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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, January 30, 1913, Image 1

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The New Call's Edition at 6:00 A. M. Contains News That Does Not Get Into Regular City Papers
Highest Temperature Yesterday, 54; Lowest Tuesday
Night. For detail* of the Weather nee page 13.
San HAS
Ft"3.1l CI SCO l i e coasts largest ship*
building plant; it built
the battleship Oregon and
the Olympia.
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 61.
ALAMEDA COUNTY
WILL MAKE GOOD
PROMISE FOR 1915
———— -.-„ j, v _-•; -
Enabling Act Will Be Pre-;
sented to Legislature This;
Week Authorizing the
East Bay Board of Super
visors to Call a Special
$1,000,000 Bond Election!
ACTION IS RESULT
OF AN AGREEMENT]
Oakland Chamber of* Com-;
merce to Send I. H. Clay, j
W. E> Gibson and Other;
Members to Sacramento
to Urge Passage of Act 1
for Exposition's Benefit
OAKLAND, Jan. 2?.—Alameda county
will make good on its promise of
• 1,000,000, made two years ago, to aid
the Panama-Pacific international ex
position by subscribing that sum raised
by a bond issue. An enabling act will
he presented to the legislature this
■week, authorizing the board of super
visors of Alameda county to call a spe
cial election to decide on a $1,000,000
bond issue.
The decision that aid will be granted
Pan Francisco in the fair was the re
sult of an agreement reached after de
liberation and discussion held between
representatives of the two cities—a
bona fide contract. The consideration
accepted in return for aid to San Fran
cisco as a commercial and industrial
ally grants the recognition of Oak
land and carries with it the assurance
that Oakland will receive the proper
treatment during the big fair year in
the way of landing facilities and trans
portation accommodations.
PLAN APPROVED AND I RGED j
At a meeting of the executive
mittee of the Chamber of Commerce
this morning the plan was discussed in
the phases broached at previous meet
ings between representatives of the
two cities in an effort to reach an
agreement ami a meeting of the board
of directors of the ohamb"- this after
noon resulted in the plan being ap-
nd most strongly urged. I. H.
Clay and W. E. Gibson, accompanied
by other members of the board of di
rectors and the chamber, will go to
Sacramento tomorrow to see that the
enabling act is placed before the legis
lature.
The measure that will be presented
Tvas drawn by Attorney Ft. If. Fitzger
ald after a consultation with President
''. '*. Moore of the exposition com
pany. It is in, the form of an en
abling act through which Alameda
county may incur a bonded indebted
ness of $1,000,000, the proceeds to go
to San Francisco in return for stock
in the company, the bonds to run for
40 years at an interest per annum of
6 per cent :ind the interest to be
raised through increase in assessed
tax valuation.
NO DOUBT OF PASSAGE
The act will be presented by a mem
ber of the Alameda county delegation
and will be urged by the Oakland com
mittee. The nature of the agreement
and the old promise, reinforced by the
heavy interests involved, leave no
doubt in the minds of the local men
who are behind the measure that it
will pass without a question. Every
means will be used to see that the act
is introduced and passed before the
week is over and it is too late.
The money will be expended under
"'ich terms as the legislative authority
( ? this county shall dictate. That the
county take stock In the fair com
pany was the suggestion of C. C. Moore
during a consultation held recently,
any profits arising from the bonds thus
reverting to the county. This prac
tically amounts to a guarantee against
loss. The bonds are understood to be
nonassessable. At all events the bonds
are to be taken with the option of tak
ing stock in the fair. The fact of
their purchase has been understood'
not to presuppose that this county is
obligated to take the fair stock.
BENEFIT TO COM Ml NITY
Outside of the fact that the actiun
of the county in subscribing the
$1,000,000 will be in the nature of the
payment of a Just moral obligation, as
was conceded today by the directors of
the Chamber of Commerce, the act is
legarded as one which will be of much
benefit to this community and to Ala
meda county. ?* Niy of those urging
the action are heavy personal con
tributors to the fair fund, and it is
their belief tiiat the subscription wiil
be of undoubted good, not only in the
effect of bringing money and people to
this community, but from the amicable
spirit it will foster.
Back of the action to be taken lies
a promise made two years ago at the
time the fair site was before con
gress, when San Francisco and New
Ortaana were contenders for the fair.
While the decision was stil! in doubt
\: meeting of the directors of the
i iamber of Commerce was called and a
telegram rent to Congressman Joseph
Continued on Page 2, Column C
"The People's Newspaper' 1
DOG NEMESIS FOR
ONE ARM AUTOIST
Frou-Frou Killed and Mistress
Lobbies Bill Requiring Ttvo
Hands to Steer
(Special Dispatch to Th* Cain
OAKLAND, Jan. 2?. — Because a
highly prized dog was killed, by an
automobile driven by a man with one
arm, a bill may be passed by the legis
lature making it an offense for a one
armed man to art as pilot for a ben
zine buggy on a public highway. The
dog was Frou-Frou, its owner is Mrs.
Henry A. L,afier, the chauffeur 1n ques
tion is one George Rose, and the solon
who Is pondering over the new bill is
Senator E. K. Strobrldge. He has taken
up the matter at the request of Mrs.
Lafler, who has gone to Sacramento
and who holds that Frou-Frou would
never have met his untimely end had
Rose been equipped with two arms.
#
BOTH THE TIPPER AND
. * TIPPEE FACE A FINE
Assembly of North Carolina Legislature
Passe* Bill Seeking to Curb
the tiratultlea Evil
RALEIGH. N. C, Jan. 29. —An antl
tipping hill, making both those who
give tips and those who receive them
In hotels, cafes, dining and sleeping
cars liable to fine, passed the lower
house of the North Carolina assembly
here today.
VALE MAN ELOPES WITH
GENERAL KELLY'S NIECE
Cable From Pari* Explain*) Dt*ap
pearaare, a Mystery Since
Christ ma*>
(Speeiai Wspstea to The Call)
NKW HAVEN", Conn.. Jan. 29.—How
ard C. Sykes, a Yale scientific scholar,
whose parents live in New York, and
who disappeared from Yale during the
Christmas vacation, cabled from Paris
tonight that he has eloped with Jean
nette Mcllwaner a granddaughter of
General Crook, the Indian fighter, and
a niece of General Kelly. They met In
Englewood, N. J., during the vacation
and were married in New York. Sykes
was a brilliant scholar. Miss Mc-
Tlwane's home is in Wheeling, W. Ya.

INNOCENTLY A BIGAMIST
Mr*. Dare Bond-Henry Moore-William.
I.owe Geta Ttto Final* In One Day
(Special DUpateh to The Call)
COLUSA, Jan. 29.—Married three
times without a divorce, Mrs. William
Lowe found herself innocently a big
amist until today. She was granted an
interlocutory decree from each of her
first two husbands, but in neither case
did she get a final decree until today.
She had thought the Interlocutory de
crees sufficient. Mrs. Lowe waited a
year in each case before marrying. She
will now be remarried to her third hus
band. She was first Mrs. Dave Bond,
then Mrs. Henry Moore, and now is
Mrs. William Lowe.
TOOTH OPERATION FATAL
| New York Sale* Manager Dies on Port
land Hospital Table
PORTLAND. Ore., Jan. 29.—Edward
IR. Rice of New York, general sales
[ manager of the United States Rubber
jcompany and an official of the New
York Life Insurance company, died
j during an. operation here today. Mr.
i Rice, who was in Portland on business,
! had been troubled several days from
|an ulcerous condition of a tooth, and
physicians advised an operation on the
jaw. Mr. Rice died while under the in-
fluence of an anesthetic. His body will
be taken to Buffalo.
$25,000 STOLEN 'FROM
LINER'S STRONG ROOM
Daring Thief Takes Case of Gold,
Leaving Nine Others Intact
MADRID, Jan. 29.—A case of .gold,
valued at 100,000 marks ($25,000) was
stolen from the strongroom of ths
German liner Cap Blanco on the voy
age from Rio de Janeiro, according to
dispatches from Vigo, Spain. The door
of the strongroom was opened by a
duplicate "key. Nine other similar
cases, forming a consignment of gold
from Rio de Janeiro to Berlin, were
found* intact.
CHILD FATALLY BURNED
Four Year Old Sets Fire to Nightgown
While Playing With Matches
' OAKUND, Jan. 29.—Setting fire to
his nightgown with matches, Stanley
(Voter, aged 4 years, was fatally burned
' this morning and died at Fabiola hos
pital at 4 o'clock this afternoon. His
mother, Mrs. J. Croter, In extinguishing
the flames which enveloped the boy,
sustained serious burns of the arms and
hands.
REBELS CLOSE TO JUAREZ
Advance Guard of Salasar's Army Is
Expected to Attack Today
EL PASO. Tex., Jan. 29.—Tex»#
rangers report a large body of men. be
lieved to be the advance guard of Gen
eral Salazar's rebel army, within three
miles of Juarez and drawing closer to
that It is persistently reported
that the rebels will attack at daybreak.
MEASLES CLOSE SCHOOLS
VISALIA. Jan. 29.—The Visalia city
schools, including three grammar
schools and the high school, have been
closed indefinitely on account of an
epidemic of measles. More than 80
cases are reported.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
SAN FRANCISCO. THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 1913.— F
HANDSOME PAUL,
SANS TIGER SKIN,
GUEST OF TOMBS
"Prince de Clermont" Re
luctantly Admits He's
Original of "Three •
Weeks" Hero
STEAL THAT WATCH
OF PATSY'S? NEVER!
"Abominable Lies" of "Poi
soned Pen" Land Him in
That "Horrid" Jail
(Special Dispatch to "Tbe Call)
NEW YORK, Jan. 29.—Sans tiger
skin, sans love, sans $1,000, sans every
thing, the Prince de Clermont Is the
guest of the rlty of New York. His
bed an Iron cot, his home a cell.
The big blonde Englishman who
called himself Paul Allen, to hide his
regal blood and the fact, as he said.
that he -was the original of Paul in
Elinor Glyn's "Three Weeks." has
been languishing- in the tombs since
January IR, waiting to have a charge
of grand larceny preferred by "Patsy";
investigated.
In neither Whittaker's peerage nor
the Almanac de Gotha can be found
mention of a Prince de Clermont, nor
of his principality, but a little thing
like that did not bother Paul Allen.
or, a R he now calls himself, Charles
Robinson.
SAD! SAD! HK'S DISCOVERED
It is fine, of course, to be an Elinor
Olyn hero, but to be discovered when
one is trying to keep the news from the
world—that is better. And it is prob
able the truth never would have been
known had not some "poisoned pen"
written a letter to Magistrate Corrigan.
The letter told all and it only remained
for the "prince" to confirm W.
"My word—it Ist perfectly shocking
that the truth has been made known."
he exclaimed when asked as to his
identity. 'yes, I am Paul, the hero of
the novel, 'Three Weeks,' but. 'pon my
word, there is no truth in the charge
of my having stolen Patsy* watch. She
gave it to me to pawn and I returned,
the money and ticket to her. I am
really here because of the animosity
and Jealousy of three women.
SHE HAS SERPENT'S TONGUE
"I was rehearsing an original dance
with Patsy Arlington, who made the
charge against me, and when I found
that she did not know how to dance
I broke away from her. After this I
became acquainted with two other
women—one a cabaret agent, and the
other Miss Barnet. 'Pon my wqrd, I
am Innocent of any theft, and all she
says about me are abominable lies.
"On the night of January 17 a horrid
Continued on Page 2. Column 3
CONTRACTOR IS HURT IN
AN AUTOMOBILE CRASH
Alameda Man Severely Injured When Wife
Guides Machine in Front of Train
rial Dig patch to The Call)
AUAMEPA. Jan. 29.— F. N. Strang, a
rontractor, was seriously injured this
afternoon when an automobile in which
he, his wife and young son were rid
ing, was struck by a westbound South
ern Pacific train in Fernside boulevard
near High street.
Strang was picked up unconscious
and conveyed to the emergency hos
pital, where it was found that he had
suffered a severe concussion of the
brain and internal Injuries.
Mrs. Strang, who was at the wheel
of the machine, and the child, escaped
injury by remaining In the automobile.
Strang jumped from the auto just be
fore the collision and struck with ter
GRANDMA TAKES
AUTO "JOY RIDE"
Mrs. Electa Kennedy Celebrates
Birthday at Age of 103— Boy
of 75 Lives With Her
(Hwrial Dlnpatrb to The Call)
HEALDSBURG, Jan. 29.—"Grandma"
Electa Kennedy celebrated her one
hundred and third birthday anniversary
here today, surrounded by loving and
admiring friends. She prepared and
cooked two large custards for the din
ner and during the afternoon went for
a "Joy ride" in an automobile provided
by her admirers.
"Grandma" Kennedy was born In
Derby, Vt., January 29, 1810, when
Madison was president of the United
States and Napoleon was carving a
new map out of Europe with his
armies. She has crossed the continent
five times and has resided in Sonoma
county for about C 5 years. A son 75
years old resides with her in this city.
' Mrs. Kennedy does all her own house
work, assisted by her son. She Is able
to read and sew without glasses.
MILITANT WOMEN
DEFY COURT AND
PREDICT TROUBLE
"General" Drummond With
Thirty Followers Sent to
Jail Fourteen Days
by Magistrate
"HUNGER STRIKE" IS
NEXT PLANNED
Window Smashing on Small
Scale Resumed Last Night
Following Trials
LONDON, Jan. 29. —"General" Mrs.
Drummond and 30 other militant suf
fragettes will spend the next 14 days
in jail as the fesult of their determina
tion to force David Lloyd-George, chan
cellor of the exchequer, to receive them
In the house of commons last evening.
All the prisoners declared, after they
•were sentenced today, that they would
start a "hunger strike." The accused
women were brought up at Bow street
police court before Robert Marshall,
police magistrate.
Mrs. Drummond complained during
the hearing that the police had handled
her roughly when she was arrested.
She declared a patrolman had thrown
her in the mud.
"It is now war to the knife." she told
the magistrate, and continued:
LOTS OF TROUBLE AHEAD
"You and Mr. Lloyd-George have lots
of trouble ahead of you. You will have
to do the dirty work, and you will have
plenty of It."
The women all refused the option of
I paying a fine instead of going to prison.
The police court looked like a busy
railroad station when the suffragettes
were arraigned. Most of them had
made preparations to go to prison.
They carried boxes, bags, blankets and
fur lined coats.
Fourteen days' imprisonment was the
sentenced pronounced on n*o*t of the
women brought up today at the various
police courts in London. The accused
included window smashers and letter
box damagers. as well as the raiders of
the house of commons, under the leader
ship of Mrs. Drummond.
Some of the women who had shat
tered valuable plate glass shop win
dows were committed for trial at the
Old Bailey sessions.
The favorite nickname given to the
militant suffragettes In London is
"bashibazoukesses."
ONE LEADER RELEASED
Mrs. Despard, a leader of the mili
tant suffragettes, who, with two
women companions, was sentenced yes
terday to 14 days imprisonment on the
charge of resisting the police, was re
leased this evening, some unknown
Continued on Page 2, Column 5
rifle force on his head. Tie was hurled
aside by the train as he fell. One rear
wheel was ripped from the automobile.
The accident occurred on a curve.
Mrs. Strang said that she noticed an
automobile of her brother in law, V. N.
Strang, standing in the boulevard near
a house Strang is building. She could
not clear the machine without turning
on to the railroad track, and was in
the act of turning when the train
struck the automobile.
Strang later was taken to the Ala
meda sanatorium. Dr. Arthur Hier
onymus says it will be several days be
fore the outcome of the injuries can
be determined.
PROMOTION ENDS
YEARS OF LABOR
Twenty-five Years of Stenogra
phy Rewarded by IVomans
Being Made Secretary
{Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW BRITAIN, Conn., Jan. 29—From
the humble position of stenographer to
secretary of a 12,000,000 corporation Is
the jump that Miss Martha A. Parsons
of this city has taken in a quarter of a
century.
The woman has been elected secre
tary of Landers. Frary & Clark, and
succeeds George M. Landers, president
pro tern of the Connecticut senate.
When Miss Parsons went to work in
the factory 26 years ago as a stenogra
pher the officers of the corporation rec
ognized her unusual ability and it was
not long before she was appointed per
sonal secretary to Charles S. Landers,
son of the late Congressman George M.
Landers Sr., who was the moving spirit
in the promotion of the company.
j Since then she has climbed the ladder
steadily.
"An Independent Newspaper" j
Prince Chooses Pretty American
Murat to Marry Helena Stallo
* i
Helena Mac Donald Stallo, Cincinnati heiress, who will wed prince of French J
republic February 6.
Cincinnati Heiress Engaged Be=
fore But Changed Her Mind
CINCINNATI, O, Jan. 29.—The mar
riage of Prince Murat and Miss Helena
Mac Donald Stallo, a cable message
from Paris says, has been set for Feb
ruary 6 in the church of St. Honore
there. The ceremony will be a quiet
one, owirrg to the recent death of the
prince's father.
Miss Stallo and her sister lived with
fheir grandfather. Alexander Mac Do
nald of Standard Oil fame after the
FORMER SOLON'S WIFE,
DEFYING POLICE, DOES
NOT SPARE THAT TREE
Woman Holds Lantern as
Workmen Demolish Ob
struction to View
■• WASHINGTON, Jan. : 29.—Defying the
police. Mrs. John ; ; B. Henderson, wife
of former J' Senator John ;P. Henderson
of Missouri, last night had two labor
ers from the Henderson estate cut down
a large tree on - a public thoroughfare
because \ It obstructed " her • view ,• of the
street.
: Colonel Truman H. ;; Lanhan, superin
tendent of parkings - : for ■> the district,
said tonight the matter had been placed
in the hands of the police for action.
Mrs. Henderson, who stood by hold
ing a lantern while her workmen oper
ated, declared that for several months
she had requested the < authorities to
look after the offending tree, but that
they paid little attention to the matter.
"Last night," she coninued, "with
two of my laborers I went to the street
corner to clear rubbish left on the
sidewalk. While there I determined to
finish the whole Job. I ordered the
tree sawed down and my Instructions
were followed."
She declared her willingness to stand
the consequences of her act.
CHURCH POOR BOX ROBBED
St. Dominic's |n Benlcia la Looted by
Tulevcw
BENICIA, Jan. 29. —Thieves entered
St. Dominic's Catholic church in
Benicta last night and tore the poor
box from its place, taking Its contents.
The box contained only.a few small
coins.
WEATHEK FORECAST:
Fair, wlfli tog; light north wind, chnuglnc to wm«.
''' ' i'.i. . . ■
|S.OOO to $10,000 in mercantile busiivs: offer
partnership or firm interest; would guarantee
GERMAN man and wife want positions: wife
i food cook, man gardening and housework. M.
For Continuation of These Advertisements
See Classified Pages
death of their mother. For several
years while the girls were in their
teens they spent part of the time here
and the summers usually at Mr. Mac-
Donald's home on Prince Edward isl
and.
A few years ago the engagement of
Miss Stallo to Nils Florman was an
nounced, only to be followed by the
news that the prospective bride had
changed her mind. Miss Stallo's fa
vorite diversion is tennis.
LONELY ROADHOUSE IN
YUKON REGION SCENE
OF A TRIPLE TRAGEDY
Proprietor Believed to Have
Killed Wife, Stableman
and Self
DAWSON. T. T., Jan. 29.—Ernest Ber
wash, driver of the White Pass over
land stage, reached here today with
news of a triple tragedy enacted in the
lonely Black Hills roadhouse, where he
discovered the dead bodies of William
F. Smith, his wife, and Michael Kelly,
the stableman. All had been shot.
Kelly's body was found in the stable,
lying across the hay. Apparently there
had been a struggle before the fatal
shot. Smith and his wife were lying
on the floor of the bedroom In a pool
of blood. Smith, who was the pro
prietor of the_ roadhouse, had a rifle
between his knees, with a string at
tached to the trigger.
All the victims were dressed, al
though Smith's feet were bare.
It is believed that he crept out to
the stable to surprise Kelly, of whom
he Is said to have been Jealous, and,
after killing him. returned to shoot
his wife. Then he killed himself. A
quantity of money was found scat
tered about the floor.
Smith formerly kept a laundry in
Dawson City, and during the gold run
was considered a wealthy man. Mrs.
Smith was formerly Mrs. William
Jones, mother of Miss Jessie Jones,
once a famous local amateur theatri
cal star.
The police are investigating the pos
sibility* of the murder, as the powder
marks on Smith's face do not alto
gether justify the theory of suicide.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
NEGOTIATIONS
CALLED OFF;
BALKAN ALLIES
RESUME WAR
Within Four Days, if Tur
key's Note to Powers Fails
to Incorporate Fresh Pro
posals of a Satisfactory
Nature, Four Govern
ments Will Concentrate
Their Forces on Fortress
of Adrianople and Loose
Big Siege Batteries on It
QUARTET OF ENVOYS
REMAIN IN LONDON
Should Roumania Attempt
to Occupy Bulgarian Ter
ritory While Hostilities
Are in Progress, Latter
Nation Will Permit Her to
Do So, but Threatens to
Exact Costly Reprisals
Later for What Is
Termed Racial Disloyalty
BULLETIN
LONDON. Jan. 39.—A Constantinople
dispatch to the Post hy way of Con.
stanza ways It Is evident that flarhMna
la on at Tchatalja, m wounded men
are arriving from there constantly.
Unconfirmed reports say that 14,000
Circassian troop* have mutinied and
rioting also la reported among the
troop* at the Dardanelles.
A dlapatch to the Chronicle from
< nnntautinople (riving: similar report*
says that the advance of the army in
Impossible, ns half of the 60.000 trans
port animals are either dead or 111
from lack of proper food. The roads
mre in deplorable condition because of
the heavy rains.
LONDON. Jan. 29.—The peace nego
tiations, which reached a deadlock over
the cession of Adrianople January 6.
finally were broken today by a note
which the plenipotentiaries of the Bal
kan allies presented to Reschld Pasha,
head of the Turkish delegation.
Notwithstanding this rupture, there
still are optimists in the diplomatic,
world who hope a resumption of the
war yet may be averted, either through
' fresh proposals that Turkey is reported
to be including in the note she will
deliver to the powers tomorrow or
through the fall of Adrianople before
activities can be begun again at the
Tchatalja lines.
FAILURE ONLY INTERLUDE
A majority of the Balkan delegates
refuse to admit the likelihood of either
contingency, believing that the life of
the Young Turk government depends
upon the resumption of the war even if
the allies should be willing to postpone
the conflict. They are of the opinion
that the present failure of diplomacy,
at the worst, only is an interlude, how
ever, for they will leave four represen
tatives in London to undertake the set
tlement anew.
Reschid Pasha, after receiving the
note, said:
"The consequences may be of the
gravest nature. The responsibility lies
not alone with the allies, but with the
powers, who encouraged the Balkan
states and have shown no fairness
toward Turkey, although before .the
war they proclaimed solemnly tha prin
ciple of the unchangeability of the
status quo."
CONCENTRATE ON ADRIANOPLE
Tho plan of the allied governments,
so far, as the plenipotentiaries are in
formed, is to concentrate their forces
on Adrianople immediately after the
expiration of the prescribed four days,
if the surrender of that fortress does
not occur in the meantime. They be
ljeve that a few days' bombardment by
the big siege batteries which now sur
round Adrianople will bring about Its
capitulation.
The Balkan representatives declare
CHAMPAGNE;
PIPER-HEIDSIECK
————i—
Ancl" M°. n HEIDSIECK fondee en 1785
KUNKELMANN 4C» Succ '.•/'.
REIMS
CHARLES MEINECKE A, CO.
Sa*MT« racine C«a»t. Sl4 •aeaAM«MT« at., s. «•

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