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The Sumter banner. (Sumterville, S.C.) 1846-1855, December 16, 1846, Image 1

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T% ar aw eadvance, rece
'a ieseX~ i bnWiso r re
Duia'r ait' iie'efid dr the Y'k.'
Advetisemeh at?7&r els per'sg ave
(17: lines,ore ..s,) rthralj a hat :sum9 f4
.eachutguenat prtjon.''he pujier pf iser.
tions 'to be'mds'k :bn'al dveritsemen ,or they
will blpnibishedUTbprdred to Wbe illsorntiiell
ad; charged acco'r I y. 't. s.
One. Dollqrt, er rire fdr, ilge insertionl.+?
'idrterly and 'ojthIy advertisements, will bse
Cluark.d the same i 'a single insertion, and Semi.
mn6nthly the'.adie s. neWones. -
For -pablisting ('ititonsm ai' ,elaw' directs-threl
dollars will be chargel, -
All Obituary. Notice; e;cdeding'.si .llnes, and
CoinmunlcatIons rccommendini9atddhatea forp', f.
MI officesk of profit of tru'st-or puffing Exhibitio I
wlll be charged as advertisements.
f-Acounts for Advetistng'will be presentedfe'
pay.ment.quarterly.
All- letters by pail must bp post paid to insure a
'pfinctual attention'.
* AGuUuLTURAL.
-+om the Temperance Advocate.
1'M. EntoR.-As corn is an ati08, o(
th.e most extensive consumpion tamongst
us-Vithout '4hiche, we could not well
Iive; fnd 'fortie' special betiefit Of
thoise if Your. readers, who * doubt' the
adlvant'age'of'a 'careful selection of their
Wd,"I' 'otilil'beg. leave to tate' a fact
h'twd, "and refdr thim to the proof at
hand. 'Fiiom the specimens shown 'me, in
its gro%'ing state, as well-as when gather
ed, I tiiust afn, implatically, it yiebls more
for-tie industrious lrtid energetic Planter,
thntnny 'grain oftlie kind I have seen 'or
Ceel'reamed 'of. On an'exhsusted plan
tation, ieair Mioniticello, (In the red'hills of
Little' River, 'in ol worn-out Fairtield,
Mr. J. It. D. (I trust he will excuse hik
liberty, in an old. gray-headed man,) has
succeeded this year in making corn, nen
sutiring from twelve 'to thircen incesi inl
circ'umferdtce, and from twelve to four:
teen inches in length, having from forty to
fortyaeiglht rows of grains on the ear.
I'hi: however, is a yield of but one ear
to,'the stalk-the ears from stalks, bearing
fiee"of'st'x ears, or more 'al-e of course,
smaller ;'thoilgh as, three, generally,' cof
the4 rs from thise stalks, will eaeh inea.
nre. when shelled nearly twide6ue much
as the largestcar df the comn'6nirn.
It i's m'stly of the Whvite'gouc-s'ee corn.
The question riaf netrlyisl ifrhe
mtinds 'of many,- Wlien ee litl-r. 'D. get
his see'-1 ailswiethatii'e mnade it by a
careful antJudielus s'electon from a v"
riety of''geed-athgonesis I learn, rema, rk
ahl;'b'ily for-a grain 'an inch deep,'er a
rob flie siz ' of ouiurfingers, anot her, fr
its thickne'ss of'cob, but provokingly shor ,
und the athuer fot' its length (if cob, provo.
kinglfy alifnder,-&'e. &c.': either of which,
bein"regitlerd ih'its sitgle.:sritl 'separates,
capacity wtalif have been tooked upon.hy
niost-planters,Fa'9' hartdly worth planting.
I believe he obtainetihthemosit of th'ese
v'arieties whn tlavellin'g thfrough the West
tern di.nitries some foUr'.* earspast; the
crop' from whiid has 'e Iled him corn
whichl he might, wellchallenge any of the
Wketern Stites'fr n whence it came, and
titr 6nwti Slatdi6 aheat. Thus it is, that
Mr.1D hins mid 'a wonderful improve
meat in 'the great staff. of life and the more
credit is due the public benefactor, on ac
count of bls age and limited experience.
lie is a man of'tintiring energy.good jt:lg
ient,:'f 'tin active, grasping and mas.
terly"i"ind, and of a high-tonted spirit
of'indejendence; 'which, I sincerely hope,
will soon gain him that reward he so rich.
iv merits. LOWER COUNTRY.
From the American Agriculturist.
THlE CORN CROP.
Indian corn wvill soon be among our
largest exports; anything, therefore, which
mlay tend to cheapen its production, and
tacilitate getting it either to a home or for
ein arket, wtill be adding so muich to the
we~alhh of the country. At present prices,
alil acknowledgo it to be a very profitable
enrop to the WVestern farmer, whien proper
attenfion is bestowved upon the cnlture; we
can shbw it to be equally so in New York,
and even sterile New England.
No farmer should think'of planting corn
onm land that is not in a condition to yield
hun ait least thirty buishetls to the acre, and
lilly bushele wvould be still more profitable.
If his land cannot produce this, Ihe had
be'tter cumltivate It in some other crop till
it cant. If, it yields forty to fifty bushels
puer acre, tunder an' ordinry rotation, the
sitalks in the Northern States wvill paynalI
expe'nses of cultivation, leaving thme t-orn a
cletar profit, after deducting the interest of
the nioney oun the land. In this case we
a4Ssum-e' that time stalks are cut tip close to
the grounod, with the corn on-then-proper.
ii' etired:-;and that they are prepared by
the cutting machine before feeding themr
ot to the stock. Many sound, p~ractical
farmer5, coten~id that, ctured andi preparedi
in thls way, a good quality of corn stalks
i/iis valuable for eutle fodder as ha.y. Ou
an average, we (do not think so, bitt will
pett them down at half the present valtie of
hay. here-say five dollars per ton. Ad.
mitlinig thtat they average fotur tons per
arre, w1ell dried, theil- valtue would be
prenlty dollars, which Is certainly nmorc
A e
thtag apt ypr cost -orgu a-ti
acre of corn r *ith w wort t Jii
ive cents- hid in tish inaei 1 hir!
iy bqfoiqh ~ iby AS <#9gfiy fiqels,
8 e600r, freeAlio~w' b t
o( an d argelpr
ntI lsnea. ry: ragant it.
hepIs e1 o jnu e p j
case.,. a more o tA d * e- a)j,
shoial be 1chairg cor
mugiuf i sfertj~ wnl i fili. . afyjs
jog it1 the grounuc roi te i p
.; hleabove is inerel y ur +aD ypp,
.and wgyadmit ihaigi -a fvtntl'ahe.reF
the corn, as n.yth ,l alleatwdt ci ~~J ula
by. the frost,.w aiorm str &fI..,5 lIe
thinktit .h tn~spracr is censjly at
tainable can an svvrage of yearm, thirea'g-.
[ut the country. If gny: cf our renders
' nq make it out less 'or more, -we shtall he
glad to be favoredi with their cid etsla tionls,
atllput them on recordin our. pages.
MlSCEL1 ANEOU1S'
T I I A P P EA L.
What thall. I b, I ve Ithyi) l hatlost
,,,The e y
Wh-en-efevr u 4.'ill ii i Lreath's efr.
Is 'tndeie3s 1 and Iruith I
And if none else a chatirm can t e
Upon thy cte-worn brow,
I loved tl.e in 'the-flush (if youath,
But oh! fatabetter now!
Anad if at timtes a teur 4il fall,
Thy pallid c'lheek t. see,
Oht I deem not that tiine altered look.
I Lis grown less deeir t ine;
Biut that to me It teIls a tule
Of d3iqys of anxitaus care,
And grief and toil thou bear'st so vell,
Which Ivan fain would share.
What if the 'nes wso at my side,
Lanitichel (in lifte's fiekleasin,
I1tnve gained at higher lit ti eaasrith
Than I have sihared withothe?
Nor s-tattely hl m 101e o Sil ni heen
Cant -itn frmi te a sigh:
'Thine heart. lelgated! is wealth enlou'aegh,
Far more thana earth cant buy U
VIer'cha;nce hand fickle fArtune smiled,
Our heaitats haid learned to roni
A nd foutid i chatrtm in wealth ila id power,
To win from Inlca'cvenil ndiome.
il !o1w, when as around is durk,
0111 "sluls ait len-tst are free,
A11d tralisst me. love! that ninte is strong
To staffer tll with thee ?
[K NistetrInocKLa.
A TIGHT SHOE.
The New-York "Commercial Advertis
er" has r'centiiy published a series o' let.
ters from the metropolis, reaplete with hu.
mor ail 'witt and the firllowinag extract frotm
a late number is selected with a view faf iI.
Itisirating the magneic insluenlce, which a
woman's foot will exercise on billpeds of
the sterner sex,.
Did you ever observe, my dear uncle,
how a triviasl circinsta nce will always give
rise to a tratin of serious thoasught, or' how a
single idea, awaskened by desire. multiplies
itself itn the imnagination and takes captive
the sense-subduiaintg the mil to a sweet
abandltnmenIt to its w aried chars, ai
chiastenling reality anad coald fanet witha the
serente yet gleiwinug ianfluenceasol haape; antd
fancy, andac I've..
Sat at is; a laotak, a, motions or a word, will
in certa in moodscl of the inda saffice to
emtins--w it wich iit3 ucons'cimausly
ssrrandas ilhceahje'rt that has a waken sed
the-n, naa thle main .1 baecaesa iisaelf smtaul deal
by he'i r ini fluensca. I beIlieva' suac'h ta statte
is ofta paarursr or elhe cUause iof leave,
whticha, at er all, is p~erhn~apst more a hoantga
paid eaa atn iatginaaiy a e. e lace, thn tota an i
actual gaooda. M en wrtite atasunets le thtiir
mnistrestsesa; if a few aif tha'enmare ta~lnriaoua
are eafte'rw~atrd tempajte d i w rite daeaaa'tic'
stanzas tea thieir wives, they aire, genterael
I y spakinsg, ast dul at nassd inasi geid tas ma tai mo
ny itself.
1 felt stomethaiag iof thtis whien thei widowte
hand left ma'e aoe. Peaps it was Wthe a at
titudae of timaidl---l will e'&il it inatere-.
wvith wvhichi jahe b-il app;r-.ebedla', ame at ahie
wvindow 'a. Perbagt s i t'was the~ traelnitts
glitnee whaichl htasnl a beifore my Ie~eze a
if af'raaid thata it maighat expos1et toao p'haiinly thae
emrotiaonsa ofl thte'inda. Perhapsa.' ii t 'u
bust nat matte'r n' htat it waeas--'eartaint it is
thatt in may mindae tha'e widow''a hada bacecme
qiite ta ediITet'i pr.-rson, I reegariled her'
nto mocre its a mserrty, goe acile.r aied stulI in
miourning, whosi kep;t a hardling hotase ats a
matte~r oaf nteessi ty. hae Ish tad audenlyi hea
comens refin aee, rari Illd as it w eret -iatat a ce.
lestiatl littlh- ma. raiyr. whot luanazhe'd ast her
misfeertunaes, tande lvas the only~ t'erseen igntor.
anit of alat ir .\t t. Aloejae ine the woeerld.,
sinagle-h.lanch i toe heatiensa:inst th..e faiown
of foatetts andac thae vaic'is.siatues ef life., witha
neo one toa Ilnte, tno atne tea sympitathizea withs
her and shte so artless-c atrer..-.o kiiid
_tlif olt phl n h 84 7frii'rnd1'
I"pte ucoa, n ig, I efrmp leh
ellirwake etllh, adild asi nge
hplta I said ad feaslr my It
In tieag lass, .1 wIl to, haiven u
~Thifrime h w~ r' stgestie, nmtdy f
pdit hf led 99p Cn, luno ad ni
thomught,. jhlch deplcted time WIudpuy.as sea. ia
tei at youwr esjid....dilgently seigagilin e
(I'rning sto ihm, whiIe you were onkingi
Qh gglance ofaliqost ftherIy,,'aeetltn hi
nthe'lIfte hmoknUjat roso -fro'in the it
l ui y r:ier ham lingeringarntd il
your ennvalent'fa' tid"'m' de a hole ai
arolmlid:yourkend. - f,,
Ihe..woulel then, sadaI 1, cnntinuing my ir
Bliiloquiy, bo free from care and anxety- si
she would have a sure friefid, and be as m
halppy ah she deseries to'be.' I -know my
ucle woid, love her. si
Ireshe was again--ln.a bustle as 'u- bi
al--her itce flushed with running, dlown W
stairs, aid her merry'srile a m. d1ashing fN
eyes li4htiir 'ip that- prime lap nd black il
close fitilg ionnet, until thoy stermed n'-f gi
totally charming, 11er mu'ff vasinin4
hand, and a pair of I ubber shoes in. the oth. A
er. Sie threw her miff upon the sutfa, iI
okipied Ib the ibirror .anl drpjmped her in
ruhlter shoes .on the hearth ruib p
It is so fling since 1 took n stroll, she d
said, loImkinjg inl the glass aid l eniting her g]
hteadi.a little one side, as she fnionothed'hjer lj
hitar under lier r.p. It is so: lonig sinceel le
took -a stroll! One does not like to walk pi
uttr a bitie. aS
Site s-i-iled ius shte said it. and glinired at
mae from under her bonnetz so provokingly gi
piretty that remy heart leaped. Sihe had fr
licen immiured in the huuse. for want (of a
dusmpaniotn. Jere was a pretty state oi c
lings. I believe, I said to myselU, as I .
ratched every movement of her fingers, rm
ind woutdered why she had not adjosted st
er cap and arranged her hair in her dres- em
ig room-though I was thankfuml site had fr
tt; I believe this poor little widow is as .41
utich isolated as if she lived in a wilder- re
rmeds; I believe tiereis not a soul ot earth at
reels sympanthy fur her. and she so mnerrv at
tmld unassomnilg. as if she- was ilankful ft'r W'
wming'permiitted to live ecen iin a precarious m
;iate; taut it would be cruel to wake Isi w
rom her delusioin, an~d prove to ier thti; Iii
die is exquisitely unhappy. ;11
I was inv a-iurry, :she said; and merely li
brew on.imy*ibe4nnet und sh-mwl. I knew e
here w ~ouhdhro one here but yfu, aild si
tne des not'Id triflts before yt. Alt, at
f youm coud have seenl tile smile she east 4i
aiwardsat me us sihe fling herself upon the bi
rockiig chair, ymu woIuld hive understood h
wihy I Could.. hardly restrain myself. from si
tcting very foolishly upion the spot. I dil vi
restrinm myself, however, and only drew a
'ny chnit close to her's anud intently watch. I
!d her procee'dings: I
It was simply. putting oi a pair of over fii
ihoes, bit I never felt such deep interest fr
n so trivial an action before. lam a'raid t
hat it iII the height of indelicacy for a lady m
o perform such an act before a young t]
'nun, involving as it does the possibility of w
-evealing the ankle by somie hasty jerk or Id
vnotiin- ht-tal ltd it was only before me. til
With tmtuch ado, with maty little femnitine
xpletives- and writmhings of the foot and v
tamping of the heel-she succeeded in n. t
asing one foot and commenced with the t
tiher.
There never was such an obstinate shoe. P
Mhe nc, sooner inserted her pretty coquet. a
ish little toe ini it, than It clasped it with a
enacily (if affection which India rubberar- e
icles have in common with snapping tar. C
les. If site pit in ier finger to pull up thme e
tes; it was imnstantly caughmt as 'in a trap; .1'
C site suceceeded in getting one side straigt, ~
Lime other went dowm; time heel wvas obtsti
tte-thme shoe int fact, wvas collasped and
resoalved neot to he worn. 8 -e was deter- hI
mianed htowever, nout to be conquered; andi te
Cif ou had seen htow earnest shte was, you e
wvoumd havre said wvith thme Scotchtrmitn, that mm
it was a "gmtule sight for sanir eent." Hier"
lace wats fluished .and hlier eyes wvere spark-- p
hnmg witht the --xertion; shte was biting her it
undiaer lip, tutu every moment shtaking her wi
btentd imt sain tog lier foot withI time prem- h
iesmt savnigeness inmginable. As for mem, I h
wass tas muich ablsorbetd in time trmnsaction as Ii
hersi-ll; I bent down, unconsciously held mt
rmy hbreatim, end said ah-hi when she didi.
My itngers were hovering abtout the shmoe,
iati itchinmg to assist hter, and nimw and thnei n
ejiteulted short senitoees of advice or ent. ml
couragnt34e l3mnt.
lUnm te very ducme wraq in thme shoe, and1 e
the widew iat Iatm lot mll pammtience;ahi)e flun j,
it on time floujr atnd itt time sanme time strutcl
mm itt time eye with her elbow. Thisartot it
sedl us to ma siense of the absutinrdity Vol' mm ur
siuntioen, ail wie lautghted itt thme eagerness ml
we hadi boith exhibhitedl over so trivial mit auf.
fiir; we laitu'd, bunt mny righmt eye woumld mi
ntot join int time merri mient.bLut piped a little
laicharymose overtutre on! its ownm accoumt, fi
Wuas amnythinmg ever so provoking? she
exclaninedl, heciomimng qmuite vexedl, I shall
lie compelleid ta abantdmn my walk on ac
mount of thmat abominamble shte.
Tuit!.smitd I, we nmst not he rutfied by h
sumch little difticumlties. Shtall wvebo con
quered~i byv a shoie?
I taook til theo multlish article as I spoke wi
andi betut down on one knee before time wvi
Grmsciou., said site, udrawingbhck linr f',ot
re.,
shied uSiteedi WI: hbnt O~t eidtc, IB
'aeh~eped it, wVh etn Q 7t'i 1
'To help yo talik iin [WI
aidne,-a'hd e ar !"dY
line mere ,"wiuhot b
Pi"elled reshnie*", iti srn:U
rth'avemeder sh6 vrtuaJy up ff
laire of reriet'nd gi ie rs
euitat/d, liutisca att y
cosid-huweim, Wibbed iher to j ii dlid u
ad- fur an hournI ast si 3ebl larIM
(dorilelItw'~o
6*opn tier eyes ith k a I'sld
g the pleasure? t'bh rellys Jel , .
e recolleeted th1at it wa soy Ig .
eucedhjilha 8Irmkirry'rgI:rhi cb
At lat ish. recoveredith-d ntng the
lose In her hand, bdanio r'y ala in so
!r earnest I: remained' on ykee an4
aicheit her efforth; she Wasatilludnsaecees
I, and I assisted her, butifho bstlejfi
eoe bflled our jint , attemnptsrand ihe
ave up the'affair to me altgeiher
It was the first time I ever had airon' '
ot in my laand, and, upon my nr4e bi
ve WtpseISses more poiwer ul, nOs anetic
fluences than the famed torpedo; its touch
mitivelfthilledl through me. I'.procee.
d nar.efully'haundelling the footkisifit-.vers
ItAs, and tho widow bent 'ver.iesin
er lbows, to watch myprogress.ypuaI
(I ip, the.side ofe the slioe,'raisedU ttlheel,
ishel the tei,: and; tuok is long. brea'th'
IIl ilte widti.y did. the. saie unwjttingly..
Alh said I, as I-put the root uponathe
round.1 and leaned backward to survey it
11M angitihir point of view. -. .
Ah,,said : the widow .sorroull(uy, "we
innot do i.
Never-give it. up,,Aaid I, stooping -ones
me to my task, for a bright'idea had
ruck me. To it I wentagainwi * th renew..
I vigor, biting.amy lip'and jerking the hair
om my eyeswith atoms of myheadnow
id thiein. It becaine warm work, but I was
'solveel on victory, and at last. clasped the
Ie with ote hind,whIlefI.aorkid away
the refractory shoe with'the.other. This
ts a ticklish. affair. I-l1 promise -you, and
11ay -ornen .in. similar tcircumstances,
ould have screampd, ormay be fainted a
tie, but she hal noue .of tfiat sipnetige
itmut her. To be surel.! heard- ,eir.y-it&
L.gasp, Its i the snatch for a breath follow
l by a saull.tremulous respiration, as-if.a
gh wits whisperingio her. I fel, a-slight
udder also in her foot, as if thenerve haid
runk from my touch without henconsenti
at I took, no notice. of these trifes aind
ardly perceived that her hand was.on my.
ioulder, keeping time by its light or'haea.
r pressings with those I inflicted upon ber
aki. . But I didi not. perceive thsot whan
was on the verge of triumph and my hair
ad fullen forward she peqsed heq. delica;.
,ge. through it and softly removed.-it
om my eyes. It was a. simple acion but
ithing that Lever ex perienced before gvp
e suchsenations of.vivid happiness; that
uch turned my bloodi to fire-my ,heart
ent mad with jiy, aend I could have anni
lated her foot with kisies, and eatenitei
ion the spot.
Blut the dee: yachie Ndat last, and I
isl some paner Id Ieen thIore to stake
off'" as we surveyed. ., She projected
Dr foot beyond her envious gown for a full
mnute, for ry. special benefit, as I stood
uliting down--yet. looking. in her eyes
ad lautghing- very eilevie-like a fool.
tell there wa.s somie exCustfor me-I was
ated,with my surcess eve!yhing. hau
inpired to please me, and hrpparkHnj
res, as they were ,beng-upon.me.white she
ined my hearty laugh, would f!ive made
iogenes happy.
REQ~sIIONFOR A LaADi~E TOILET.--A
to eleganit writer, who always professeud
ahle ane admirer of the (air sex, has earn
tinily recommended the following, as a
reessary requisitid gfo r a ladty's toilet:
A Cane eyewater, behevolence;. best white
mint, anoceslee; a mnixture, giig sweet
ess to the'tvoice, mildness and truth; a
ash to prevent uvrinkles, contentment,
est rouge, moudesty; a pair of most value.
le ear.rinigs, attentiomn; ant universal beau-.
Ger, good humor; a lipsalve, cheerful
A meat that keegisriches andI enjoys them
ol, is like ant assithat carries gold and eats
nstes.
A ccucsin gthe tIqsj .i but excusing our
.Ives. ' . -
A great fortu:e isea greet slavery. -
A birdl is known by his note, end a men
y his talk.
A tip (of fashion is the mercer's friend,
ec tailor's fool, and his own foe.
A good presence fis letters of recomn.
iendtlion.
A hog upon trust grunts till he is paid
A man in debt is stonted every year.
All covet, all lose..
A rguas at home, but a-mole abroad.
A spur in the head-is worth two in your
eel.
A mitteneud cat never was a good huntor.
A rich mean's foolish sayings pass for
ise ortes.
A young man idle, an old mani needy.
A line iishe s this cuhumn.
tM
W i~r - -ll -
F .
he 1ui2
A..,, A
able e- lidligg
4wed s~l 'esi
1-,, a7ai 7 s),os
sril poaion of sh man
e bi-filane "Pui .(ra eib-~ f.
osmi Fa L
.... inndaf*6-1bitier.g a
The lest eefr ^:f chd
SY' km
A few links of Mtimental ectrS'penti
e4 by a l'derso hiiis tris -'
'Thme he n'athceW i ufi6dltV>
A lank fre a chats, e
Sumeof' the darkns of the nighi whief
succeededl/the day of chivailrf.y
A pair of blankets fromn the bed of the
st n.-:
Some ottim br~Io lacw r&
T -
The e 'tof a nok loc -
On rlepawa ofllhelastcasta~ppe ~
The p inre o 'd;attorne3t d i ec
cuding ,rI'&iaWt da~ny
d ck - .ha. -
A sm1e nr 6
Thm sic I',n sh &h i u' b . c
onsot e: ns
ipfii-Wtha. -rf~C"6W
Soai, o the f'o'se'e b r
ATudjall q'uan LiyW*f t tron th~'e
of- troublet." 1274'"J. ~ 4 )
fe A1cw1ojst afh' ligs of Ad
ret " o I
b is
Oie ~if sh 46 n froai- M bb't
key. - -2
,'A wefik from the scalo. atf
One "f'ih. loose retello? 6
tion-@ryjstran~. h
the: eip. of blis,." '
A fifrm a balance wheel
-Te pquifr part of a nordmious thingA
The tongue oft Madam P.EJb
The ho'e
os ona
Sonieteeth andi. clar' tronfith6 eta
combs of'Parisy -4 f.*
Some vobsinteery spirit ready btrid
andi corked for tse Mexican wara
AW arrow from .the quiver of mie.
Some of the" blood said to.-have been
squeezed out .of~a stone; also, some of the
milk' s'queded out a milk-pot. ..
Someg oJerUen Scott's chasty plas of
soup adme of its saUpenernerai es.
CaJrd-ien y iee
count gentleman atepped ha store a
Columbia-and asked -.
HWave p any aarI
"'We aunt got any thing ble.* the
reply. ~ 'a
"Well, p(s me up 160.poundI andsake'
out yo~ur biJl., I'll call anduestle, and-get -
the sugar, in an hour or to."
Inen husr or two after this, tIgentie
man called * paid hijbill, and goe.the su*
gar.. Ag usual tihe storekeeper said
"Wlnt any thing e-ao,:ir.;
"I did want some tivo of three bags ot
cohe. some rieeg'pices, oil, &-, b-1[
got them as some other'store. Y souo
megyoti didn't have anything cias ;$
store but avgar! . .~
PASS!Wo A WAY. Ttxa.---Ther.' e:ehraI.p4
to all trades i but hours," exclaimesiske
clock-dial. ,. 4
"You're a very And.sbni punt, e.
joined tihe bell.- . . ' .
"Strike away-i deswrvdas bringing,"
sung out two toeighty- litsle'fellowu sblowv
"You be hangedijinserensed the pendu~
ium,t"while Ihavei song in this: affair," -
--and thus thef tickled eachof her fora ful.
hour,. when~she key took hold and ouad
them all upat once.
d.F
PeA..

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