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The San Francisco call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, September 19, 1913, Image 1

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A. Clean, Wholesome
• •
California Homes.^J
VOLUME 114. —NO. 109.
TRIPLE SHOOTING ENDS JOY RIDE; 2 DEAD
Tammany Whips Gov. Sulzer at Trial
GOVERNOR
BEATEN,
FOES 111
■I
Attorneys for Executive At
tack Validity of Impeach
ment Articles—Glynn
Is Recognized
Bl LI.ETIIV
AI.BAXY, N. V., Sept. IP.—< heater
t". Piatt, private ■ecretary to Gover-
Bor Sttlner, this afternoon formally
recognized Acting Governor Glynn us
chief executive.
ALBANY, N. V., Sept. 19.—8y the
unanimous vote of the high court of
impeachment Governor Sulzer today
iost the first fight made by his coun
sel when the court declined to un
seat Senators Wagner, Frawley, San
ger and Ramsperger. The action of
the court followed a statement by
• 'hief Judge Cullen in which he ruled
against the contention of the gover
nor's counsel.
The decision followed a royal legal
battle. In which Judge D. Cady Her
rick led the governor's forlorn hope
Of unseating his senatorial enemies,
and] Judge Alton B. Parker met the j
attack on behalf of the board of man- j
agers.
ARGIMENT OK COINSEL
In the course of his argument Judge
Herrick said:
"While this court is convened for
the purpose of trying the governor
of this state, the court itself, I say
with all due respect, is upon trial. It
is not sufficient that you should be
virtuous, but, like Caesar's wife, you
must be above suspicion in all your
"There can be no question here but
what the senators who participated in
the investigation of the Frawley com
mittee have deliberately formed and
expressed an opinion upon the guilt
of the respondent, or on each and
every article of impeachment. I have
attached a copy of the report to the
challenge interposed."
Judge Herrick read from several de
cisions to sustain the legal principle
of the challenge.
Judge Alton B. Parker arose to re
ply. He talked earnestly, emphasiz
ing his words by sweeping gestures,
declaring the court was without
authority to exclude from its member
ship any member of the court.
Judge Parker continued along the,
lines of a brief. Presiding Judge Cul
ien. uj held the contention of Judge
Parker in the personal opinion which
he said was subject to action of the j
court, and when the roll was called I
upon the question as to whether or |
rot the challenge should be received, j
every senator and judge voted no.
IMPEACHMENT ARTICLES READ
Presiding Judge Cullen then direct
ed that the articles of impeachment
)>e read.
Following the reading of the ar
ticles of impeachment, Louis Marshall,
r or Governor Suizer, atacked the
urisdictlon of the court as a whole in
an argument in which he went into
the constitutionality of the assembly's
action in presenting the impeachment
articles. He asked that the articles
be dismissed.
Judge Parker desired to consult
with his associates upon the reply on
lif-half of the board of managers, and
at 12:23 the court adjourned until 2
As soon as the session got under
field for the board of managers began
his argument against the motion of
the governor's counsel to dismiss the
impeachment for want of Jurisdiction.
Mr Stanchfleld denied that the as
sembly was without power to impeach
and insisted upon th»- validity of tb*
legislative proceedings. After a spar
ging roatrh ovrr the technical points
• nvoived. Louis Marshall began an
< ununited oa Page 2. Column «
THE San Francisco CALL
"Mrs. Pankhurst Is
Wonderful Woman,"
Says Mrs. Belmont
"Made. Monkeys of English States
men and Should Be Admitted to
U. 5.," Says Society Leader
NEW YORK. Sept.. 19. —"If the
Cnited States immigration authorities
attempt to bar Mrs. Emmeline Pank
hurst from this country they will be
displaying woeful ignorance and nar
row mindedness."
This statement was made today by
Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont, at whose home
the famous militant suffragette will
stay while In New York. Continuing.
Mrs. Belmont said:
•Mrs. Pankhurst is the most won
derful woman In the world today.
When 1 was in Paris T saw her dally.
She and her daughters showed such
pluck and courage as I never wit
nessed before. They have made mon
keys out of the strongest and most
famous statesmen in England. They
have made the English government
and King George the laughing stock
of the world. Why, the other day.
Premier Asquith was attacked on the
golf links by some militants, and it
took 16 detectives to rescue him.
Wasn't that glorious? He was afraid
to appear In court against them and
wouldn't prefer charges.
"The clowns in parliament who are
opposing woman suffrages will soon
find themselves in a ticklish posi
tion before the people, as suffrage
Is bound to come, and that quickly."
DEATH SENDS
BLIND MAN
TO SISTER
Heart Broken, Sightless, Wan
derer's Search for Loved
One Is Ended
Fate was good to Alfred Overend,
69 years old, who lived at 81 Ord
street.
The God of Things as They Are
gave him an angel sister. Elizabeth,
who at 73 was his eyes and his bread
winning hands.
Alfred and Elizabeth were the,
family. Like Darby and Joan, they
had grown older and poorer together,
but richer in love with each new
wrinkle.
Miss Elizabeth was crushed to
death between two cars at Market
street and Grant avenue last week.
When his lovely sister did not come
home with the evening, old Alfred
worried. Groping his way with fin
ger tips he started out into the night
to win her back.
The next day a friend found him
wandering, just like a babe in the
woods.
He was sheltered in the house of a
friend, Mrs. W. W. Smith, 1931 Union
street.
Knowing the truth about Elizabeth,
his heart became tired. His hopeful
face became lifeless over night.
This morning at sunup they found
his crumpled, cold corpse on the side
walk in front of the Smith home.
His skull had been fractured In the
fall.
The second story window of the
room in which he had mourned was
open.
Women With Skirts
Slit, and Barefoot
Boys, Beware-Thorns!
Slit skirted women and bare footed
boys would do well to travel other
paths than those that lead into Fort
Mason and the Presidio. Otherwise
they may find themselves pulling long,
vicious thorns from their nether
limbs and feet.
Major General Arthur Murray, com
mander in chief of the western di
vision of the army, has a hobby. That
hobby Is cactus, big cactus and little
cactus, preferably those of the long
His hobby has just been discovered
by Governor Hunt of Arizona. The
governor sent his office force into the
Held and they collected a car load
of cactus —stick ly, prickly cactus —
whfcij has been sent to th* general.
\'.\v many soldiers are engaged in
pialntlng the cactus in various parts
of the Presidio and Fort Mason.
Hence the warning to slit skirted
women and bare footed boys.
FOURTEEN PAGES—SAN FRANCISCO. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1913.
CLEO BARKER
CONFESSES
PERJURY
Chief Witness Against Bixby
Says She Lied in Testimony
Before Grand Jury
LOS ANGELES. Sept. 19.—Cleo
j Helen Barker admitted perjury on
the stand in the Bixby case today,
! while under cross examination by
jLe Compte Davis for the defense,
j She admitted, when sown a tran
i script of her testimony before the
| grand jury, that she had told the in
quisitorial body she was 24 years old.
jln the Bixby case she has testified
she was 19. "I lied to tho grand
j jury." she admitted.
With eyes' closed and face flushed,
i Miss Barker told all she knew.
Secrets that had been burled deep
I were unearthed. Thoughts one shuns
to think were spoken.
As she bared her innermost heart
j to the 12 men who will decide the fate
1 Twice it appeared that she was going
Ito faint. But she prised a damp
' proceeded with her story.
iuvn> iPPEABS 1 XMOVKD
Bixby, facing her 15 feet away,
; showed no sign of being affected by
j her story. Le Compte Davis, Bixby's
I attorney, declared it is not true. Upon
| the admissions wrung from the young
woman some hours before that she
had planned in several ways to force
Bixby to pay her money the defense
experts to show that the story can
Miss Barker appeared much
stronger today than yesterday. Her
face had some of the delicate coloring
that was noticeable when she was
giving her testimony before the
grand jury last spring.
GIRL IS ATTIt tOTII X
Her hair was combed mucli more
attractively today. In place of being
combed straight back and "plastered"
down, it was parted in the middle
and was daintily curled. She did not
wear the black silk hair ribbon that
yesterday gave her the appearance
of a schoolgirl.
Her lips were very pink. She
wore the brown skirt she appeared
in yesterday. Her waist was white
and her throat was exposed.
Although she was not the same
young woman In appearance that she
was when the grand jury's investiga
tion began, she could still be called
attractive.
A book was produced by Keyes.
Miss Barker identified. It as a large
book in which Mrs. Josle Rosenberg,
proprietor of the Jonquil, kept the
names of girls who frequented that
place.
Davis objected to it being intro
duced.
Judge Bledsoe decided that the fact
that such a book was kept might be
admitted, but the book should not be
onened and read.
WOUNDED WIFE AND WOMAN
WITH HER ON JOY RIDE
Mrs. Christopher L. Stafford, a member of the fatal automobile party, visiting Mrs. Katherine
Coulson, who was shot by her husband. Mrs. Coulson is shown in bed in central emergency hospi
tal. Photograph taken by member of The Call's staff.
WOMAN WITH CLUB
DEFEATS POSSE
airs. Josephine Pete of Hayward
was placed under arrest by three dep
uties from Sheriff Barnet's office,
aided by four men under Constable
Manuel Borges of Hayward and
lodged in the Alameda county jail
this morning, on a charge of resist
ing an officer. Her bail was fixed
at $1,000.
With the arrest of Mrs. Pete a
strenuous campaign of three days'
duration came to a close. Deputy
Jack Collier had his linen duster torn
from his hack and Dave Jones and Al
Klhn are nursing severe scratches in
flicted by the woman's hands.
The trouble started Tuesday morn
ing when Constable Manuel Borges
sought to levy an attachment on be
half of Joseph Rosenberg of San
Francisco on three haystacks on the
Pete ranch. Joseph Pete, the woman's
husband. It appears, borrowed $500
from Rosenberg and failed to meet
his payments. The attachment was
the result.
Borges, with two deputies, went to
the Pete ranch, three miles out of
Hayward, and attempted to take pos
session of the hay. Mrs. Pete seized
a huge club and put them to igno
minious flight. Borjres retreated to
think the matter over. During the
nlg-ht one of the haystacks mys
teriously burned to the ground.
Borges then appeared with four con
stables on Wednesday, but was driven
off by Mrs. Pete's deadly club.
It was at this stage of the cam
paign that Sheriff Barnet was ap
pealed to.
WOMEN VICTIMS OF
TRAGEDY SHOW NEED
OF LIQUOR REFORM
MARY ASHE MILLER
Lying on a cot at the central
emergency hospital with a bullet
wound in her neck, her face
specked with powder burns and
flushed with fever, moaning with
pain, twitching and nerve racked
as the aftermath of 24 hours'
drinking, Mrs. Katherlne Coulson
is a powerful argument, for the
cause of temperance.
Sitting huddled on the foot of
the cot, pa!Md> as paste, red eyed,
dry lipped, frightened, in mortal
dread of her coming interview
with her husband, and jerking a*
with palsy from the effects, not
yet worn off. of her spree, Mrs.
Christopher Stafford offers an
other plea for total abstinence.
An afternoon of beer drinking,
followed by a "joy ride" to the
beach, more drinking, dancing,
drunken oblivion and then sud
den death to two men who were
apparently perfectly innocent,
and a serious wound for Mrs.
Coulson, make up the tale of
events which culminated at 2
o'clock this morning.
Ol 1 OF NIGHT COMBS A MAN
William Acker, the chauffeur;
George Kovack, an automobile
washer, and Mrs. Coulson were
drinking beer in the Atlas garage.
Out of the night came a man.
hastily, silently.
The first that the woman knew
of his coming was when she felt
the bullet wound which made her
partly unconscious.
In the women's ward Mrs.
Coulson was lying with her eyes
closed, apparently asleep.
In response to questioning she
at first merely shook her head,
but finally roused to a freely talk
ative state.
NO RESIRE TO RIOF. FACTS
Of the events of the night, she
hdd apparently no desire to con
ceal anything—even confessing
that the latter occurrences were
Continued on Page 2, Column S
wt SSI m Wm HS I I 1 I I I I 1 L H
San Fr ancieco * <s
Fixvst Great Daflty
Founded — 1856
SLAYER KISSES WIFE
AFTER WOUNDING HER;
KILLS COMPANIONS
The Dead and Wounded
How Tragedy Occurred
THE DEAD
WILLIAM ACKER, chauffeur, resided at Hotel jj
Fillmore. Shot through heart.
GEORGE KOVACK, employe of Atlas garage, 70 jj
Oak street. Shot from behind through lungs, j!
THE INJURED
MRS. KATHERINE COULSON, wife of A. R. jj
Coulson, proprietor of a bird store at 1378 Mar- jj
ket street. Shot through neck. Will recover. jj
THE HUNTED
A. R. COULSON, who did the shooting, accord- jj
ing to the story of his wife.
THE SCENE
j ATLAS GARAGE, in Oak street, .just off Mar- ;
ket, at 2 o'clock this morning.
THE OLD, OLD STORY
The cheap tinsel and the brute passions of the j
| gay life of the beach appealed to two women who jl
j were denied each other's company by their sober, !
I hard working husbands.
The women reveled in wiue at the beach last j
; nighl.
; Coulson, home from work, learned quickly his ji
! w r ife had hired a machine from the Atlas garage, jl
j He waited around that garage. The machine rolled jj
; in. Mrs. Coulson. intoxicated, alighted from the ij
j machine with Acker. Kovack joined them. They jj
: drank and joked.
Enter Coulson, revolver spitting fire. As the jj
I three victims felt Coulson bent over and kissed his j:
j wife, saying:
j ; 'For God's sake, Katherine, have I killed youV 9 jj
j Then the man hunt. jj
Distracted by the wild night revels of the woman he
loved, A. R. Coulson, proprietor of a Market street bird
and seed store, ambushed his wife and two male com
panions in the Atlas garage, 70 Oak street, when Mrs.
Coulson and the chauffeur returned from a night o*f rev
elry at the beach, and shot them ail. The two men are
dead. The woman will live.
With an hour's start of the police, Coulson has been
swallowed up by the city. The en
tire police department and detective
bureau are after him like a pack of j
hounds after a fox. Not a warm
trail from the scene of the murders
has been uncovered.
FIRST SHIELDED COULSON
False as she had been to the love I
of Coulson, the woman in her came
to the front when she found her I
passions had brought her into ac-'
quaintance with the police. She
started out to shield Coulson.
If she had stuck to the resolve j
she made when shot down it would j
be a hard matter to convict Coulson j
if he is caught. Mrs. Coulson was the j
only witness to the shooting who is
living now save the man whose arm |
held the gun.
down It would be a hard matter to
convict Coulson If he is caught. Mrs.
Coulson was the only witness to the
shooting who is living now save tta?
man whose arm held the gun.
It was - not until 10 o'clock this
morning that she made a statement
admitting Coulson to be the guilty
one.
"Mr. Acker and ( were sitting In
the garage when my husband entered <
S
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Retail Distributer
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