow.
Captain Olson, according to the crew
of the Fifield, called for a line, saying
a rope had become entangled with his
ship's propellor. A few minutes later
he announced that all was well, and
both ships headed for this port to re
port the accident.
Passengers on board the Fifield said
that the impact of the collision was
barely noticeable, and no excitement
was caused.
The Acme is owned by the A. W.
Beadle company, and was bound for
Eureka
The Fifield, which is owned by Est
abroak £ Co., was bound for this port
with a cargo of lumber and six pas
sengers.
The voyage to this port was marred
by the death on board of Miss Annie
Victoria Johnston, a 12 year old girl of
Bandon, Ore., who died of tuberculosis
when the ship was 15 miles off Rogue
river. She was on her way to southern
California and was accompanied by her
two brothers, James E. and Alfred C
Johnston. Upon the arrival of the
Fifield the body was removed to the
morgue.
ASHES OF CAPTAIN TO
BE SCATTERED ON SEA
Complying With Last Wishes, Cere
mony Will Take Place on Line
He Formerly Commanded
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 28.— When the
North German Lloyd liner Chemnitz
reaches this port in a day or so the
ashes of Captain Adolph Riebman, for
merly master of the steamship, will be
placed on board and on her outward
trip they will be scattered to the winds
in the middle of the Atlantic.
Captain Riebman died early in the
winter in Cincinnati and his body was
then cremated.
His widow and the company have
complied with his wishes to have his
ashes thus disposed of.
REVIVAL WORKERS HURT
Ksussas Volunteer Tabernacle Car-pen-
ters Burled in Collapse
ELDORADO, Kan., Jan. 28.—One hun
dred men who had volunteered to build
a tabernacle for a revival were buried
in broken timbers here this afternoon
when the roof collapsed. Fifteen were
injured, three probably fatally. Expert
carpenters had warned the volunteers
that they were overloading the roof.
Half an hour before the accident 25
women were at work, but they had
gone to prepare dinner for the work
men.
DIMPLES ALL THE RAGE
Parisian Specialists Bnsy Making Them
for Hound Faced Women
(Special Cable to The Call)
PARIS, Jan. 28.—Dimples are now all
the rage in Paris society, according to
the Figaro, and a number of specialists
are at work making them in cheeks
that are naturally too rounded.
Two kinds are supplied to order—
weekly d-.raples tfiat wrli last some six
or seven days and permanent dimples.
The former are preferred, as there is
no knowing how long the fashion will
last
HENRY PHIPPS, CAFE MAN
Jury Finds Steel Magnate Was Inter
ested In Pittsburg Resort
PITTSBURG. Jan. 28.—1n a verdict
today a Jury found Henry Phlpps,
steel magnate, had been interested in a
local cafe, the license of which was re
voked some time ago by the court.
The suit was brought against Phipps
and Paul N. Decrette as partners, by
creditors of the saloon. Phlpps de
nied his interests in affidavits and the
case was bitterly contested.
Lost in Fog, Lumber Steam
Schooner Piles Up on
the Rocky Coast of
Point Reyes
LIFE SAVERS WIN
BATTLE WITH SEA
Captain and Crew of the
Doomed Vessel Removed
by Breeches Buoy
Lost In the Impenetrable gloom of a
flense tog, the lumber schooner Samoa
struck on the rocky coast of .Point
Reyes at dawn of yesterday. But for
the speedy and heroic work of the
rescuing* force of the life saving station
there would have been added to the
loss of the ship and cargo the lives of
Captain Christopher Olsen and his
crew of 20 men. The disabled craft
now lies pounding on the stormgtrt
coast, a total loss. Th« men are safe
in the lighthouse and will be taken
to this city when the storm subsides
sufficiently to allow a rescuing ship to
approach.
It was shortly after 7 o'clock yes
terday morning that the life saving
station at Point Reyes was advised
that a vessel was in distress three
miles north of the point The Samoa
was not equipped with wireless, and
the only intimation of impending dig
aster given was the long, hoarse groan
ing of the ship's siren.
Captain Christopher Hunt of ths
Point Reyes station heard these crlaa
for aid and summoned his crew. They
put out in the dark, following eagerly
the siren's call, but were confused by
Continued on Page 2, Column 1
MED IN "10 SECONDS
FLAT,"SHE ASKS DECREE
FROM DARTMOUTH STAR
Former Miss Canfield, Wife
of College Sprinter, to
Sue for Divorce
(Sr*H»l DUpstrh to The Call)
NEW YORK. Jan. 28.—Mrs. Grace
Martin Hannon, daughter of Richard
Canfield, who when she was 16 years
old ran away with and married Martin
Edward Hannon, a Dartmouth athlete,
applied in the supreme court today for
the appointment of Richard P. Lyon as
her guardian pending the settlement of
a suit for divorce which she plans to
bring against her husband.
Canfleld's pretty daughter, though
married almost three years, is still a
minor in the eyes of the law, and she
can not bring divorce proceedings.
The story of the romance of Canfleld's
daughter and the boy who once held
the record for the flashiest raiment and
the wildest escapades of Dartmouth is
tuned to three speeds forward.
Gta.ee was en the eve of a trip to Eu
rope—a "finishing tour," whloh should
round out the careful education her
parents had given her —when the big
athlete from Dartmouth met her and
wooed her in "10 seconds flat."
ELKS' HOME DEDICATED
San Francisco Brothers Aid Grass Val
ley Affair
(Special Dlnpsfrti to The Csll)
GRASS VALLET, Jan. 28.—Richard
Belcher of Marysville, representing the
grand lodge B. P. O. Elks, dedicated
the new $40,000 home of the order in
Grass Valley tonight with Imposing
ceremonies. More than 400 Elks from
the bay region and northern California
were present i
"An Independent Newspaper"
Mrs. Abbie Krebs, president of the Caspar Lumber company, owner of
the Samoa, the wrecked steam schooner, and Captain Christopher J. Olsen, who
was saved with his crew.
TEN GIRLS GIVE
SKIN FOR CHILD
Kansas City Young Folk Bare
Arms to Save Farm Home
Fire Victim
KANSAS CITY, Jan. 28.—Ten > girls,
ranging in age from 8 to 16, bared
their arms to the surgeon's knife today
to furnish skin to heal the burns of
Reba Hainds, 10 years old, who nearly
perished Christmas day in a Are which
brought death to her father, mother
and baby sister and destroyed the
Hainds farm house near Arenett, Okla.
Skin from the arms of-10 more girls,
whs already have volunteered to fur
nish it, riiusi be applied before the I
operation is completed. Most of the
burns are on the face. Surgeons pro
nounced today's part of the operation
successful.
SHIPS CRASH; 26 DROWN
Only Four Saved When .Vessels Collide
La English Channel Fog
HAVRE, France, Jan. 28.—Twenty
six of the crew of the German bark
Panganie perished today when that
vessel was sunk by the French steamer
Phryne in the English channel. The
vessels collided in a fog and the Pan
ganie sank so rapidly that only four
of those aboard were saved. The
*_vrne was badly cUioared. I
WII4THEH FOBRriST!
F'alr; tule tott in morainß; Ilsbt eimt wind.
WANTED— Middle sired. respectable woman
housekeeper for young couple; no Tvnshinic. no
LOST —Brown cameo, ilinerra head, set in
chased srold pin.
For Continuation of These A_*rert!sements Se»
i Classified Pages
SIX ACES DEALT BY
CATTLEMAN ON LINER
IN GAME 'FOR BLOOD"
"Once This Would Have
Brought Forth Sixshoot
ers," Says Westerner
(Spwf»l Dispuf-rKi to The Csll)
NEW YORK, Jan. 29.—0n the At
lantic transport liner Minneapolis, which
arrived today from Southampton, was
played a game of poker, "for blood,"
and which in other days with some
players might have drawn blood. Four
of the passengers, all wealthy cattle
men, were Charles W. Hastings and
Jesse Hartbone of Butte, Mont; Fran
cis McDermott of Austin, Tex., and
Charles B. Curley of Kansas City, Mo.
With two other passengers, the four
were playing on Monday night. A new
deck bf cards was called for and it was
Hartbone's deal. He shuffled the cards,
passed them for the cut and dealt.
There had been a dollar limit on th*
game, but just before this hand wu
j played the limit had been taken off.
After the "draw" the two strangers
threw their hands into the discard and
the four cattlemen kept raising one an
other until there was close to $1,000
in the pot.
Hartbone laid down three kings and
a pair. McDermott had an ace high
straight, Curley three tens and a pair
of aces and Hastings three aces and a
pair of jacks.
Six aces on the table!
The four men looked intently at the !
four hands and then at one another, j
Then some one laughed.
"I've seen the time in Montana," said
Mr. Hastings, "when there would have
Continued on Page 2, Column 4
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
BOOK REPORT
CHARGES FRAUD
IN CONDUCT OF
STATE PRINTERY
Strobridge Committee Al
leges Former Head of De
partment, W. W. Shannon,
Conspired With Four
Firms to Exclude All Oth
ers in Selling Materials to
State—Declares That Low
Grade Stock Was Sold at
High Grade Prices Far in
Excess of Needs of Office
TEACHERS OF STATE
TAINTED BY TRUST
Agents of Concerns Hold
Positions in Schools While
Active in Advancing In
terests of Makers of Books
in Other Commonwealths
—New Board of Educa
tion Urged for Control—
Old One Exculpated Be
cause It Could Exercise
, No Power in the Matter
' ?*;"•< CALL BtntEAtf.
SACRAMENTO HOTEL.
Sacramento, January 2S.
By GEORGE A. VAN SMITH
Fraud, favoritism, improper account
ing and connivance with favored con
tractors, resulting in extorting thou
sands of dollars from the parents and
guardians of the school children of
California are some of the specific
charges that will be made against for
mer Slate Printer W. W. Shannon to
morrow by the Strobridge textbook in
vestigation committee.
Pour concerns, the Zellerbach Paper
company, H. S. Crocker company, E. J.
Shattuck company and George D. Gra
ham, are involved In the charges as
beneficiaries if not as parties to the
misconduct charged to Shannon.
These concerns are charged with
controlling the state's business and
foisting low grade materials on the
commonwealth at high grade prices
through the connivance of the ousted
official. Their operations, it will be
charged, covered a period of eight and
a half years.
TOTALS NEARLY* ONE MILLION*
The aggregate of their contracts, as
will be shown by the inquisitors' re
port, was approximately $800,000.
The Zellerbach company's contracts
amounted to $331,000, the H. S. Crocker
company's business with th© printing
offlce through Shannon to $390,000.
The Shattuck company did an aggre
gate business with Shannon of $47,500
and the investigators found that Gra
ham was the least favored of the
quartet in that his concern received
contracts aggregating only $26,000.
The voluminous report containing
more than 6,000 words will be accom
panied by a full transcript of the tes
timony taken by the committee. This
transcript will contain more than
11,000 words, covering the examina
tion of many witnesses at hearings
extending for a number of months.
COMMINITY OF INTEREST CHARGE
While the report will definitely
charge a community of interest among
the book concerns and improper in
fluences exercised by their representa
tives, its most sensational disclosures
Continued on Page 3, Column 1
_#9S__> sx " 'JZI? 4
MET -•) "'^fi! 5 * *
After Dinner
Mellow Mints
Delicious cubelets of cream candy,
delicately flavored with pepper
mint.
4 CANDY STORES

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