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The herald and mail. (Columbia, Tenn.) 1873-188?, December 17, 1875, Supplement, Image 6

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HERALD AND MAIL
FRIDAY, DEC. 17, 1875.
Published by threqnet of our Mayor.
Tfl HTSTERT OF GILOA lx
Bt JOHN HAY.
The darkest, strangest mystry
I ever read, or heern, or see,
I 'long of a drink at Tagg art'a Hall
Tom Taggart's, UUgal.
I've heern the tale a thousand ways,
Bat never could git through the mass
That hangs around that, queer day's dola 's:
But I'll tell the yarn to youuns.
Tom Taggart stood behind his bar,
The time was fall, the skies was far.
The neighbors 'round the oounter a rawed,
Ana ca'amly dr Inked and Jawed.
At last come Colonel Blood, of Pike,
And old Jedgo Phinn, permlHCUS-llks,
And each, at be meandered In,
Remarked, "A whiky-klr.."
Tom mixed the beverage full and far,
And slammed it, smoking on the bar,
borne says three flngere, some say two
I'll leave the choice to you.
Phinn to the drink pnt forth his hand;
Blood dra wed his knife, with accent bland,
"I ax yer parding. Mister Phinn
Jest drap that whisky-skin."
No man hlgh-toneder could be found
Than old J edge Phinn the country round,
Bays he, "Young man, the tribe of Phinns,
Knows their own whisky -skins!"
He went for his 'leven-inch bowie-knife
I tries to foller a Christian life;
But I'll drap a slice of liver or two.
My bloomln' shrub, with you. '
They carved in a way that all admired.
Tell Blood dntwed iron at last, and fired, ,
It took Beth llludso twixt the eyes,
Which caused him great surprise.
Then coats went off and all went in;
Shots and bail language swelled the din;
The short, short bark of Derringers,
like bull-pups, cheered the furse.
They piled the stills outside the door;
They made, I reckon, a cord or more.
Oirls went that winter, as a rule,
Alone to spellln' school.
I've seached In vain, from Dan to Besr
Hhebu, to male this mystery clear;
But I end with hit as I did begin
Who got the whisky-skin?
Tennessee Dags-
Correspondence Cincinnati Commercial.
It is a humiliating fact that there are
more dogs in 'Tennessee than mn. Re
turns from the don tax assessment from
thirty counties, the first to reach the
Comptroller's office, show 47,574 men and
70,780 dors, These thirty counties do not
mbrace quite one-third the State, but
from them we can judge pretty fairly
what the totals will be. When all the re
turns are iu the totals will no doubt show
that Tennessee contains very nearly one
hundred thousand more dogs than men.
This is among the. "great inducements to
immigraiion' toll farming clasi who
would naturally want to raise sheep in
this favored climate.
And right here let me say what I 6 rmly
believe to be true, namely, that the dog
tax imposed by the last Legislature has
done more to induce emigration to this
State from the farming class than all the
"Bureaus of Emigration,'' all the Com
missiouers, all the printed documents cir
culated, and all the newspaper letters
written. Not a law has been passed since
the war that will redound J0 abundantly
to the real interests of the State. Time
and again the attempt has been made to
impose a dog tax, but the effort has al
ways been stifled by prejudice and igno
rance until the last Legislature took the
bull by the bjrus.
DOG3 vs. SHEET.
Tennessee is naturally one of the finest
heep raising sections of the world. Ten
nessee wool has repeatedly taken the pre
mium at the world s iairs, notably at Pur
is and Loudon, where all the world was
brought into competition. All over the
Cumberland Mountains, embracing about
one-eighth of the entire area of the Ktate,
grass grows knee-high, affording feed for
aheep nine or ten months in the year.
Sheep can be wintered here at ten cents a
head, whereas in Michigan it costs not
less than one dollar a head. This of it
elf is a difference worth takiae into con- !
sideration. Yet millions of dollars ia cash
are annually carried into Michinnu, paid
out lor wool, and scattered among the
thrifty population, making them richer
very year as their tax duplicate annual
ly shows, while in Tennessee not one-sixth
enough wool is raised for home con
sumption! Money is annually drained
from this poor State to buy woolen
clothing for the population, and money,
too, that never comes back, for there is
nothing to bring it. The increase in
wealth in Michigan in one year is more
than it is in Tennessee in eight years.
And in Massachusetts the increase in
wealth in five years is more than all Ten
nessee is worth. That is, the people of
Massacbutetts actually earn and Bare
ore in five years than all Tennessee
would bring, if sold at a fair valuation.
Notwithstanding that last year was a hard
year, tne increase or valuation of DroD'
ib Massachusetts on the tax books " - rtT
rjeight millions of dollar- aasix
is doubtful if Tennea' and lt
will show one b"' , jee tlns ye"
urn. Indeed. ' f- -uaredth of this
cates alreadv , -om. the tax dupli
wniio- i - sent in to the Comn
an ac jm nirty counties, there is
r. ual falling off of about $ 100,000
wn iaBt year, cut in these thirty coun
ties there are over 70.000 dogs, or about
three dogs to every two men. What is
lacking in wealth is made up in does. To
mmj uuiuwiK or (ine sneep these dogs kill,
and the almost complete annihilation of
th wool business in general, which they
cause in addition to all this, they actu
ally consume teoougli to fatten hogs for
home consumption. Jn Massachusetts
the "swill" from the kitchen, embracing
'"t ieiu irorn tne ta.Die, which in Ten
nessee is thrown to the dogs, fatten a suf
ficiency of pork for home consumption,
Tel the Waste from the tlilJp hero i a Inrira.
ly more than there, for here hot bread
tnrea times a dsy is the rule, and what
ever is over gos to the dogs.
Not long ago; f met a farmer who had
aaoved trom Michigan and settled m Mido
die Tennessee.! Of course he wanted to
raise sheep, lor a Michigan farmer takes
to that as naturally as a duck takes to
water. Lie was delighted with the pros
Beet dogs exct-pted. lie told me that
he had wiutered his sheep here at a cost
often cents per head, while ia .Michigan
it cost him oue dollar. But a gi eater itd
vantage still was that he had uerver lost a
ioung lamb here ficn cold, whereas in
lichigan, in winter, the loss was large.
Lambs dropped in Tennessee, even in mid
. winter, were healthy and thrifty, andiirew
like pigs, whereas ia Michiga u the chan
ces were against the tender new comers
at that time of year being able to sur
vive. But all these advantages vere well nigh
entralized by tbo hordes, of infernal
slogs which roamed over the country
fetching sheep as catn catcli mice. 1 his
man was wrought up to the point of de
sanding a iog tax of twenQr-five dollars
head. i
KEMARtABLt DOS DEVELOFMEKT.
It is a sadly significant fact that every
na of the thirty counties from every di
vision of the State the returns from which
have been sent in, contains more dogs
than men. There is not an xception.
Where all the duplicates are made out it
is probable that not a county in the State
nt what will how a greater number of
iosa than men.
Is not this positively discouraging?
Caa a people, supporting such members
"f aon-producing animal, ever attain
wslth? A sheep is a producer; every
is an item of wealth; every pound of
reol sent out ; of the Rtt-.te bring eash. '
quickly in return. But a dog produces
nothing. He is a consumer, a non-proda
cer, a tax upon labor, an namittgated
cars and, where they exist in umbers,
they are a sure indication of the poverty
of the population." On " the other hand,
sheep are an emblem of civilisation, thrift,
wealth. Where you find them ia greatest
numbers, you find wealth, indastry com
fort, intelligence, thrift. Where dogs are
the rule and sheep the exception, you
find poverty, idleness, ibifllesaheaa, igno
rance. the cruel.
The returns from the thirty cenntiea,
taken as a basis, indicate that there are
about 125,000 dogs in the State lilted for
taxation. The manner of listing them in
many counties is exceedingly defective,
so that tens of thousands will --cape tax
ation, but even supposing that 225,000 is
the correct number, what do yon suppose
is the vearlv cost of their ; auDDort? Not
less than four millions of dollars each
year. If what was fed to the dogs was fed
to the hogs the net result wonld be more
than four millions of dollars' worth of
pork annually. With that amount of mon
ey brought into the State each year, you
would bear less of "hard times'' down
here, and less complaint that there is
no money in the country.
An average dog will, at the largest cal
culation, eat five cents' worth of bread
and meat daily. Multiply this by the
number oi days in a year ana aogs in me
State, and we find that they cost large
ly over fonr millions of dollars annually,
to say nothing of the sheep they destroy,
and the immigration they hinder.
What they consume outright would fat
ten more thaa fonr millions of dollars'
worth of pork, which would bring yearly
into the country largely over forty thou
sand dollars. And this in the fac of the
fact that there are counties ia this State
the people of which do not enjoy the dis
tribution of as much as forty thousand
cash dollars among them from all their ex
ports Jmbined.
TWO DOGS TO ONI MAS.
In every one of the thirty counties the
returns from which are in there are more
dogs than men.
In Cheatham County there are 780 men
and 1 ,999 dogs, or nearly three dogs to
one man! I should like to knew how
many sheep there are, and if there is not
CDnstant complaint in Cheatham that
"there is no money in the country." In
Clay County there are 807 men and 1,161
dotes. The total valuation of property in
that county, real and personal, is only
$761,020. In sheep-raising sections of
our land it is not difficult to find single
men who are worth more than all of Clay
county. In Coffee County there are 1,375
men and 2,211 dogs. In Fentress Coun
ty, 638 men to 1,137 dogs.
In Giles County there is the enormous
number of 7,250 dogs! But that is a mod
erately thickly populated county, there
being 4,586 men in it, or not quite two
dogs to one man.
In Hancock there are 921 men and
1,667 dogs. Henry comes nearer to being
an even thing, that country having 3,034
men and 3,21)9 dogs. Marshall has 2,570
men and 4,037 dogs. Moore has 957
men and 1,501 dogs. Monroe has 1,591
and 2,8'Jl dogs. Perry has 714 men and
1,916 dogs. Polk, 882 men and 1.112
dogs. Tronsdall has 768 men and 1,347
dogs. White has 1,189 men and 1,960.
N. B.
By men, as here used, is meaat all vo
ters under fifty years of age, or ''Polls."
They are listed by the Assessors along
with the dogs, except such as are over
age and therefore not subject to a poll
tax. Therefore it would be fair to add
about ten or twelve per cent, to the
number of men here given. But still the
jogs would be largely ahead. And, for
that matter, there are no doubt more dogs
not given in than there are voters in the
State who are exempt from poll tax on
account of age.
The total valuation of real and personal
property in these thiriy counties foots up
$57,912,317, showing a very slight de
crease. LOST SHEEP.
You will notice that there are 7,250
dogs in Giles County. Last year there
were 1,750 sheep in that county killed by
dogs. These figures are mute appeals in
favor of the dog tax, more eloquent than
words.
Last year, in Coffee county 405 sheep
were killed by dogs; iu Perry County, 500;
in Haywood; 1,147; Wayne, 600, Bobert
kon, 1.115; Sequatchie, 650; Decatur,
1,695; Summer, 800.
So far as the dog tax returns are made
up, we find that those counties having
most aogs nave josc ncaviest in sua-
l." u r .i..:-.: v -!
a. rum wuni icw biuubiiitb we umw r ,
ch.an clanrhtAv in . m a a? tlA
it is safe to say that fully ' , '0
ed yearly in this Slat- w"? mrAA ft?!
value of these sh-- - "J' K-
ses, and we h- P 10 ot,h!r,do,f . n;
significar-' .-ve a sum total that is a
:. -jy- -I answer to the question. V by
- .unessee poor
I know an instance where twenty thou
sand dollars was invested in a factory for
the manufacture of woolen goods, giving
employment to fifteen persons, and rep
resenting a saving of over ten thousand
dollars annually to the county in which it
was located. But the does destroyed
the sheep to such an extent that there
was little wool to be had, and the iactory
become silent. The little line of mdos
try is closed, and the section is a dreary
and unprofitable waste, given over to
weeds and the dogs.
There is a clamor upon the part of coon
hnnters, still-house rangers and cheap
demagogues that the "dog tax" be re
pealed. It has aroused a degree of oppo
sition that is Dositivelv discouraging. If
the clamor should be heeded and the law
repealed, those who propose to engag? in
sheep raising in connection with farming
would do well to seek some other loca
tion. But I do not believe that it will be re
sealed. I cannot think the people of Ten
nessee will elect a Legislature that will
stab the best interests of the estate in that
war. Although the dog law is immense
ly unpopular now in sections of the Stat
where they have most dogs and least any
thing else, yet a strong and growing sen
timent is in favor of the law. The man
possessing a really valuable dog should
not abject to paying one dollar upon him,
while the tax will have a tendency to rid
the State of the tens of thousands of
worthless curs which are an unmitigated
nuisance, a curse, a blight upon industry,
a barrier to wealth, a check to immigra'
tion, and a token of poverty and shiftless1"
ness U. V. R.
fcaT
ITER! VATERI
The dry season now being over the
NEELY MILLS
Are running to their full capacity by
I
w All Custom Grindtna done for the 8th.
thus insuring a flue yield to the customer.
Especial attention given to
3Ierchant Work!
And orders solicited. The highest market
price paid for WH EAT AN D COKN. Flour,
Meal. Bran, and Shorts delivered in tliecity
or in the deixt as cheap as the cheapest.
. i u tin tviv -r x-1.' r T V
ROBT. M. McKAY.
H. P. FTOTTFRR
Former!; of Fraakila, Tu 1
Columbia, Tcua.
JIcKAY &. FIUlERS)
ATTOBNEYB-AT-LA'W,
t'OLlHBlA, ULSiii.
trill n Miotic in M&nrr and mdioinn
eoantiM. Prompt attention given to br.n
nens eutruotsd to them.
Ofliee WhittnorneijioeK, up-uairi.
HER IFF SALE.
Bt virtue of a venditioni exponas to me
directed from the Circuit court of Maury
county, Tennessee, in favor of D.' A . David
son vs. J. Y. Hardlson.Esra Hardison and H.
HanllMm, Securities, 1 will sell for cash to
the highest and best bidder, at the court
house in the town of Columbia, on Monday,
the 27th day of Decern bej, 1875, the following
described tract or parcel of laud, subject to a
homestead, situated iu the State of Tennes
see, Maury oounty, civil district No. 23, and
bounded bm follows: Onthe'orth by Kiu
nard and Hellars: Kast by Joshua Harilison;
Houth by James HeUars; West by Stephens
and W.A. Derryberry containing 101 a'res,
more or less. Levied on and to be sold as
the property of the defendant, I. Y. H ardi
son, to satisfy Raid order of sale and com .
HENRY JOHNSON,
Fov. SC 1875. - v , : Deputy Sheriff -
s
HERIFF SALE.
BVvTrtfte flra venditioni exponas to rue
directed from the Circuit court of Maury
oountv, Tennessee, in favor of J. G. Lee and
I. N. fiyers va. T. F. Matthews, I will sell for
oash to the highest and best bidder at the
court-house door in the town of Columbia,
on the 27th day of December, 1875, the fol
lowing described tract of land, situated in
the State of Tennessee, Maury county, civil
district, No. 23, and bounded as follows, to
wlt: On the north by Henry Klnnaxd: east
by Thomas Clark; south by Klch Limn:
west by Charles Robertson: containing in, all
about fifty acres, more or less. Levied on
and to be sold as the property of T. F. Mat
thews to satisfy said order of sale.
HENRY JOHNSON,
Nov. 26, 1875. Deputy Sheriff.
S
HERIEF SALE.
By virtue of a venditioni exponas directed
to me from the Honorable Circuit court of
Maury county, Tennessee, In favor of J. F.
Gray & Co., vs. Newton Bullock and Gid
McKannon, I will sell for cash to the high
est bidder, at the court-house door in the
town of Columbia, on Monday, the 27th day
of December, 1875, a tract or parcel of land
situated in the district of Maury county,
Tennessee, and bounded on the east by Gid
McKannon, south by said McKannon; west
by the public lands of the Baptist church,
north by the same containing two acres,
more or less. Bold as the property of the
said Newton Bullock, to satisfy said order of
sale and cost.
W. A. ALEXANDER, Sheriff.
By W. O. WrrHFuapOOjf, D. Sheriff.
Nov. 36, 1875.
AHANCEBY SALE
By virtue of an agreement between the
parties In interest in the cause of Wni. F.
and E. Cooper vs. J. L. Balrd, this day filed
in said cause:
I will proceed to sell at public outcry to
the highest bidder , at the Court House itoor,
in the town of Columbia, on Monday, Dee.
27th 1875, on a credit of one and two" years,
and without the equity of redemption (notes
with approved security, nnd bearing inter
est, iroiu aay oi saie, requirea oi ne purctia-
ber,:
The following tracts of land, to wit:
1st. a tract or parcel of three hundred and
five acres, being In the 9th civil district of
Maury Co., Tenn., on tne Hampshire pike,
and bounded on the South by tne lands of
Wm. J. Armstrong, on the M est by the lands
oi wiius it. t rierson ana omers, on the
North by the Williamsport road, and on the
East by the lands of Thomas C. Walker,
known as the "Matthew D. Cooper farm."
2nd. The undivided interest (beins the one
half thereof) of defendant J. L. Iaird in ani
to a tract of one hundred and forty-ttve
acres in the 9th civil district of Maury Co.,
iodd ami oounueu oy me lauas oi 1). J.
Esses, George Howell, James F. Baird, and
Joseph Edmundson, lying on the waters of
Green's Lick Creek, and known as the
Joyce place.
Nov. 26th 1875. D. B. COOPER. C. & M.
N
TON-RESIDENT NOTICE.
Joel B. Stockard Adm'r, vs. L. K. Cheatham
et ai.
It appearing to me from the petition of
o F3l.vnjtk.nAU, AUluluuinilor OI UOUll
Cheatham, deceased, which is sworn to- that
utwisft. LnHiuiun. jr.,
Andrew J. Cheatham, Archie Winn, Polk
Winn. Jane Love, Melvin Cheatham, John
L. Cheatham, Emma Cheatham, John
Winn, William Winn and George Menitt
are non-residents of the State of Tennessee
so that the ordinary process of law cannot
be served upon them, it is therefore ordered
by me that publication be made in the Co
lumbia Herald and Mail, a newspaper pub
lished in the town of Columbia, requiring
said defendents to be and appear before the
County Court of Maury County at its Janua
ry term, 1876, and show cause why said peti
tion to resign should not be granted.
Dec. 3-1870. A. N. AKIN, Cler
QHANCERY SALE OF 1.AND.
court at Columbia, Tennw ridered ?t
U? 0.?.bSrffim;ife.il7 ela'use of H V.
will sell for cash to t ZttJuIZFh
land, to-wlt: r ii s .,
A?rv?i i unessee, beginning at the centre
oi tne orinch inthe line cutting orTtlie same
,rfrvey Kerr, running north 14, east
ltu chains to a stake in the old Lockridfre
-yuiu mie; inence north Sr!is, west 17.27
chains to a stone; thence north -UiS chains
to a set stone near a beeech; thence north
west 10.00 chains to the centre of the
branch above mentioned; thence with said
branch &,.lu chains to the beginning, con
taining bv estimation 20 acres, 2 rods and
81 T. Poles! and being part of the land origi
S'.y sold by A. C. White to R. K. Shaw,
oaid land will be sold ou a credit of six and
twelve months, free from the equity of re
demption, notes with good security, lear
ing interest from date, will be required of
the purchaser or purchasers, and a lien re
tained to secure payment of the purchase
money.
Nov. 26, 1875.
1. B. COOPER, C. & M.
CnADEiXSEDTIME TABLE.
LOUISVILLE & GT. SOUTHERN
AND
SOUTH & NORTH ALABAMA
RAILROADS.
UOISS SOl'TU.
Condensed Time.
Nov. 21, 1875.
No. 3.
Daily.
No. 5
Dally,
exc. Sun.
Lv Columbia....
Ar Pulaski
" Athens, Ala...
" Decatur -
" Blount Spr'gs.
" Birmingham..
" Calera -
9.58 am
11.21 am
12.32 pm
1.10 pin
3.40 pm
5.05 pm
6.30 pin
4.50 pm
6.42 put
Montgomery..
8.50 pm
THA IN No. a connects at Decatur ea.st and
vest -w ith Memphis & Charleston Railroad;
at Birmingham with Alabama & Chattauoo-
fa Railroad; at Calera with Selina, Koine A
laltnu Railroad; at Montgomery with West
ern Railroad (of Alabama.) Montgomery &
Eufaula Railroad and Mobile & Moutgom
ery Railroad.
' UOINU ItORTU.
Condensed timk.
Nov. 21, 1875.
s
,1.
fT:,h.ne.M,- "ltK.rin tha town of
SLS'Mtf ".uday.the 21st day of De
comber, lo7- tr ,iin.in n z . ..
I No. 2 No. 4 I No. 6
Daily. Daily Daily,
I excSun ex Sun.
Lv Columbia 7.4."pmj
Ar Franklin, Tn... 8.49pm
" N. & C. Depot.... 9.4opm
" Nashville ,..1 B..Vpm
7..'iS am
8.58 am
10.05 am
No. d
6.15 a) 4i
-. am
-3i6am
lu.:so aiu
10.45 ar,,
iBJr.nl
Lv Nashville ..;i0.1-pm
pm
Ar Gallatin ;lljtpm
" Frankln, Ky .... , 12.:50am
' Bowling Green. 1.20am
" Glasgow June... 2.41am
" Cave City .. 2.55im
" Eliaabetht'n...... 4.47am
" Lebanon June... S-i-Vam
Cincinnati Jc... tt.Ani
Ar Louisville e..xiiii
x..a pm
8.35 pm
ixo pm
5.54 pm
6.10 pm
S.05 pm
8.46 pm
9.50 pm
10.10 pm
.-V.' pm
- pni
.lopui
TRAIN No. 2 connects at Nashvl' ,..
N., C.& St. Louis R'y West for Muf uphis. Jlt
.yeynywiin singes ior mr aoth oVve.
Lebanon Junction with Kir .,A
Richmond Branches: at Cine' nati junc.
tion with L., C. A. L. R. R. for tiie -0rth and
r.i.ti nt Tytnlui'il n U'if h I:. S - . ., ... . -
the Cincinnati and with O. m. RyandJ.
Vt i- v. i . t.ast ana v est.
TRAIN Nr.. 4 connect t ulww Juuc.
tion to and from Glascr nf ,-MVe Citv to
and from Jlanimotb c iive: at Louisville
whh L. C. . L. lv. U. forthe North and East.
TRAIN No. 6eotir . ... i;h,, .Tnii--
tion to and fnm C .,.. atfiive Citv to
and from Mnmr aoth Cave; nt Cincinnati
Junction with Is C- & j. R. R. for the North
and East; at ! Jllisville with O. & M. and J.,
M-itII.,,,c r the North, East and West,
and with C.' i. Mail Line steamers for Cin
cinnati. Maap. Pahce Cars Without Chage
Are run Ijetweeu
Npw Orleans and Louisville,
Via Montgomery.
"Jacksonville and Louisville,
Via Atlanta and Nashville.
Memphis and Nashville,
Via McKenzle. i
C. P. Qenl Fits iz& Ticket Ag't.
Iuisvill, Ky.
TH0S. 3, RMfS (h CO,
DEALESa
V.'
IIS, and CHEMICALS !
PAINTS, OLL8 AND VARNISHES, PUTTY, Ac. PURE WINKS.
r , . . AND UQUORS FOR MEDICAL USE.
( ; i
DYE WOODS AND DYE STUFFS GENERALLY ! !
COLUMBIA, TENNESSEE.
Medicines warranted genuine, and ot the best quality. Customers will tind our
slock complete, comprising many articles it is impossible here to enumerate, and all
sold at moderate prices. may'21-7i-tf
g lg g ? fe- o mi
IMMENSE FALL 0PE11.
O " "
KFT AILING AT
Wholesale Prices.
-0
WE ARE DAILY KECKIVIKU HEAVY INVOICES OF OUK
FALL AND WINTER STOCK!
.i i .m fiillv rjreuared to bliow you tlD;r
And take pleasure ui saying that prepftrea
CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, ETC.,
inanwaaevcr
OUR GLOTHXNa DEPART IYIEIMT
.'hich is well worthy yoer inspectiou y.'1'
(who resides in Uncipna.u,iucii....----- re stock; nnd btMint crawnjur ;n
ally oversees the laake-up and sty ts of ""l,t. uereby enabling ns to outstrip all
market, takes advaaitage oi every decliue ,s uv lu
our competitors iu tUorougU workmanship and
FASHIOIVABLE 10,
And offer a line of price lu our Ciothlns Apartment that wUl -urprh. the clt
bupera In Maury County.
"E. W.
S. B. SPUKLOCK.
Cotton
COMMISSION
JTos. S6 a4 93
NASHVILLE,
Handle th.ir Cottou iu t -
supervision, and tbeir charges will be
riv r,A V 1! hral advances on all
NFf'G
WE HAVE MSIESSE LARGEST AKP
Alld Silver
EVER BROUGHT TO fHK
V, call particular attend Scan
SILVER W&.TCHES, of Swiss and Aent of SPECTACLES en-
oi the best CLOCKS always on r,,"
obles us to uit ail eves, and wo , arr
and Jewelry repmrcu
Sept. io, loij.-oui.
JOHN T. TUCKER- W. F. JUCKtfW
J. T. & F. TTJCJKER,
molesala ani Setail
Gr IT 5aS & 9
COMMISSION MERCHANTS !
Sortb Eat Corner PttbHlrrE
Dealers In Cotton and alin d of . -duce.
Liberal advance8 made on go. n
atore.
A. M. Hugh3S, Jr.,
A TTOIINE2T-A T.LA W
AS!?
SOLICITOR IN EQUITY,
Will pracUceintheO Wrtsof Maaw. and
Federal Court at asuv iiie. "r;-, , all
tion given to collect io? eluding au
classes of clalma again . oSfoiy.
erument. av
A.M.LOOSEY. J.B.-MUurnr
Tnnfiv & Murphy,
Attorneys - at- Law
And Solicit ot l tfcaneery.
yov Columbia, Tenn.
""Ket oi the United Mtat, who teroii-
octl-75-3ui.
GE6rLTG0DDItlCH-
HOKK.
& CO..
cLGXo - rm txxX
MERCHAHTS!
CoUefft Stmt,
' '
TENNESSEE.
.wa Ware JIloZ
a.-, lowaa any reua tl7m
consignment. ,
00 DS!
Xlo.teO Wn,ro,
rircnnTtrCf4 ALL THE
- ; prices. Voir atcnes, v.o0
iice
J. 11. J AMES A SON.
"OTT! A. Tt .T a
U&m jSSilb
HAHPSHIRJ m
JrearVolumuia-
L luitimr
CanJi Paid
Wheat and Corn
Custom "grinding
soLicr.TED-
I'll.. SIIACKLETT .& CO.
HT&VEMffl.,,
m Mmmmv.
' Ik
-i
G-EO. CJ. MILNEI
" EMPORIUM OF FASHiON ! 1
YOUR TTTENTION !
We would respectfully inform our cujtomeas and the public generally
Bryant has just returned from New York with a large ana carefully selected eLfat a4
-PLAIN AND PANCY-
Dress Goods, Neck Ties,
cufis, Toilet
NOTIONS OF
Also, a Splendid Line of
AVhich we will sell as cheap as any
ination of our stock. We still keep
SHrOUDS, and will STAMP or PINK with promptn&sa any order f- .
tended to us. We have also on hand a large stock of Gent's Hatsi
Gent's Underwear, and Boy's Clothing, which we will sell at cost, fts'"ia
cannot handle 8uch stock to advantage. W respectfully solkit ttt
examinatton of our stock.
April 2d, 1875. GEO. C. MILNE..
-J . L J --- - XlRJ
S; g I 3 -a Q ! Phi S Sf
Sis a 00 J inisiaj-d
ALGER ON ALPHONZO DEPRATTA
IAHARTBHNGB JOHN WESLEY HODGE
WILL
ooisp
SttOESt H1TS AND CR0GBtSt
CHEAPER than any one Ml kind of Country Pkoduck tm ik
exchange for goods, EXCEPT PrvOMISES.
Remember the Blue Store. ApgU6t27,1875, -
L. W. BLACK.
XiACKL cfij MOORED
(M'GAAVS OLD STAND,)
ivery and
i2
COLUMBIA, TENNESSEE.
First Class Saddle & Harness Horses
ALWAYS ON HAND.
OMNIBUSES AND CARRIAGES
TO MEET ALL. TRAIN
on
AHE AD
IS OOO.THgOOTgOggH OF THE
CHEAP JOHN S STORE
DRY - GOODS, CLOTHIuB,
HATS. BOOTS, SHOES, ETC.,
bVing'dotermlned not w be un,,")HLAL & BAMBERQEH,
um t.V.-m'o" filnrn
may21-75-tf.
D. T. CIIAl'PELL.
CHAPPELL
onedte at t
nnT.TTMBIA,
HORSES BOUGHT AND
Mr.
- Vehicles of all klnda for hire.
.HbleOmnlbuH" to aud from
HABNKMH HOaSKM.
8.
LIVERY
SALE
iD
ANJO WINTER
Eouches. Collars an&
Articles, and
ALL IHD3M1
one. We respectfully solicit an .$'
on haul aud make on shortest aelaftt
KELL YOU
w. j. Mooa-
Sale Stable!
KriGriX.t
OF Alii
C-olumbla, Tennew
Tennew
N. J. V AUG BAN
& VAUGHAN.
" " -rn-KT-NT
- " TENN
SOLD ON COMMISSION I
, . , iu, on bund to ilrlvattw
W. N. WU;.SiT.CE.A BADDW A
FID
STABLE

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