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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 06, 1913, Image 1

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The New Call's Edition at 6:00 A. M. Contains News That Does Not Get Inttr Regular City Papers
(Unbent Temperature YeMerda>, «2; l.oviemt Tuesday
X>ght, 52. For detallw of «he Weather «cc pa«e 13.
The value of £<>ld received at the
San Francisco mint in January was
$2,962,702
Its weight was 143,320 fine ounces.
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. i>B
BULGARS OPEN
ATTACK UPON
FORTS ALONG
DARDANELLES
While Great Siege Guns Are
Reducing Adrianople an
Expedition Is Hurled
From the Rear Against
Batteries Planted in Gal
lipoli Peninsula to Destroy
Defenses Guarding Sea
Approach to Constanti
nople and Take Capital
ISLAM GOVERNMENT
IS DRIFTING TO RUIN
Ottoman Troops at Front
Suffer Terribly From Cold,
Lack of Food and Shelter,
While Smallpox, Enteric
Fever, Dysentery and
Pneumonia Have Relieved
Asiatic Cholera as Grim
Allies of Victorious Artnies
—Tchatalja Demoralized
LONDON, Feb. 6.—The Bulgarians
me devoting their chief attention to
the bombardment of Adrianople and
an attempt to capture the Gallipoli
peninsula and so take the Turkish
forts In the rear.
A sharp engagement began late yes
terday on the Tchatalja lines. The
•oar of the cannon plainly was audi-
Me in the Turkish capita].
; During a sortie by the Turkish
troops from the city today 1,000 of
i were taken prisoners by the
Kulg-arians.
ai.ml:s iwkst gallipoli
An official dispatch issued at Con
stantinople indicates that the Bulgar- j
:mhs have been successful in their first
operations before Gallipoli, and, ac
cording to a Sofia dispatch, the cap
ture of the peninsula is the chief ob
ject of the Bulgarians for the time
being, and no serious attempt will be
made to force the Tchatalja lines.
The same dispatch says that the Bul
erarian attack on Gallipoli is supported
by the Greek navy in the gulf of
Saros.
Fifty thousand Bulgarians were
I'Hided along this coast last November, |
and it may be presumed that during
■ armistice this force was strength
ened by artillery.
(IBJKITIVE IS LONSTAVriNOPLE
Should the Bulgars capture the Turk
ish forts there is nothing to prevent
the Greek fleet from entering the Dar
danelles, where, In the gpinion of na
\ al officers, it easily could defeat the
inferior Turkish fleet, in which case
Constantinople would be at the mercy
of the allies.
The Constantinople correspondent of
the Standard sends a strange story, re
porting that the remnant of the Turk
ish army of Monastir, which never ha 3
lieen precisely accounted for, still is
operating in that district and has cap
tured the important town of Keritza,
less than 50 miles from Monastir.
MISERY RAVAGESSTAMBOIL
The Daily Telegraph publishes a long
uncensored dispatch from Its corre
spondent, Ellis Ashmead Bartlett, In
Constantinople, in which he says the
▼ Turkish people are In such a state of
misery and destitution as a result of
the war that they are completely in
different as to the fate of Adrianople.
"The cabinet is in a quandary," says
the correspondent. "Jt knows that It
will be compelled to cede Adrianople
and is only seeking some means to save
its face. It is said that the coup d'etat j
only was intended to occur after Kia
mil Pasha surrendered Adrianople, but
was precipitated by some mistake.
Hence the difficulty the ministry now
is in.
OTTO MAX TREAM "XV I-JMPTY
% "There is not a cent in the treasury j
and there are no means of gettln c !
money until peace is concluded. Mean
while, the country is drifting to ruin
and bankruptcy.
"A great anti-war demotuKratioa oc
curred Sunday In front of the war of
fice, at which the young Turks were '
il' nounoed us murderers and thieves.
Mahmoud Kchefkct Pasha appeared on
the balcony and tried to make a speech,
but was greeted with opprobrious epi
thets.
"The misery in the Turkish camps is !
indescribable. It has been bitterly cOiJ. !
With a heavy snow; the soldiers are ill
fed and badly sheltered. Smallpox, e;;
--teric fever, dysentery and pneumonia
have replaced Asiatic cholera.
TCHATALJA IS DEMORALIZED
"It is understood that the forces at
Tchatalja have been reduced to
hich is considered ample to defend the i
lines. Largo reinforcement* have been
srnt to Gallipoli, where there now
70,000 men. There la talk of landing
Continued on rage 3, Column 2
"The People's Newspaper"
BANKER'S WIFE BARS
HOME TO KEEP HEIRS
Mrs. Bishop Blocks Husband's Move to Get Children —
Divorce Papers Naming Initialed Women Corespond
ents Puzzles New York's Smart Set
(Special Dispatch to Tlie Call)
NEW YORK, Feb. mansion
of Mrs. Abigail Hancock Bishop, who is
suing the banker, James Cunningham
Bishop, for divorce "and $50,000 a year
alimony, is bottled, barred and barri
caded tonight.
Mrs. Bishop gave orders to make the
house at Madison avenue and Sixty
fifth street secure from invasion as
soon as she heard that legal steps are
being taken by Bishop to deprive her
of the custody of her children.
A mysterious "Mrs. A.", described as
an English woman of great social
prominence in New York, Newport and
London, and a "Mrs. W., also known
as "Mrs. K." are mentioned by Mrs.
Bishop as causes, additional to Mrs.
Lelia Galnes Gwathmey, which broke
up her homo.
The bankers association with these
initialed women, as well as violent
attacks on herself, are described in a
GIRL STRIKER IS
SLAIN WHEN SHOP
PROPRIETOR FIRES:
Two Other Women and Man
in Crowd Wounded and
Rochester Employer
Held for Murder
ROCHESTER. N. V.. Fob- 5. —The first
shedding of blood in connection with
the strike of garment workers, which
has spread from New York to Roches
ter and Boston, occurred here today,
when Valentine Sauter, proprietor of a
clothing shop, fired one shell from a
shotfeun into a crowd ot strikers whe
were engaged in a demonstration in
front of his place of business. Ida
Braeman, 17 years old. was killed by
the shot and two other women and a
man were injured.
Sauter employs about 40 machine
hands, and 700 strikers went to his
shop in an effort to persuade the opera
tives to walk out. Stones were thrown
freely in the demonstration.
Sauter fired from an upstairs window
of the shop, the pellets scattering among
the crowd of strikers. Miss Braeman
died almost instantly. Sauter was ar
rested. He is charged with murder in
the first degree.
More arrests will be made, the police
say, on charges of rioting.
James McManus of the state bureau
of mediation and arbitration, who has
been trying to settle the strike, sent a
circular letter to the manufacturers
and employes suggesting that a con
ference be arranged. Such a confer
ence, he believes, will result in settling
the trouble or denning the issues.
So far the strikers have made no
formal presentation or demands.
SMALLPOX IS "MORNING
AFTER" AT DULUTH BALL
Policemen's Hop Called (ireat Success
Until Glider is Sent to Quaran
tine 2.000 Wqjriei!
DULUTH, Minn.. Feb. 5. —Duluth's
annual policemen's, ball last Monday
night was considered a success until
today when it was discovered that one
of the dancers, a young man who
glided over the floor with many young
women, is suffering from smallpox.'
Worse than that, when he danced a
rash was noticed on his face and hands.
The patient refused to tell his name
and policemen who later danced with
his partners were busy with disinfect
ants when they heard of his ailment.
Six cases of the malady were reported
to the hospital department, and each
of the 2,000 persons who attended the
policemen's ball is wondering if he es
caped contagion.
TREE CHOPPER TO COURT
Warrant Srrrwl on Mrs. Hrndtnon for
DeMrnylnie Capital Property
WASHINGTON, Feb. f>.- Mrs. John B.
licnrter*)!!, wife <>f former Senator
Henderson of Missouri, was served to
day with a police court warrant charg
ing hpi , with destroying district of
Columbia property. She was not
arrested, but was ordered to appear in
court tomorrow. Mrs. Henderson, one
night about a week ago, held ■ lan
tern while laborers cut down a large
tree in the street.
LATIN PRESIDENT SHOT
Salvador Executive Wouadrd by Guate
malan, 'Who Iμ Arreated
SAN SALVADOR, Feb. s.—An at
tempt was made last night to assassi
nate the president of Salvador, Dr,
Manuel E. Araujo. The president was
wounded, but none of the wounds is
considered serious. The leader of the
president's assailant is under arrest,
lie is Virgilie Mulatillo, a Guatemalan.
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 8. **
great stack of affidavits now in the
hands of Supreme Justice Hendrlcks.
They were filed by Mrs. Bishop through
her counsel, Louis S. Posner, in sup
port of her motion for alimony and the
custody of her five daughters.
In these affidavits Mrs. Bishop tells
of the "polite" methods Adopted by her
husband of bestowing: financial aid on
"Mrs. A." by the secret purchase of her
paintings on exhibition at a Fifth ave
nue art gallery.
Some hint of the identity of "Mrs.
W." is given in a letter written by
Mary Bishop, the eldest daughter, \r
which she refers to "papa having spent
a night at Mrs. Willis* home in Long
Branch."
But society is much mystified as to
the personality of the other initialed
smart set leader, and everybody Is ask
ing, "Who is Mrs. A.?" So far Mrs.
Bishop refuses absolutely to enlighten
her friends or the public.
MONSTER OF SEA
ALMOST DROWNS
OAKLAND BELLE
Helen Goodall Saves Sus
sette Greenwood From
Death by Killing Giant
Eel With Hatpin
lSr*»ci«! Dispatch to The Cell)
NEW YORK. Feb. 5.—A thri ling
fight with a green maury In the surf at
Xassau was the experience of two
Berkeley college girls who arrived to
day from the West Indies on the Vic
toria Larse.
Miss Hclet Goodall and Miss Sus
leette Greenwood, chaperoned by Mrs.
Goodall, made the trip to the West In
dies from their home in Oakland, Cal.
While standing in the shallow water
at Nassau two weeks ago Miss Green
wood was seized by the heel of her
bathjng slipper and thrown. She
screamed and Miss Goodall saw a huge
maury gripping her companion's foot
and lashing its eel like body furiously
in an attempt to drag the girl into deep
water.
A great green maury is a horrible
thing. It is a species of giant eel and
grows to a length of five or six feet,
ft is extremely ferocious and makes an
ugly fight In th« water.
Pulling a hatpin from her Panama
hat Mlsa Goodall thrust it into the
maury and fortunately pricked a vital
spot for the reptile let go of Miss
Greenwood.
Miss Goodall then dragged her friend
to the beach.
The body of the maury, with the hat
pin stuck in it, was found on the beach
the following day.
It measured four and a half feet in
length and was about as thick as a
mans arm.
FIVE POSTMEN BURNED
BY SUFFRAGETTE MAIL
Envelope* Containing Highly Inflam
mable Chemicals and Addressed to
Premier Asqatth "Blow Up. ,,
DUNDEE, Scotland. Feb. s.—Five
postmen were burned this evening, sev
eral of them quite seriously, by the
combustion of chemicals contained in
letters.
One of the postmen on returning
from his evening collection of mail
from the public letter boxes emptied
his bag on the sorting table at the
postofflce. The contents Instantly burst
into flames.
A large number of the envelopes con
tained tubes of phosphorus and other
highly inflammable chemicals.
They were addressed to Premier As- '
quith and the sheets of paper within
were inscribed:
"Justice for women."
BULL DOGS GUARD BODY
Illinois Officiate Hay shoot Animal* to
Bury Hermit Muster
JOTUST, 111., Fob. r.. -Two faithful
bull dogs arc guarding tonight the
body of John Zipf, a hermit who has
lived alone near here for 30 years.
The dogs have refused to allow county
officers to enter the cabin, and it may
be necessary to shoot them to bury the
body.
STATION AGENT IS SLAIN
Rvfdence of Straggle Laid
Indicate* Murder
MILLER, Neb.. Feb. s.—George Hood,
station agent of the Union Pacific at
this place, was found today lying: be
side the track close to the depot with
a bullet through his head. A window
of the depot was broken and there was
evidence of a btruffgl*.
SACRAMENTO GIRL
SAVES 4 CHUMS IN
VASSAR ACCIDENT
Dr. W. E. Briggs , Daughter
Heroine in Jumping Into
Lake to Save Her
Companions
ICE GIVES WAY UNDER
A TOBOGGAN PARTY
One of Number Drowned,
but California Student
Aids the Others
Dlxpntrh to The Call)
POUGHKEEPSIE, N. V., Feb. s.—At
the risk of her life Miss Phoebe Briggs,
daughter of Dr. William E. Briggs of
Sacramento, Cal., jumped into the chill
waters of a frozen lake and saved four
of her Vassar chums from drowning , .
Tonight the heroism of Miss Briggs is
the one bright ray which shines out
from a toboggan tragedy that has cast
a pall over the girls in the famous
woman's school.
Five young women, seniors of Vas
sar college, were borne down Sunset
hill tonight in a toboggan that crashed
through the ice of the artificial lake
on the Vassar campus. One of them,
Miss Elizabeth B. Mylod, 21 years,
daughter of John J. Mylod, corporation
counsel and democratic leader of
Poughkeepsie, was caught under the
frozen surface of the water and
drowned.
PLUNGES INTO ICY WATER
Heroic aid came to the other girls
from Miss Phoebe Briggs, an expert
swimmer and athlete. She plunged into
the icy waters and drew four of the
young women to the ice's edge. There
they were able to cling until Prof.
George B. Shattuck pushed out a plank
and dragged them to safety.
Besides Miss Mylod the girls on the
toboggan were Mildred Kenniston,
daughter of Fred A. Kenniston of Cam
bridge, Mass.; Myra Hulst. daughter of
C. J. Hulst of Ne,v Hamburg, N. V.;
Laura Reiner, daughter of ,/ohn Reiner
of Kingston, N. V.. and Annie J. Old
ham of Cleveland, Ohio.
After dinner the girls took out the
big, flat bottomed, curving bowed Cana
dian toboggan and dragged it to the
top of Sunset hill. The slope is about
500 feet long. They made five trips
without accident, the toboggan at no
time dashing as far out as the artificial
lake. Along the shore of the lake
planks had been stuck in the ice and
on them red flags waved and signs*
reading '"Danger." "No skating."'
MISS BRIGGS ATHLETE
There were no other toboganning
parties on the hill and the nipping cold
had kept most of the other students
Continued on Page 2, Column 3
HUSBAND OF THREE
FOOLED THEM ALL
Bigamist Keeps Homes Going
Three Years Without Either
Wife Knowing Facts
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK, Feb. s.—Tsidor Stein
berg, sentenced today to four years
and six months' imprisonment for big
amy, succeeded in keeping three estab
lishments going for three yars—all in
the same neighborhood—without one of
the plural wives knowing it. All three
wives were in court. Each pleaded
that the Judge be lenient.
"I think he has been punished
enough," wife No. 1 said, glancing con
temptously at wives No. 2 and 3.
"He must have had an unpleasant
experience with his first wife," pleaded
wife No. 2 .
"Could you blame him, judge," cried
wife No. 3, "for trying to get away
from those two women?"
All the wives have from one to five
children by Steinberg.
CACHED GOLD FOR CHURCH
Money Guarded For Years Will Start
New Episcopal Edifice
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WINTERS, Feb. s.—An old tin can
hidden in the cellar of the home of
Mrs. T. Moody of this city, today gave
up the amount with which a new
Episcopal church will be started in
this city. Mrs. Moody had guarded the
money for years, keeping a promise
she made when a religious movement
was started for the erection of an
Episcopal church. The amount found
was $539.
YANKEE ROUTS KROO FOES
American Officer Lent to Liberlan Gov.
-cruneat Defeats Native Rebels
MONROVIA. Liberia, Feb. 5. — A
crushing defeat with heavy slaughter
was inflicted on the Kroo natives of
Liberia January 27 by Major Ballard,
one of the American officers lent some
time ago to the Liberlan government.
Dispatches brought today by runner
state that Major Ballard with a force
of Liberian troops razed the Kroo
stronghold after a severe nght.
"An Independent Newspaper"
Beach Will Take Stand
Doctors Tell Stories
Mrs. Camilla O. Beach, whose husband is accused of attack upon her, which
„* • she declares was committed fcp a negro.
Society Leaders Pack Courtroom During Trial
Of Celebrated Assault Case
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
AIKEN, S. C. Feb. s.—Frederick O.
Beach will take the stand In his own
defense immediately upon the resump
tion of court tomorrow morning:, and
after he has given his version of the
events of the night of February 26 of
last year, when Mrs. Beach was as
saulted, Mrs. Beach will be the next
witness.
In anticipation of Mrs. Beach taking
the witness stand today, a crowd even
larger thaji that which yesterday
packed the courtroom flocked to the
courthouse when it became known
during the midday recess that the pros
ecution had rested its case.
standing room was at a premium, and
among the spectators were many more
tourists than were seen in the court
room yesterday.
At the afternoon session Mr.«. Oliver
Perrin of Ridgefield, Conn., joined the
party composed of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Harriman, Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Hol
-1 ins, Mrs. C Oliver Iselin, Frank Hitch
cock, Thomas Hitchcock and J. B. Ly
ons, who occupied seats today directly
behind Mr. and Mr*. Beach. Many well
known society women were glad to se
cure even standing room.
STATE RESTS ITS CASK
The state rested its case, which con
sisted almost entirely of an attack on
DOG'S BRAIN PLACED IN
MAN'S SKULL IN LAST
EFFORT TO SAVE LIFE
♦Patient in Michigan Hospital
Rallies and Has a Good
Chance to Recover
ANN ARBOR, Mich., Feb. s.—The
brain of a dog was transferred to a
man's skull in University hospital here
today. W. A. Smith of Kalamazoo had
been suffering from abscess on the
brain, and in a last effort to save his
life this remarkable operation was per
formed.
Opening bis skull, the surgeons re
moved the diseased portion of his brain
and in its place substituted the brain
of a dog.
Smith was resting comfortably to
night and the surgeons say he has a
good chance to recover.
BLIZZARD IN CHICAGO
One Man Freeees to Death In Winter's
Coldest Day—2 Below
CHICAGO, Feb. s.—One man was
found frozen to death today—-the cold
est day of the winter. There were
many accidents, small fires and much
suffering .of the » ity's poor. At 5 a. m.
the thermometer registered 2 degrees
below zero.
WKATHKR FORECAST!
finally, unsettled, with whower»j brisk rnnt wind.
LANDHCAPC fweener, etc. strictly M>bpr. eij
perlenced In all line*, tawtn, vejrotuhlps.
WANTEP — Lady, iinln«nm!>e.ed. to tmvol In
(.'nlifornia and Washington; one tnt'-rr-'trtl In
FOR CONTINUATION OF THESE ADVER
TISEMENTS SEE CLASSIFIED PACES.
the plausibility of Beach's story today.
The introduction of Beach's jeweled
penknife, upon which one jot the state's
witnesses claimed to have found traces
of blood corpuscles, was withheld by
the prosecution until the last. It had
been anticipated by the defense, and
they were prepared to meet expert tes
timony with expert testimony, even to
the extent of presenting a witness who
had examined the knife and had failed,
as he swore, to find any blood cells.
Four of the defense's witnesses were
examined this afternoon, and the testi
mony of all of them concerned the
knife.
Dr. D. Hastings Wyman, Jr., testified
that he had made a microscopic
examination of the knife and had
found traces of blood. Later he said
he took the knife to Augusta and sub
mitted it to Dr. C. D. Partridge, pro
fessor of microscopies of the University
of Georgia, who he said, refused to
express an opinion as to the presence
of blood. •
Then he went to Columbia, S. C, and
obtained a written opinion there from
Boykin Mims, an analyst, that there
was blood on the knife.
DOCTOR BECOMES CO\FI'SED
When the prosecutor announced at
Continued on rage 2, Column 6
JUDGE GRAHAM AND
RAKER ENTER RAGE
FOR DE HAVEN POST
Wickersham Is Believed to
Favor San Francisco Su
perior Court Jurist
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
WASHINGTON, Feb. s—Two new
candidates for the judgeship made
vacant by the death of Judge de Haven
were brought forward today in the
persons of Congressman Raker and
Judge Graham of the superior court of
San Francisco.
Judge Graham has been strong'y
hacked in many telegrams from San
Francisco lawyers, and it Is said that
his candidacy appeals strongly to At
torney General Wickersham. Congress
men Kahn and Needham have already
been backed- for the place, making
four candidates in all.
While it may turn out that Presi
dent Taft will finally send the name to
the senate, it is not likely that a con
firmation will be had. Senator Perkins,
not expecting confirmation this session,
is understood to be waiting to hear
from the Bar association of San Fran
cisco.
Raker will probably make a strong
fight fo rthe position after President
Wilson comes into office.
PRICE FIVK CENTS.
BIG CONCERNS
ARE SUSPECTED
OF MAMMOTH
COAL SWINDLE
Government Weaves Web of
Evidence Which Ques
tions Way That Agents of
Western Fuel Company,
Pacific Mail and Other
Shipping Corporations Are
Said to Have Received
Drawbacks in Duties on
Importations of Cargoes
MILLIONS ARE SAID
TO BE IN QUESTION
Federal Court Summons
Prominent Men to Appear
Before the United States
Grand Jury and Answer
to Chain of Allegations
Lodged With Government
in Expose Prepared by Se
cret Agents, Aided by For
mer Smuggler of Opium
Irregularities In drawbacks of certain
duties levied on tlie importation of
coal are said to have been discovered
by special agents of the United States
treasury department, in the relations
of the Western Fuel company with
officers of the Pacific Mail company
and a number of coastwise steamship
corporations.
Investigation pursued by the govern
ment for several months reached a
crux yesterday in the issuance of sub
penas on officers of the coal company
for their appearance before the fed
eral grand jury tomorrow afternoon.
The irregularities are said to reach
millions of dollars, and to approximate
the immense double dealing of the
Havemeyer sugar trust, indicted by
the government in 1910. The alleged
criminal operations are said to extend
over a period of 20 years.
FULiL TONNAGE OVERSTATED
The suspicion is that the fuel trust
overstated the amount of coal tonnage
loaded on an outgoing vessel that it
might take fraudulent advantage of the
tariff provision granting a refund ol
45 cents on each ton of coal Intended
for American bottoms.
By padding tlie bill of lading an)
company could have received great con
signments of coal without the payment
of any duty.
The officers of the company for whose
appearance before the grand jury sni>
penas have been issued are Joseph L.
Howard, president, who lives at 87 Ver
non street, Oakland; James B. Smith,
vice president, whose residence is in
Hillsborough; D. C. Norcross. secretary,
of 2765 Union street, and Joseph T...
Schmitt, treasurer, who has apartments
at the Fairmont.
The company controls the importa
tion of New Wellington. Dunsmuir \\>!
lington and Cosmos coal.
The tariff act of 1909 provides that on
all coal imported into this country to
be used for fuel in American ships th«
duty of 45 cents a ton, made up of 4S
bushels, shall be refunded to the im
porter. The bill was designed to aid
American shipping.
PACIFIC MAII, I,ONG SUSPECTED
Frequently within the laet several
years reports have been made by offi
cers of the Pacific Mail Steamship com
pany of shortages in the coal lading ,
and that the vessels have not carried
the amount of fuel the shipping receipt
called for.
No investigation ever followed these
complaints far enough to reach the
stage of definite charge of fraud.
W. H. Tidwell. special agent of the
treasury department, with offices in the
custom house at Washington and Bat
tery streets, has had charge of the
present investigation of alleged fraud.
His operations have taken him over a
wide field of inquiry, and while the in
vestigation was directed at first into
BOORD'S
(CAT ON BARBEL BRAND)
GINS
L.OM>O>, E.\<.[..V.VU
i
"OLD TOM," "DRY"
and "TWILIGHT"
THE I'KRFECTIOX OF l>ll V VIS
CHARLES MEINCCKE & CO.
tmwtrr P***ixo c***t. 11* imuhut* *t.. •. «■

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