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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 13, 1913, Image 1

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The Latest News About the Mexican War Will Bt Published in 6 cfClock Edition of The Call
WEATHER FORECASTt
Fair, v»lth 1"O(K; mnrtfmtc wi , *! wind.
The U. S. Mint in San Francisco re
ceived 10,000 Ounces of Fine Gold
from Alaska. Nevada sent 3,311 ounces
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 75.
SHOT AND SHELL RAKE MEXICO CITY
Federals and Rebels Fight Against the Protest of Foreign Envoys
FULL MUNICIPAL
TROLLEY SYSTEM
TO HANDLE FAIR
Supervisors , Committee De
cides City Must Provide
Transportation—Engineer
to Be Called Upon at
Once to Give Specifica
tions for Network of Lines
HARBOR BOARD TO
BUILD BAY TRACKS
Conference With 1915 Direc
tors and State Commission
Solves Problem —Hamil-
ton Square "Short Line"
and Tunnels Are Included
in the Plans Formulated
Bow Problem Is Solved
Plans for Fair Trolleys
(Xi to undertake Immediate
extension of the municipal rall
n«T Into a complete »j-Mem af
fording adequate number of ear
lines.
City fpcinrfr to be railed npon
f»t cnff for fitlmatrn of coat of
nil DPCfMaiT- lines and special
bwnd election to be held.
State to Italic! double track
• nrface line alone "nater front
from the ferry building to tbe
exposition sroundn.
Hlt to construct « temporary
elevated rallrray over Mate inr
fnoe line along; congested por
tion of the Kmbareadero.
■Municipal "short line" to run
'mm ntation in Hamilton mquere
through Fillmore street tunnel
to Mtatlon vrlthin exposition
- - r- limit, on a 30 neeonda head-
Taj-.
Van .>>«» avenue. Inion afreet
and Stockton iitreet tunnel ex
tension* to the municipal rail
way to be built at once and
I nfiert TinflroHrin to be anked to
extend it* Powell and Polk
street* line*.
A complete municipal* railway sys
tem to afford adequate transportation
to th« Panama-Pacific exposition was
the solution of the traffic problem de
l«d upon yesterday by the super
-sors , public utiHt'y committee in joint
S'Hsion with t , ? exposition directors
and the state harbor commission.
City Engineer O'Shaughnessy will be
railed upon as a result of the action]
?*kon to prepare plans and speoiflca- !
I ns embracing all the lines which the j
city must build to reach the fair
grounds, lie will also give an estimate
of the cost of the proposed railways and
of the time it will take to complete
them.
The entire question -will then be sub
mitted to the people in the form of a
bond election to provide funds for the
big undertaking.
HARBOR BOARD TO BUILD LI>E
Harbor Commissioner Dwyer an
nounced, amid applause, that the state
harbor board would provide a double
track surface line along the water
front from the ferry to the fair
grounds, and permit the city to con
struct an elevated railroad over vir
tually the same route. Hβ suggested
a temporary wooden structure, which it
was estimated, could be built for ap
proximately 1200.000, since only the
portion traversing the lower and con
gested levels would need to be ele
vated.
Another plan promised to solve a
large portion of the transportation dif
ficulties was suggested by Supervisor
Mauzy, providing for a "municipal
short line" running from a central sta
tion at Hamilton square through the
propoped Fillmore street tunnel to a
point inside the fair grounds.
TrtANSrORTATION" IP TO CITY
It was decided by the supervisors
♦ hat since the charter, by reason of the
defeat of amendment No. 34, prevents
t lie granting of indeterminate fran
i hispp. the United Railroads can not
*xtr-nd its system, and that it is there
fore incumbent upon the city to pro
vide transportation facilities to the
fair.
The construction of many different
lines was proposed and suggested dur
ing the meeting, which was held at the
city hall. All these plans will be placed
in the hands of the city engineer.
'J lie decision to call upon Mr.
«• Sha to prepare plans for the
Continued ou Paare 2. Column 4
THE CALL
"The People's Newspaper ,,
j Routes From Military Bases in United States to Mexico and Army and Navy Officials
INTERVENTION WILL COME
ONLY IN DIRE NECESSITY
President Holds Army and Transportation
Ready for Invasion of Mexico
tSperial Dispatch to The Call*
WASHINGTON*, Feb. 12.—The situa
tion in Mexico continues to be the oc
casion of the gravest anxiety to the
administration.
"While the reports are meager, they
indicate a wanton disregard on the part
of both Madero and Diaz, for the lives
and property of foreigners and Mexi
can noncombatants.
On the other hand, intervention in
Mexico would be projected warfare
and a sacrifice of blqod and treasure
far beyond the realization of man, and
only dire necessity will impel the
president to take a step in that di
rection.
That the crisis may be reached to
morrow is the belief of those who are
in close touch with the situation. It
earnestly is hoped it will be of a
character which will obviate any ne
cessity for intervention.
While developments and more ac
curate news will be awaited before
any definite plan is decided upon by
the administration, it is quite possible
that unless there is a cessation of the
wanton destruction of lives and pro
perty in the City of Mexico, the presi
dent will feel compelled to send to
congress a special message dealing:
with the situation.
The president's patience and nonin
tervention policy have been severely
strained by the developments of the
past few days and although he is still
loath to involve the United States in
so grave an undertaking as an Inva
sion of Mexico, he may be forced to
put the matter up to congress.
XBWS FROM MEXICO SCARCE
It is believed here that the scarcity
of news from Mexico is due to Ma
dero's having cut. the telegraph wires
pretty generally over the republic
with a view to preventing his troops
in the provinces from learning of any
success which may attend the efforts
of Diaz and themselves turning against
the Madero government.
The feeling is strong that Madero
has pretty conclusively demonstrated
his incompetence to conduct the affairs
of Mexico and news of a sweeping vic
tory by Diaz probably would be
greeted with a feeling of intense re-
SAN FRANCISCO,. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 8.
lief, although those In official posi
tion naturally are chary of express
ing their views.
When the situation in Mexico be
came acute last fall President Taft in
dicated in the event of a crisis de
manding drastic measures he would
refer the problem to congress. When
he departed from Washington for
Philadelphia this evening he was still
hopeful that the United States would
not be forced to interfere, although
he had made it plain that he would
not tolerate the sacrificing of foreign
lives in the battle for political su
premacy.
In Washington the president left
Secretaries Knox and Stimson on the
lid and he will be constantly within
reach of them by telephone until hie
return early tomorrow morning.
TROOPS UNDER WAITING ORDERS
Under orders issued today the lirst
brigade of the first division of the
new army organization is resting on
its arms, ready to entrain for Newport
News within a few hours after the
word was given here.
Transports also have been put in comm
ission to carry this force, number
ing about 3,000 men, including auxil
iaries, to Mexican waters. Prepara
tions have been made to mobilize 2,500
marines from the Atlantic fleet and
the Guantanamo naval station in Vera
Cruz for any emergency.
Nearly all the reports received by
the department of state today were
disquieting.
One of the latest messages was from
Consul Alonzo B. Garrett in Laredo,
Tex. It read:
"Battle opened in Mexico City at 0
this morning. Heavy artillery and ma
chine guns used on both sides.
"Property loss very heavy from yes
terday's cannonading. Fierce lighting-
In vicinity of federal telegraph otßcß,
and operators have left their stations.
"All wires down south of Monterey,
and communication from Laredo to
Monterey only via Mier."
AMBASSADOR IX CHARGE
Xo detailed confirmation has, been
received from Ambassador Wilson, and.
Continued on Page 3, Column 1
FUNERAL OF MOTHER
DOESN'T STOP WEDDING
IVnnnylvenia Girl Become* Bride In
Garment Worn nt Services
Same Day
(Special Dispatch to The Callj
DANVILLE, Pa., Feb. 12.—Immedi
ately after her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth
Crumb, was buried here Miss Sophia
Crumb was married to Frank E. Me-
Arran of this place. The bride ex
plained that the wedding had been set
for this afternoon and that she did not
desire to change it, she having a be
lief that postponed weddings are un-
lucky. The contract was performed in
the parlor of the home, where a few
minutes before the coffin with her
mother's corpse had stood. The gar
ment she wore at the funeral was her
wedding gown.
NEW YORK RAO PICKER
FINDS RICH "PICKINGS"
Stocks and Bonds Worth *100,000 Found
in Trunk With Musty
Papers
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK. Feb. 12.—The discovery
of stocks and bonds having a face value
of $100,000 in a trunk filled with old
papers was made recently by an East
Side rag picker, according to William
and Herman Silverman, attorneys at 90
Nassau street, who announced today
that they had instituted a search for
the heirs of General Daniel C. McCal
lum, to whom the certificates belonged.
ZERO MARK IN CHICAGO
Cold Wave Kills One and Causes Suf
fering Among Poor
(Special Dispatch to The Cain
CHICAGO, Feb. 12.—The . return of
zero weather caused one death and
much suffering to thousands of the
city's poor today. An unexpected cold
wave from the northwest sent the ther
mometer down to the zero mark.
SUFFRAGETTES BURN HALL
LONDON. Feb. 12.—The refreshment
hall In Regent's park, London, was
burned today by militant suffragettes.
The women left no clew to their iden
tity, but on an adjoining" path the
words "Votes for Women" yew found
scratched in the graveL r
i "An Indenen/ient Newsoaoer?*
NEW ERA DAWNS IN
EMPIRE OF JAP Ah
Emperor No Longer Regarded
Immortal, Declares Leader in
Parliament; Rioting Continues
TOKYO, Feb. 12.—Rioting and blood
shed, attending the sudden fall of the
Katsura ministry, have spread from
Tokyo to Osaka. A revolution greater
than any event in the political history
of Japan since the restoration is in
progress.
When the Osaka police attempted to
break up a meeting of the constitution
alists a mob formed and attacked the
newspapers favorable to Katsura, Hot
fighting between the mob and the edi
torial and mechanical staffs ensued and
several were killed.
Startling indication of change of po
litical thought came today when for
mer Mayor Ozaki of Tokyo, a. member
of parliament, declared in a passionate
speech the emperor is a mortal and not
free from error. It was disloyal, he
said, for Katsura to. hide behind the
venerated figure of the emperor to avoid
responsibility.
Hitherto the Japanese have conceived
the emperor to be immortal and above
the power of human frailty.
FAIR BILL WILL NOT
PASS AT THIS SEASON
Iloufir Sidetracks Measure to Provide
92,000,000 for Uncle Sam's Build.
lujc at Exposition
WASHINGTON, Feb. 12.—The bill to
provide |2,000,000 for government par
ticipation in the Panama-Pacific ex
position in 1915 at San Francisco was
killed for this session of congress by
action of the house today on a test
vote of 112 to 117 in a parliamentary
skirmish for closing debate.
The action followed several hours
of maneuvering with many roll calls.
Representative Hefflin of Alabama, In
charge of the measure, said there was
no hope of bringing up the matter in
the house again, although it might
be possible for it to be covered In an
amendment to the sundry civil bill in
the senate.
One of the principal objections to
the measure was the provision for
seven commlesioners at $7,500/ a year
each, to be paid, along with their
traveling expenses, by. the exposition
company. Opponents of the* bill said
this provision wu designed to facili
tate its passage through, the-house,
Illajfim JJftfcj lin i Ywrterdaj-, e2» loww* T«f»d»y
Si£ht t 44. B>»r detail* of the Mfither *** page IX-
Francisco Has
» f \ y == =====
widiin 40 minutes' ride the State
with 4,728 students,
g **** second in size only to Columbia.
DIAZ APPEARS TO MOLD
SLIGHT ADVANTAGE OVER
FORCES OF GOVERNMENT
Schrapnel Sweeps Streets Leading to Positions Occupied
by Madero Troops, Dealing Destruction to Valuable
Property, and Mowing Down Human Beings by
the Score—Two American Women Are Killed
in Their Homes—Beautiful City Is Devastated and
Its Inhabitants Are Overcome by Terror—Embassy
of the United States Is the Refuge of Foreigners
PRESIDENT OF WAR RIDDEN REPUBLIC
PROMISES TO END REBELLION TODAY
• BULLETIN
MEXICO CITY, Feb. 12 (midnight). — lt is estimated that close upon
800 were fci//e</ and 1,500 more or less seriously wounded in todays fight
ing here.
BULLETIN
LAREDO, Tex., Feb. 12.— Reports to the National raUroai offices here
tonight are that rebels burned the Colonia station of that line in Mexico City,
a magnificent structure, valued at $400,000. The station was near the center
of the city, not far from the American colony.
MEXICO CITY, Feb. 12.—Mexico's capital was torn asunder
again today by shot and shell.
It was not until 9 o'clock that the fire ceased in all quarters.
General Felix Diaz, in command of the rebel forces, fortified and
entrenched in and around the arsenal, held his ground against the
federals.
He did more than this.
He subjected the city to a more terrible bombardment than that
of yesterday, enlarged his zone of action and sent forces against the
national palace.
But tonight Madero was optimistic.
Throughout the bomardment and the almost continuous rattle
of machine guns and rifles, the president went about hi» work in the
palace apparently unperturbed.
His courage v/as great, his confidence remarkable. At the
arsenal General Diaz calmly directed the operations. He character-
them as solely defensive. He, too, was optimistic.
DEAD AND WOUNDED GREAT
The number of dead and wounded can not even be estimated, but ii
large. For two hours this morning the rebel gunners rained shot and shell
at the lofty structures of the city, from the roofs of which federal sharp
shooters and machine gun men had attempted to rake the insurgents in the
trenches and behind the barricades of the arsenal.
The shells from the heavy guns were well timed, the explosions throwing
thousands of bullets over the roofs, effectually clearing these buildings for a
time at least of the picked federal troops.
Some of the rebels' shells and not a few rifle bullets reached the national
palace, but none did serious damage. It is not believed that Diaz seriously
contemplates at the present time an attack on Madero's headquarters.
Madero has promised to make a combined assault on the rebel position
tomorrow, but the operations of today indicate that Diaz' strength has not
been fully shown.
On the first day of the battle it was the government forces that burned
their powder.
Today it was the rebels' turn to be aggressive.
Diaz brought forth heavier guns than he had used before.
ZAPATISTAS APPEAR AS MENACE
Pwo threatening features of the day were the appearance in the, outskirts
city of Zapatistas, who harassed the government troops, and the release
the Belem jail of several thousand prisoners. Some of the latter have
joined the rebel ranks, but others are footfree and may turn to looting.
The American ambassador and the ministers of Great Britain, Germany
and Spain made protests to both Madero and Diaz against the "barbarous
and inhuman warfare," but their pro-"
tests have been in vain.
A brief armistice was arranged for
a visit of the diplomats to the presi
dent and to the rebel commander, but
the continuity of the fighting was in
terrupted but slightly. The staccato
note of the machine guns seldom was
silent and there was at no time a long
interval between the roars of the
cannon.
The British legation was under the
rebel fire for a time, but the American
embassy is considered to be In a com
paratively safe district.
On this account the women and chil
dren are being brought to that section,
where an American guard protects
them.
In a lull in the fighting, automobiles
flying the -white flag were sent to the
various quarters of the city by the
Americans, Germans and British to col
lect the women and children of all
nationalities. They •will be housed in
the buildings around the American
embassy.
FIRING LESSENS AFTER DARK
At 8:30 tonight the firing lessened.
Only, at rare intervals did the- booming
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
of a cannon remind the people that the
conflict had not ended.
In their positions the federal soldiers
are resting on their arms. Here and
there small squads have secured liquor
|wr STRAIGHT
DISTILLED BT
GREENBRIER DISTILLERY CO.
Kelson C ounty, Ky.
CHARLES MEINCCKE & Cβ.
l—mlMMWOlttTi tf ff ri 1~~ * Ti

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