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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 26, 1913, Image 1

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HieheM Tpinv'TnOirr «0; I.ovmt Mondar
>lgh«. 42. For <]i-tntl« of the Weather nee page 15.
THE BIG SMOKESTACK EDITION
of The Call issued Sunday can be
mailed to any part of the United States
FOR 7 CENTS POSTAGE
For foreign countries 13c Is required.
VOLUME (XIII.—NO. 88.
RAILROAD BOARD
OF CALIFORNIA
HALTS UNMERGING
Kruttschnitt Declares if De-i
cision of Railroad Com-*
mission Is Upheld It j
Means the Submission ofj
Another Plan—Attorney j
General Regards Action i
as a Purely Local Matter j
UNION PACIFIC MAN
SAYS NO AMENDMENT
Local Southern Pacific Offi
cers Assert That Further
Consideration Must Come
From the East and Wait
for Statement by Judge
Lovett—Every One at Sea
Pending Decision by Court
Harriman Men Gloomy
Western Pacific Rejoices
California decSsion local matter,
ways attorney general. Jfo
change in plnn of government.
Inlon Pacific attorney says hie
nystrm will submit no amend
ment*.
Kruttwchnitt says plan "coee by
the board" if court uphold* Cal
ifornia railroad commission.
Further consideration must come
from the east, say local rail
road officials.
Verdict of commissioner* signal
victory for people, declares
WentWß Pacific attorney.
General Manaser Nchlnaeks re
jolees over decision with re
spect to its future effects.
Circuit court has matter under
advisement at St. I.outs.
v ......■......■.«.■■■.. ..... u
ST. LOUIS, Feb. -s—The order of the
California railroad commission denying
the application of the Union Pacific
railway for a 999 year lease of the
Benicia cutoff between Oakland, Ca-1.,
and Sacramento will not affect the
government's plan for the dissolution
of the Union Pacific-Southern Pacific
merger. Attorney General Wickersham
said today.
"The California decision," said Mr.
"Wiekersham, "is a local matter, and
the government plan for the dissolution
will not be changed."
Other attorneys who argued the ds- !
solution .-are before the federal court
for the district of Utah here yesterday
refused to discuss the matter. John G
Milburn, counsel for the Union Pacific,
however, stated that the matter would
not again come before the court, there
by indicating that the Union Pacific
would not submit an amendment to its
}>lan.
The dissolution plan is now under
consideration by the three circuit
judges who heard the arguments yes
terday.
Plans May Fall Through
NEW YORK, Feb. 25.— Julius Krutt-
Bchnftt, chairman of the Southern Pa
cific company, said today that the
Union Pacific-Southern Pacific dissolu
-1 k>n p'ai would "go by the board," and
that a new plan would have to be
• • olved should the courts uphold the
ision of the California state railroad
inmission, rendered at San Francisco
Bterd&y.
"If the decision of the California
etate railroad commission is upheld by
the circuit court at St. Louis," reads a
formal statement issued by Mr. Krutt
schnitt, '"the Union Pacific-Southern
Pacific dissolution plan goes by the
: rd, and negotiations will have to pm
l< gun all over again from the besin
■.a;. It means an entirely new plan
ill have to be evolved. The commis
n's decision includes many con
ditions which the Union Pacific has all
along been unable to accept and which
the Southern Pacific In turn has found
impossible also to accept."'
j7ntire matter may
Ij go back to court
"Further consideration of the iin
merging of the Central. Union and
Southern Pacific railroads must come
from the east," was the decision yes
terday of the 10-al officials of the
Southern Pacific company in dealing
with the decision of the state board of
railroad commissioners Monday night.
"The verdict is a signal victory not
only for San Francisco, but all of
Mfornia," declares Charles S. Wheeler,
attorney for the Western Pacific com
ny, who successfully presented that
ompany's protest against approval of
the findings sanctioned by the attor
ney general of the United States.
Julius Kruttschnitt, chairman of the
board of directors of the Southern Pa
# cific company, notified the local offices
that if the decision of the California
emission is upheld by the circuit
• >vi t of St. Louis the negotiations
would have to go by the board and an
Continued on Page 4, Column 1
THE SAN FRANCISCO CALL
"The People's Newspaper"
SUICIDE RECORDS
DETAILS OF DEATH
Instrument Maker Dies fcp Device
Which Permits Him to Feel
Oncoming
fSr*r!al Pfsnntrh to The Cell)
PHILADELPHIA. Feb. 23.—"With a
stethoscope fastened to his ear and a
tiny steel lance made by himself em
bedded in his heart, Karl Schneyder, an
instrument maker at 20S South Elev
enth street, was found dead, a suicide,
by his wife and a friend today.
The man had calmly resolved to die.
Familiar through years of manufactur- j
Ing instruments used in surgery, he
determined to lise his last moments to
feel the oncoming , of death.
He lay down on a couch, placed the
stethoscope on his ear?, then took the
lance and slowly started it working
toward his heart. As the lance thread
ed its way through the flesh and mus
cle the man could hear tho heart beats
ns they throbbed their way through the
delicately adjusted instrument that
registered their pulsations. As calmly
as if death were the last thought in
his mind, the man stabbed himself
through the heart.
OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN
IS MARRIED BY REPORT
j name Rumor Does Xot Xanie Bride,
\or Hits lieutenant Heard
Wedding Bells
J (Special IMspateh to the Call)
NEW YORK, Feb. 25.—Report had It
along Broadway this afternoon that
Oscar Hammerstein, who was divorced
by his wife about one year ago, had
been secretly married. The name of
the new Mrs. Hammerstein was not
disclosed. At the Hammerstein offices
in the Victoria theater the report could
not be confirmed.
Neither Hammerstein nor his sons,
Arthur and William, could be found.
Mr. Levy of the Hammerstein staff,
when questioned about the report, said
that it was news to him.
"I am pretty certain that the story
is not true," he said. "If Mr. Ham
merstein was married I probably
would have heard of it, but until the
report of this afternoon 1 have never
heard that he was contemplating mat
rimony."
WOMAN ELECTROCUTED
BY MASSAGE VIBRATOR
Appliance Forms Conductor and Kills
Unfortunate While She Iβ
Taking Her Bath
DES MOIXES, la., Feb. 25.—While
bathing at her home here this after
noon Mrs. E. B. Austin, wife of a
prominent business man, was electro
cuted bj- a "massage vibrator,' , which
she had been using.
The body was discovered by her 9
year old daughter when she returned
from school. It was partly submerged,
and a deep burn across the breast and
neck caused Coroner Lee to decide that
death was due to shock from the
vibrator.
It is believed the water formed a
conductor and sent the electric cur
rent through her body.
SHERIFF'S OFFICE LOOTED
Chicago BnrKlnrs Overlook Only
What's Tied Down
(Spcinl Dispatch to Ttie Call)
CHICAGO, Feb. 25.—Burglars forced
entrance to the criminal court build
ing and looted the sheriff's office early
today. Bonds for bail totaling $50,000
were stolen, together with gold
watches, gold stars, money, handcuffs
and even leg irons. The desks of 50
deputies were broken into and the
door of the vault wrecked. Five hun
dred subpenas, made out for the sum
moning of witnesses, also were taken.
EGG PRICES ARE FALLING
Re»t Petaluma Product Selling at Low-
ent In Yearn
The best Petaluma eggs are selling
to tradesmen for 18 cents and 19 cents
a dozen in the local wholesale market,
the prices being the lowest for a num
ber of years. The outlook Is favor
able for still lower quotations. The
supply is far in excess of market re
quirements, and hesitancy on the part
of wholesalers to commence storing is
responsible for the low prices.
COLD CUTS STRIKE SHORT
Silk Operative* Return to Work
Rather Than shlvrr la
the Streets
PATERBON, X J., Feb. 25.—1t was
so cold here today that 5,000 striking
silk operators who quit work this
morning in various mills went back to
their machines rather than shiver in
the streets. The mill owners said they
were running with full forces.

NORA BAYES TO WED AGAIN
Once Champion Happy Married Womaa
tv Ilepcat Experience
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
NEW YORK. Feb. 25.—There Iβ a
strong rumor around Broadway that
Nora Bayes, the actress, 'who recently
divorced her doting and admiring hus
band, Jack Norworth, in Chicago, coon
will be married to Al Fields, the
vaudeville player.
ANOTHER AVIATOR KILLED
German Airman Drops 200 Feet to
Death at Hangelnr
COLfOGNE, Germany, Feb. 25.—
Bruno Werntgen, an aviator, fell to
day from a height of 200 feet at
Hangelar, near Bonn, and. was killed.
n
SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, 'FEBRUARY 26, 1913.—PAGES 1 TO 10.
CARDINAL GIBBONS
BLESSES 'HIKERS'
OF SUFFRAGISTS
"General" Rosalie Jones and
Doughty Army Invade
Venerable Prelate's Home
Without Warning
Dispatch to The Call)
BALTIMORE, Feb. 25.—James Car
dinal Gibbons, prince primate of the
Roman Catholic church, today blessed
the little "On to "Washington" army
of suffragette "hikers."
"You are modern Joans of Arc. God
bless you," said the cardinal. And an
Knglish "militant" in the army con
fessed that she could hardly resist the
temptation to kiss the venerable pre
late.
Continued on Po£C 3, Column 4
U.S. RECOGNIZES
FRIEDMANN CURE
FOR TUBERCULOSIS
Young German Physician
Consents to Give Quan
tity of Bacilli to the
Government
XEW YORK. Feb. 25.—The United
States government took official recog
nition of the claim of Dr. Frederick F.
Friedmann to the discovery of a cure
for tuberculosis when, by the order of
the surgeon general, a physician of
the United States marine hospital
service, Dr. Milton H. Foster, was sent
to meet the young German physician
on his arrival here today aboard the
steamship Kronprinzessin Cecilie.
At the request of the government
surgeon, Doctor Friedmann consented
to turn over a quantity of his bacilli
to be tested by the government and
to demonstrate the efficiency of his
cure before physicians of the hospital
service.
Doctor Frledmann, who comes to this
country at the invitation of Charles E.
Finlay, a Ts'ew York banker, who hopes
the physician will be able to cure his
son in law of the disease, tonight said
that his remedy was not a secret and
that he purposed to make known "to
all the world" the method by which it
was created and the manner in which
it vnut administered. It consisted of
Mcilli taken from a turtle into which
tubercular bacilli from a human being
had been injected, he explained.
ALL FORMS ARK CI'REU
"I have been working upon the cure
for 14 years and in the last two and a
half years I have treated from 2,500 to
3,000 patients," he asserted. "How
many I have absolutely cured I can not
estimate, but their number has run
into the hundreds. The remedy cures
all forms of tuberculosis except such
cases as are quite hopeless—that is,
on the point of death. The process is
a slew one, but the first effects are to
be seen two or three weeks after in
noeulation. The time when an abso
lute cure can be said to be effected is a
matter of months. The method of ad
ministering is 50 per cent of the cure.
"I want all mankind to benefit by my
discovery. I already have turned over
some of my bacilli to the German gov
ernment and I am very glad to turn it
over to the American government."
L>K\ll-:s OFFER OF MILLION
Doctor Friedmann denied that he had
been offered $1,000,000 by Mr. Finlay !f
he would cure 95 out of 100 patients in
Continued on Page 2, Column 3
EMILIO MADERO, BROTHER OF DEPOSED
PRESIDENT, REPORTED TO HAVE BEEN
SLAIN; MONTEREY TELEGRAPHS DENIAL
Infantry pitching shelter tents on the Presidio golf links (upper), and soldiers engaged in loading one of the
mule pack wagons preparatory to taking the field (lower picture).
MRS. JOHN K. TURNER'S PLEA
Editor San Francisco Call: My husband, Mr. Turner, has been arrested the
second time in Mexico City because he dared to protest against the outrage of his de
tention in the arsenal on February 19.
Mr. Turner is not a Maderist nor an adherent of any faction whatever in
Mexico. He is simply observing the situation from a writer's point of view, as a cor
respondent would observe it. His detention is an outrage that should arouse all
American citizens who care for their international honor into violent protest.
Please make this known through your newspaper, and I will be eternally grate
ful to you.
I have protested to President Taft by telegraph. Most sincerely yours,
MRS. JOHN KENNETH TURNER.
Carmel, California, February 25, 1913.
WIFE OF SENATOR
BOURNE SAID TO
HAVE LEFT HIM
Departure of Oregon Solon's
Helpmeet for West Stirs
Washington, Reviving
Old Scandal
(Sp«v*inl Pispntrh to Ttse Call)
WASHINGTON. Feb. 25.—Mrs. Jona
than Bourne, wife of the senator
from Oregon, it is declared tonight,
took French leave of her husband to
day, departing for Oregon and inti
mating that she would bring action
for divorce and would name an attrac
tive young woman, an employe of the
senate, as corespondent. Senator
Bourne admitted this evening that his
■wife had packed her lares and penates
and departed for Oregon, but beyond
that he would not discuss the report
which occasioned so much interesting
gossip at the capitoL
Senator and Mrs. Bourne live at
Stoneleigh, but, it is said, have occu
pied separate apartments for some
time—ever since, in fact, Mrs. Bourne
returned from an extended trip in
Europe. Mrs. Bourne's departure to
day was unannounced so far as her
friends were concerned, and the inci
dent has set all the tongues in Wash
ington wagging, and some interesting
and lurid anecdotes of the senator's
career as a Lothario, most of which
will be taken by the more conservative
as highly imaginative, are being re-
Continued om Page 3, Column S ,
"An Independent Newspaper"
PRESIDIO GARRISON
MOBILIZED BY ORDER
OF WAR DEPARTMENT
Two Regiments of Infantry, Four Troops of
Cavalry and Signal Corps Company
Stand Ready to Entrain
With their entire field equipment
packed, the two regiments of infantry,
four troops of cavalry and one com
pany of signal corps, stationed at the
Presidio, today stand ready to entrain
for the Mexican border on a moment's
notice.
Tropical clothing, field rations and 90
rounds of ball ammunition have been
issued to each soldier, and 100 army
wagons fully loaded with tentage and
forage are waiting In the corrals.
Under orders from the war depart
ment the entire garrison, consisting of
2,400 men, was mobilized yesterday
morning and placed on a war footing.
An emergency camp was established
and every man was thoroughly in
spected by officers of General Murray's
staff.
The shrill note of "Call to Arms"
rang out over the Presidio shortly be
fore 7 o'clock.
OHDER OUT OF COXFVSION
Soldiers hastened to their quarters
for thetr arms and equipment and offi
cers buckled on their side arms. Every
thing appeared In confusion, but out of
the disorder companies, battalions and
regiments of Uncle Sam's fighting men
were formed ready for any emergency.
Mule trains were rushed from the
corrals to the barracks, where tentage,
forage and rations were quickly stored
•board. There was one wagon to each,
FORECAST i
uortll «md». changing to ■onfhTveM.
' ' ' ■' a 1"
_JE|oost j£i Every Copy
-• If you haven't done so already, send a
copy of the big; annual edition of The Call
—the Smokestack Edition—to your
friends back East. It is good California
publicity.
dlers for 10 days. In the cavalry
wagons was an extra allowance of hay
Hardly had the notes of the trump
eter ceased, than the soldiers began
shouting. "Tv Mexico, t<> Mexico, hoo
ray:' , Theory was taken up from one
barrack to another, and soon the 2,400
troopers were giving voice while they
hurriodly went about their tasks.
SIRE IT WAS "ON TO MEXICO"
Every one at the post wa3 sure it
was "on to Mexico." The order came
as a surprJee, but it found no one want-
Ing. It proved conclusively that the
army of Uncle Sam, no matter if it is
small, is surely efficient.
Exactly 45 minutes after the order
had been received the several thousand
fully equipped flghting men were step
ping it off over the dusty roads to the
westerly part of the post. The morn
ing carried with it a slight chill and a
thin, white fog hung down over the
green slopes, but the "boys" were re
sponding to a test call for action, and
little did. they care of the weather.
They believed they were going , to fight
and see real action and all they wanted
was their own Springfield rifle, ample
Continued on. Pave 3, Column 5
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TROOPS LDTAL TO
WITH OVERTAKE
HUNTED FUGITIVE
With Escort of Thirty-five
Men, Victim Was At
tempting to Reach Laredo
—Uncertainty Whether
He Was Killed in Action
or Captured and Executed
MEXICO IN FEAR
OF A TEXAN RAID
Bl LLETIX
LAREDO, Texan, Feb. 2.*5.— A tele
crrmii received here late tonight from
Monterey denied that Einilio Madero
bad been ahot near that cltj-, an re
ported In v <lis|i:il<h from Mexico City.
Everything In quiet In the vicinity of
'■ Monterey, according to the dlapntch.
(Si*>«ial Dispatch to The Cain
MEXICO ClTi', Feb. 25.—Emilio Mα
dero, a brother of the deposed president,
has been shot and killed north of Mon
terey, according to reliable information
received here.
"With an escort of 35 men Madero, It
is said, was attempting to join the
rebels holding Laredo when he was
overtaken by tl- ops sent by General
Trevino. The reports do not indicate
whether Madero was killed in action
or was executed.
The shooting of Madero took place
between Villadama and Bastamente.
BEGAN COI.\TER REVOLUTION
Emillo Madero, in conjunction with
his brother Raoul, began a counter
revolution at San Ped.-o, in the state of
Coahuiia, a few days ago, in the ex
pectation of uniting the rebels about
with those in the Laredo dis
trict. "
Fear of a Texan raid of reprisal ami
displeasure over the strong revival of
pro-Diaz sentiment were exhibited to
day by Provisional President Victori
ano Huerta, who is busily organizing
his own campaign for the presidency.
Huerta has issued frenzied warnings
to federalists and rebels in Matamoras
to abstain from any act which might
precipitate a clash with the Texas state
authorities.
Rebels and federalists seem more
concerned over the militant attitude of
Governor Colquitt of Texas than the
representations of the United States
state department or the proximity of a
full division of United States troops to
the border.
DIAZ' PORTRAIT RETURXED
The return of the portrait of Por
flrio Diaz to the national palace, whence
(as from other public buildings) por
traits of the old dictator had been ban
ished by Madero, was accomplished
with determination by the more mili
tant Diaz faction.
The latter were willing enough to
profit by the support of the followers
of the old regime, but they fear now
that either Porflrio Diaz may return
and displace them from power or that
the animosity of the Maderista and
other anti-Huerta parties will be in
flamed to such a pitch that the Huerta
following will be caught between two
millstones and ground to pieces.
The assassination of Juan Sanchez
Azcona, private secretary to Madero,
has caused all surviving close associ
ates of the murdered president and vice
president to flee from the capital.
AMERH\A.\S BEAT OFF BANDITS
A thrilling account of how a number
of Americans, employes of the Conti
nental Rubber company, fought off a
besieging force of more than 200 Mex
ican bandits near Charco, state of
Zacatecas, was told today in a dispatch
to the company's office here.
Attacked by the bandits, who de-
WITH
AFTERNOON TEA
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