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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, February 27, 1913, Image 1

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ITfsrfcest Tpmpprittnrf Teirt*rflay. K4; I<ow*Bt Tne*day
Might, 4e. For details of the Weather see pes:* , tr».
THE BIG SMOKESTACK EDITION
of The Call Issued Sunday can be
mailed to any part of the United States
FOR 7 CENTS POSTAGE
For foreign countries 13c is required.
VOLUME CXIIL—NO. 89.
GOULD RAILROAD
WILL SOON HAVE
TERMINAL ON BAY
Traffic Agreement With the
Northern Electric Gives
Western Pacific Access to
Deep Water at Vallejo by
Short Route — Contract
With Pacific Navigation
Co. Has Fallen Through
FEEDERS CAN REACH
TWO RICH VALLEYS
' Southern Pacific Officials Are
Still Reticent on Unscram
bling Matter, Awaiting
Action of Court — Trans
fer of the Portland and
San Francisco Steamship
Company Consummated
Wielding of the "big stick" over
the head of the Gould roads did not
prevent, as has been generally under
stood, so far as the public Is con
cerned, the formation of a traffic agree
ment between the Northern Electric
Railroad company and the Western Pa
cific Railway company.
Within a comparatively short time,
throngh Its recently acquired connec
tions with the Vallejo and Northern
Rlectrlc, the Western Pacific will soon
hare another terminal on San Francisco
bay at Vallejo, that will at least give
it access to deep water by a greatly
shortened route, and the two lines will
be able to form an offset that even the
Benicia Short can not very suc
cessfully overcome.
The recent hearing before the rail
road commissioners that checked the
so called Harriman "unscrambling"
brought to light some important facts
I regarding the Northern Electric and Its
intentions that probably otherwise
o'jld have gone unnoticed.
-AN PEDRO BOTTLED IP
The fact was elicited yesterday, 'n
■ition to development of the North- j
Electric scheme for betterment,]
t the proposed contract between the
■•iflc Navigation company, operating
the steamers Yale and Harvard, had
lerh because it was lmpos
ir any line to operate In compe
tition at the San Pedro terminals *n
opposition to the Southern Pacific com
pany, which, through its allies, the
P&cifte Electric and the San Pedro and
Halt Lake railroad, lias practically "bot
tled up" the port of L,os Angeles.
The Pacific Navigation company has
a contract with the San Pedro and Salt
or Clark line, for the handling of
passengers between the port of Los
Angeles and the city of Los Angeles, .27
miles distant.
TRAFFIC AGREEMENT MADE
The Northern Electric has entered
into a traffic agreement, at the instiga
tion of the raiiroad commissioners,
with the Western Pacific. The North
ern Electric taps a great hay pro
ducing region and had to get its
freight to the San Francisco market.
As the matter stands, strengthened
by the view of the railroad commission
regarding the use of terminals and of
the Benicia cut off, the Western Fa
ciflc. through an agreement that it has
with the Northern Electric, and the
later railroad through the control it
has acquired of the Vallejo and North
ern, will within one year have an
entirely Independent deep water ter
minal in San Francisco bay, in ad
..dition to the one it already has at the
Oakland estuary entrance.
The Vallejo and Northern will have
a Vallejo frontage sufficient for all
its purposes and will give the Western
Pacific railroad not only a harbor ter
minal on a fair and equal basis with
it, but will provide feeders that will
tap both the San Joaquin and Sacra
mento valleys.
COUTHERN PACIFIC
O OFFICIALS QUIET
The Southern Pacific railroad officials
are not giving any information to the
public regarding the probable rescram
bling- of the Central, Union and South
ern Pacific railroads as result of the
■ decision of the state railroad
commission. officials in New York
yesterday informed the local officers
hey would await the action of
the (Jolted States circuit court in St.
Louis and make no move until that
decision shall have been recorded.
The transfer of the local offices of
the Portland and San Francisco Steam
i> company from this city to Port
d wag consummated, so far as ar
rangements are concerned, yesterday
afternoon. J. P. O'Brien, vice pres
ident and General Manager of the
Oregon and Washington Railway and
Navigation company, is at the Palace
hotel and has had charge of the trans
fer.
G. X Blair, general manager of the
i ompany, will succeed R. P. Schwerin.
The transfer will not in any way effect
the volume at businas* in this port.
"The People's Newspaper"
REVOLUTIONS ARE MENACING HUERTA
Zapata With His Guerilla Force Is Within Thirty Miles of Capital
FIRST AUTHENTIC PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN IN MEXICO CITY ON SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9, AT START OF THE REVOLUTION.
The remarkable scene in front of the palace in Mexico City, at 4 o'clock on Sunday, February 9 (upper picture). Under the canopy in the center, indicated by
an arrow, is President Madero making a desperate effort to talk to the people, who are not paying much attention to him. Mounted police can be seen pleading with
the crowd to disperse, as word had just been received that Generals Reyes and Diaz are about to commence the mutiny. Shortly after this picture was taken the battle
began, hundreds in the Zocola (the square) were shot down and a frightful stampede followed. Below are shown the Tlalpan cadets, who started the revolution.
The picture shows the cadets following General Diaz and General Reyes, who demanded the surrender of the troops guarding the palace. It was during this fight that
General Reyes was killed and many of the cadets killed and wounded by the fire of the federal troops from the palace.
VOLUNTEER FIRE
FIGHTERS SAVE
TOWN OF JACKSON
Business Section Is Partly
Destroyed and Several
Have Narrow Escapes
With Lives
(Special Dispatch to The C«I1)
JACKSON. Feb. 26.—The business
district of Jackson was menaced by
fire this morning. The blaze origi
nated in the building owned by Mrs.
C. C. Ginocchio and spread rapidly.
One large building was destroyed
and several others damaged.
Mr. and Mrs. David Robinson, their
two children and Mrs. Eva Froelich and
her young son narrowly escaped from
the building in which they had their
home. #
They had barely reached the street
when the floor fell Into the burning
store below.
bosses ar?:
Mrs. C. C. Ginocchio, building, $2,000;
George Dorman, dry goods, $1,200;
• Mrs. Louis Tellier, building, $1,800;
I Robinson & Froelich, restaurant, $1,800;
I Marucci & Balluonini, saloon, $200;
Mace Estate company, building, $75;
Dr. Blake Franklin, office fixtures, $250;
J. B. Palmer, photograph supplies,
$150; Dr. S. W. Schattich, dental office
fixtures, $50.
Efficient work of the volunteer fire
men saved the business district from
total destruction. The cause of the
fire has not been determined.
STORM IN SOUTHLAND
IS WORTH $20,000,000
Secretary of Low Angelen Chamber of
Commerce Saym Nature Has Paid
for Recent Frosts
(Rpoclal Dlspntdi to The Call)
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 26.—"This rain
will give southern California at least
$20,000,000 worth of benefit to crops.
In this manner nature is squaring ac
counts with the citrus rancher, restor
ing the loss she took in the recent col<i
wave. Splendid will be crops' yield this
season."
This was the comment of Frank Wig
gins, secretary of the Chamber of Com
merce, aftar he had talked with ranch
ers from all over the southern section.
The heavy fall of rain ceased early
last night, but began again this after
noon. 1 r.s forecast Is for showers, to
morrow. The precipitation was 7.14
inches.
WHITE CAT CAUSES DEATH
Sudden Appearance Frightens Pioneer,
Who Falls Down Ladder
(Special Disjixtfb to The Cell)
REDWOOD CITY. Feb. 26.—Fright
ened by the sudden appearance of a
white cat in a dimly lighted hay loft,
John Hansen, aged 71, a pioneer resi
dent of San Mateo county, fell 12 feet
to the foot of a ladder at noon today ;
and sustained injuries from which he
died six hours later. M - -* .
THE CALL
SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1913.—PiGES 1 TO 10.
BOY AVIATOR IN
IMMINENT PERIL
High Altitude Freezes Pump,
Engine Stops and Chico Lad
Has to Volplane to Earlh\
(Special Dispatch to The Call)
CHICO, Feb. 26.—Thaddeus Kerns,
Chico'.s boy aviator, faced death while
in midair near Nelson. His engine
stopped, the aeroplane sailing ahead
by its own momentum. Kerns was
1,200 feet in the air. Slowly he turned
his machine downward and then com
menced a long, circular glide to the
earth, known as volplaning. It took
him fully six minutes to land. Inves
tigation showed that the high alti
tude had frozen the pump. The cas
ing of the pump had cracked and all
the water necessary to keep the en
gine cool had escaped.
J. P. MORGAN'S CONDITION
IS AGAIN ALARMING
Sudden Rlne in Temperature of Mag
nate Puzzles His Physicians;
Specialist Arrives
CAIRO, Feb. 26.—While no fears for
the life of the banker are yet enter
tained here, the sudden rise in the
temperature of J. P. Morgan after he
had been feeling well for a couple of
previous days is puzzling and alarm
ing hi« physicians.
Morgan's appearance is greatly
changed. As he appeared on the ve
randa of Sherphard's hotel today those
who saw him a month ago in Naples
would not recognize him.
Professor Bastianelli, the specialist
whom Mr. Morgan summoned from
Rome, is now here and has made his
first examination of his patient.
Doctor Bastianelli will not attempt
to make a diagnosis until he has
■tudied the history of the case, has
learned every fact about Morgan's at
attack when he was up the Nile and
observed, him for several days.
MILITARY AIRMAN KILLED
Lieutenant In German Army Injured
In Fatal Fall
MUEL.HAUSEN. Germany, Feb. 26.—
A German military aviator, Sergeant
Helfersnlder, was killed and his com
panion, Lieutenant Linke, seriously in
jured here today. Their aeroplane fell
while they were flying around the mil
itary aerodrome, ~j-
FRANK A. LEACH
TO LEAVE MINT
IN NEAR FUTURE
Superintendent Will Resign
Office After Annual Set
tlement of His Accounts
With Government
Frank A. Leach, superintendent of
the San Francisco mint, has made
known his Intention of resigning from
his position Immediately after the an
nual settlement of his accounts is com
pleted about May 1.
It is expected that the change in the
administration accompanying the in
auguration of President elect Woodrow
Wilson will render Mr. Leach's resig
nation unnecessary through the ap
pointment of another to the position.
In case the reappolntment is not
made by the time of the completion of
the annual settlement the present su
perintendent will serve his notice.
It is with the understanding that he
should serve only until the annual ac
counting was made that Mr. Leach ac
cepted the appointment to succeed the
late Judge Edward Sweeney last Au
gust. Regarding his resignation, Mr.
Leach said yesterday:
"It was generally understood when I
was appointed last August that I should
fill the position until the completion of
the annual settlement at the mint, when
the moneys and bullion are accounted.
I did not intend to keep the position
any longer, "whether or no the change
in the administration would affect the
office. I expect that a new appointment
will be made over my head with the
change in the government."
Previous to 1907 Mr. Leach had filled
the position for a number of years, and
in that year was appointed director of
mints of the United States. From that
office he resigned after two years' serv
ice to become president of the People's
Water company of Oakland. In the fall
of 1911 he tendered his resignation as
head of the water company, desiring to
retire from business, and last August
accepted the appointment as superin
tendent of the mint again by President
lTaft - .aat ! i -• t*
"An Independent Newspaper* 1
PEARL NECKLACE
FOUND ON CHILD
Girl 5 Years Old Was Wearing
$15,000 Rope Taken From
Rubbish by Her Father
(Special Dispatch to the Call)
CHICAGO. Feb. 26.— .A $15,000 pearl
necklace which disappeared myster
iously from the berth In a Pullman car
occupied by Mrs. A. A. Sprague 11, and
presented to her by the late Marshall
Field, has been restored to its owner.
A 5 year old girl, daughter of a night
watchman, was wearing it. The rope
of pearls was given the child by her
father, who was unaware of its value.
Hβ found the pearls In a pile of
rubbish containing sweepings from the
Pullman cars.
AGED BRIDE DIES FIVE
DAYS AFTER WEDDING
Groom of 85 Will Now Inherit Kvtate
of (100,000 Left by Wife
of 105
(Special Dispatch to Th* Cell)
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 26.—1n the room
where she was married last Friday,
Mrs. Marsellina Lugo-Leon lies dead at
the age of 105.
Mrs. Leon was born on the lot where
she died. Two months ago her rel*
tivee, fearing that Leon would gain
possession of her property, valued at
$100,000, obtained a court order declar
ing her Incompetent.
The order was vacated Friday morn
ing and Leon and Mrs. Lugo were mar
ried on the same day. Leon will inherit
his wife's entire fortune.
. r-
COLD STOPS BALKAN WAR
Snowstorms Frequent and Roads In
Deplorable Condition.
LONDON, Feb. 26.—The operations
of the five armies engaged in the Bal
kan war have been brought practically
to a standstill by the wintry weather.
Snowstorms are frequent and the roads
are in a deplorable state.
HEARS SOCIALISTS; JAILED
■ German , ? Army Officer Imprisoned for
Attending Anti-war Meeting
(Special Cable to The Call)
KARLSRUHE, Germany, Feb. 26.—
A military court today sentenced an
officer of the infantry to four weeks'
imprisonment r- for | attending a* social- 1
istic meeting' protesting against war.
TVEITTIER FORECAST!
Fe!r,»!»e#oinliUE cloudy at wight: moderate we«t wtnw.
Boost in Every Copy
If You. haven't done so already, send a
copy of tlje big annual edition of The Call
—the Edition—to your
fnsntfs back East. It is good California
publicity.
ROCKING CHAIR
EXPLORER TO HOP
ON ARCTIC FLOES
Unable to Read Thermome
ter, in Yacht That Can't
Look Berg in Face,
Borden Will Go
TMspatch to The Cam
CHICAGO, Feb. 26—John Borden,
who has just returned from Bermuda,
announced today that he would make
a dash for the Arctic regions in June.
In outlining- his plans in his office,
he seized an atlas, and, placing an
index fing-er on Bering strait, said:
"I'm off for that point in June. Don't
gret the idea, though, that 1 am intend
ing to out Peary Peary. I don't even
expect to out Cook Cook. There will
be no scientific Importance attached to
my polar venture. I might even say
it is purely unscientific. If we take
a thermometer with us it will be
merely out of idle curiosity. I don't
believe I could read one correctly.
We haven't any designs on floor space
in the Smithsonian Institution, either.
"It seems frivolous to say It, but
we are just going up there to have
some fun. We start in June when the
ice pack withdraws from the strait.
We shall sail from Seattle in an ordi
nary yacht that couldn't look an ice
berg in the face. We are going to
hunt our way up the Alaskan coast
and pot everything we see, everything
moving, except the natives.
"August will see us &tart back for
Seattle ag-aln. Three months in that
region should be ample. By that time
we will have shot about everything in
sight."
Borden will be accompanied by a
number of Chicagoans. Count de
Soriano, a Spanish nobleman, will be
included in the party.
EIGHTEEN FOUND GUILTY
Parisian Automobile Band I(n Will Now
Go to Guillotine
PARIS, Feb. 26.—A1l but four of the
22 prisoners who have been on trial
as the alleged automobile bandits who
terrorized Paris and its environs in
1911-12 were found guilty by a Jury
in the assize court early today. The
'exceptions were Rodriguez and three
women.
SHAKE IN NEW ZEALAND
Property Destroyed In Wellington, bat
No Loan of Life
WELLINGTON, N. Z., Feb. 26.—Ter
rorizing the people of this city by its j
damaging effect, an earthquake today
resulted in considerable destruction of
property, but in no loss of life.
DIES PLAYING CHECKERS
•SAN QUENTIN , , Feb. 26.—James Mc-
Nair, a negro prisoner serving , four
years for burglary in the state prison,
dropped dead from heaat failure this
afternoon while engaged in a game of
checkers with a fellow convict,"
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
OUTLAW BANDS
DEFYING ARMY
ROB AND KILL
COUNTRY FOLK
While Mexico City and Sev
eral Rebel Leaders in
North and South, Includ
ing General Orozco, Ac
cept the < New Govern
ment, Outbreaks Are Daily
Occurring, and Political
Intriguers Add Fuel to the
Flames by Plots Against
the Provisional President
ANOTHER MADERO
REPORTED KILLED
Region Above Monterey 13
in Complete Control of In
surgents, Commanded by
Carranza, Deposed Gov
ernor of State of Coahuila
—Minister of Finance
Will Ask Congress for
$100,000,000 to Pacify and
Rehabilitate the Republic
MEXICO CITY. Feb. 26.—Keen satis
faction was displayed at the palace to
night over late reports which Indicated
the early disappearance of revolution
disturbances in the north and In por-4
tions of the south.
It Is not expected that the Zapatista
problem will be* solved immediately,
but several minor chiefs have an
nounced their willingness to serve the
new government.
Government officials realized the
probability of a difficult campaign in
the south, but President Huerta, who
commanded the federals In the cam
paign* which most nearly resulted in
the e-.idlnsr of the Zapatista trouble,
and wa» checked only by Madero'a be
nevolent interference, believes he
knows the situation sufficiently well to
end the trouble.
ZAP AT A TAKES FOI'R TOWN*
The Zapatistas have added to the
list of towns they alr«a4y occupied—•
Amecameca, on the Inter-Oceanic rail
way, 30 miles southeast of Mexico City,
and three others of minor importance.
Raiding continues with the usual
atrocities, but troops are In pursuit of
the murderous bands, for whom little
rest is promised.
The revolution In the state of Gufr
rero appears likely of early settlement
since Jesus H. Balerado, the oldest and
most persistent rebel leader under An
drew Almazan and Julio Radilla, prom
ises allegiance.
According , to government advices,
Venustiano Carranza, former governor
of Coahuila, is making little headway
In the .tew revolution inaugurated by
him, with Saltillo Its base.
RAOUL MADEBO REPORTED KILLED
To the report that Emilio Madero
was killed i 3 added a rumor that hie
brother Raoul has met the same fat»
in Torreon.
Both these young men were actively
allied with Carranaa, and, if true, their
taking off doubtless will have a de
terrent effect on rebel activity in that
district.
Carranza still holds the region about
Monterey, but General Trevlno, the
federal commander, who is in Mon
terey, Is eald to have dispatched troop*
in the direction of Saltillo.
The government believes there will
be little difficulty In regaining th*
rebel territory. That region to th#
north of Monterey, Including Laredo,
now held by the rebels, the govern
ment asserts, troon will be added to
the loyal districts.
OROZCO ACCEPTS HUERTA
General Orozco has sent a telegram
to General Felix Diaz protesting hie
allegiance to the new government.
He places all his men at the disposal
of General Diaz, either to muster out
or to Incorporate In the federal forces.
Colonel Pascual Orozco Sγ., who wai
allied with that movement, Is known
to have been for a long time under
the domination of Pascual Orozco, Jr.,
EITHER
STRAIGHT
HIGH BALL
OR WITH
BOOR D'S DRY GIN
MAKING A
BALLOR MARTINI
»
CHARLES MEINECKE & CO.

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