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Loudon free press. (Loudon, Tenn.) 1852-1855, January 15, 1853, Image 3

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From the Chattanooira Advertiser. J
We publish the following with the hope tl.at j
it may convey some desirable information to the
shippers and producers of East Tennessee;
CHARLESTON, Jan. 5, 1853.
Messrs. Editors. Dear Sirs: We have been
informed by some of our friends that they would
stop shipping produce to this markt, if the rail
roads will not pay for what they loose on the
road. We have looked in to the matter more
cloSaud say to our friends that we will hold
ourselves responsible for shipments made to us,
viz: if there is any thing short we will make all
right-
e would remark that we have done a great
deal in the last two months to get matters right;
you have no conception how difficult it is to get
along with these railroads. When the connec
tion at Augusta is anade, (which will L by 1st
r ebruary,) then produce will come through in
!oU.
We would say shippers must not be discoura
ged but have some patience. They expect ear
ly returns, but when the produce does not pet
here some times three and four weeks after it is
shipped how is this possible. We would re
mark that those who ship corn, oats, flour, &c,
should be very particular in putting all in ship
ping order.
Corn should be put in strong Osnaburg or
Ginseng sacks, when put in the latter kind,
should be sewed with bagging twirp.
Shippers do not know their interest in paying
so little attention, as there is a good deal of
waste.
Corn shipped in this five cents homespun will
not do at all.
We are now shipping 3,000 sacks corn to
Liverpool part of an prder which we received,
the order being for 50.000.
England will want yet a large quantity of
corn and flour, aud prices on the other side are
looking up. As soon as freights deline produce
will go up.
We have to pay 20 cents freight on corn and
75 cents on flour, when in ordinary times com
is taken out from 6 to 10 cents per pushel.
We anticipate large orders from Eurojx; for
corn, the stocks there being very light more
having been shipped from this country this sea
son, but they must have it, but w ill have to pay
for it.
Flour and corn shipped from this country to
Europe is as follows, from 1st September up to
14th December 1852.
Floar 627,502 bbls.
Wheat 1,999,206 bushels.
Corn .. 95,023 "
At the same time in 1851.
Flour 537,037 bbls.
Wheat G99,216bush'ls
Corn. 313,411 "
Thus you will perceive only 75,023 bushels
corn have been shipped this year, against 313,
lastyean now their stock is light and they must
get their supply from some quarters.
Flour in this market $5,75; Corn C5; Oats
45.50. - Your very truly, NII&Co.
Tue New Mail Route to California. The
stcamrr Albatross which is advertised to leave
NeVYork on the 8th of January for Vera
Cru-2riirect, is the first put upon the new line
of communication to California through the
Mexican Territory. Under the grants made to
Co!. A. C. Ramsey, by the Government of Mex
ico, exclusive permission is given to carry all for
eign mails across the territory of that republic
from sea to sea, and thus opn a shorter mail
route between the Atlantic cities ai!d Califor
nia. It is said that the parties interested will
perfect their arrangements in a short timeta
carry letters and papers between-New Orleans
and Sn Francisco in fourteen -days. They nl
ao intend to transmit without delay every mail
brought by any steamer to Vera Cruz or Aca
pulco, and thus letters ic, may be sent and re
ceived eight or ten times each month. A daily
cum-iitinication will be kept open between Ve
ra Cruz and Acapuleo. Sw Turk Commer
cial Advertiser.
Two Weeks Later from California.
Near Orleans, Jan. 7. The steamship Dan
iel Webster, Capt Graffani, from San Juan de
.wiuiaua, nmi-u Jiuri fine It'll On UH? ZIIU UlSt.,
arrived at her wharf in this city to-day, with ad
vices from San Francisco to December 15th,
two week later than thosj received by the Fal
con. The entire trip from San Francisco to New
Orleans, has been made in twenty-three days
being one of the most rapid ever accomplished.
The Daniel Webster brings about 100 pas
sengers, who have among them about $75,000
in gold.
One of her passengers reports that the regu
lar mail steamer to Panama would take in The
neighborhood of $2,000,000 in gold.
The news from San Juan de Nicaragua is of
no special importance, i he health of the place
was good and the transit across the Isthmus nev
er better the trips being regularly made with
out any detention whatever. From California
the news is interesting, but there are no features
of unusual importance.
A number of the passengers by the steam
ship City of Pittsburgh, destroved by fire at
Valparaiso, had arrived at San Francisco.
The rainy season had commenced in good
earnest throughout California, and at the date
of the departure of this steamer, the floods ren
dered many the roads wholly impassible.
The rains had however, but little interfered
with the operations of the miners, who are rep
resented as doing very well. The greatest draw
back to them was the continued high prices of
lood tue want ot which many of them fell severely.
The market for nearly every description of
produce had largely advanced since the depar
ture of the steamer of the 1st.
The greatest advance that had been realized
was the price of flour, which commanded fig
ures never before heard of since the the discov
ery of the State.
Provisions were very scarce and held at rates
too high to admit of operation, except for the
supply of actual wants.
The general feeling in the market was, in
consequence of this rapid advance, quite inani
mate. An organization of robbers had been discov
ered in Los Angeles county, who carried on
their operations to such an extent as to excite
the fear of the whole neighborhood. Plans
were therefore adopted for their capture, which
wtg-e successful, and several of them were exe
cuted. Sacramento had been almost entirely rebuilt,
and the appearance of the city is greatly im
proved. The clipper ship Sea Witch, Capt.
Eraser, which left New York August 20th, had
arrived at San Francisco.
Our advices from the Sandwich Islands are
10 days later.
The only news of importance is the occurrence
of a serious riot among the seamen connected
with several American whaling vessels in port.
At the latest accounts, however, the riot had
been quelled.
Fatal Accident. Boston Dec. C. A fright
ful accident occured on the Boston and Maine
Railroad about noon day, whereby the Presi
dent elect was greatly endangered, and his on
ly son instautly killed. When near the town of
Andover, in Massachusetts, the train was thown
off the track by obstruction, and precipitated
down an embankment twenty feet high, turning
a summerset, and falling upon a pile of rocks at
the bottom of the embankment. The cars at
the time were filled with passengers, among
whom were Gen. Pierce, his lady and only son,
an intelligent boy of ten years. Gen. Pierce
was the first to extricate himself from the frag
ments of the car, which was literally smashed to
atoms: and though sound in limb,ho complained
of considerable pain in his back. His son was
instantly crushed to death. Mrs. Pierce recei
ved a number of contusions, none of which,
however, are considered dangerous. Many oth
er passengers were badly bruised, and the down
train has just bronght in six or eight of the
wounded. The citizens of Andover were assidu
ous in their attentions to the sufferers. Bait.
r Ourselves as others see t,s.. ''We had the
pleasure," says the Home Journal, "a short time
ago, of showing the principal lions of the city
to a stranger, a gentleman from Cuba, and we
may say, a patriot, though not a "Filibuster."
He expressed astonishment at many things the
buildings, the noise of the crowds, the bustle. -But
there was one spectacle that excited in him
a profound emotion; aud what that spectacle
was, our acuter reades could not guess. It was
eight o'clock in the morning, and we were pass-
ing the carriage stand in Broadway, along the
' Park. About half the drivers were seated in
their carriage boxes, or inside, reading a news-
fitir ntVini;isti friend Kt finned Kiirlitan-
r P . , . , , . . , . experiment has been male in Scotland to try
i -...3 AAni.nnDil tn Innlr nt tins. rr linn n. moor. 1 J
J' . i .-, the conmartivc value of these two modes of fat
novel ana extraordinary spccuii-ie, uum ouu 01 , . -
, ,. , r . j tcnin cattle. Ten animals having been chosen
the drivers caught his eye, and leaped down in a .
x i w t a ' , 1 were divided as cquallv as possible; five were
hone of a customer. W e then moved on, and j . 1 1 '
1 . , i ir . a iv ir rut in a sheltered court, with plentv ot shed
rf.-vnnliT flfterferl eYnrejen himself I "J I
our vuwi - x.- , v.,..v
. thus:
53?" We have been kindly furnished by Mr.
Pritchakd, Chief Engineer, with the following
table of elevations of various points upon the
line of the East Tennessee and Georgia Rail
Road, above the level of the sea:
Dalton, Geo.
Varnell's, "
Tennessee line,
Cleveland,
Charleston,
Low water niwassee river,
Athens,
Mouse Creek Summit,
Sweet Water,
Philadelphia,
Loudon,
Low water of Tennesse river,
Lenoir's,
Summit of Knox and Roane 1
Turkey Creek, .,
Wattr of do.
Stones,
Heiskells,
McCIellan's Summit,
Water of Second Creek,
Kuoxville,
771 Feet
828 "
837 "
778 "
-71S "
C84
993 "
1023 u
920 "
871 "
814 " '
738 "
786 "
882 "
809
778 "
834
898 "
972 "
870 "
898 "
I Sheds. An
"It is the crandest thing I have seen in your
industrious country! The carriage drivers read
newspapers! When shall I see that in my poor
Cuba!"
Mr. John H. Smith, of Brooklyn, has inven
ted a reaping machine, which certainly seems
to be the simplest yet brought before the public.
The inventor has just taken out his patent.
The machine is very compact and light. Four
sytb.es with three cradle lrame3 are. fastened to
the rim of a drum or cylinder, having a virtical
rnt.arv motion. The drum for a medium
size machine is to be six feet in diameter.
The svthes are so arranged that every revolution
of the' cylinder simultaneous with the stroke cuts
and lodges the grain in a standing gavel inside
tjj4,Avjjier or drum, whence those who hold
theXl'ne can conve,un7 bend and dispose
of the bundles of grain. This mode of gather
in the grain wholly dispenses with raking.
The grain is cut by the same kind of a stroke as
made with a hand cradle. It is in fact the old
I mode of hand cradling worked by machinery
and worked by horse-power. The machine can
be worked by one horse and cut 25 acres of
grain in a day. Republican Banner. ,
Tennessee Credit. A transaction in the six
r cent State stocks of Tennessee transpired
tr . . trnlon Messrs. Brown.
a. Mor I nrn uu jiuuuaj- "v-"w . '
room, ana tue otners in uoxes. ill me uerin-
ninr of October it was soon found that those in
the court ate one hundred and thirty four pounds
per day, while those in the boxes ate only one
hundred and twelve pounds, or twenty two
pounds less, thus proving that a certain degree
of warmth is equal to food. . After several
months, toward the end of April, they were all
slaughtered, and the following results were
found:
Cattle fed in boxes: beef, 3,262 pounds; tal
low, 6.678 pounds. Cattle fed in courts: beef,
3,416 pounds; tallow, 6,054 pounds.
These results show the superiority of feeding
in boxes. It is thought that in a less mild win
ter it would have been more striking. Iu the
course of the experiment the thermometer rose
to fifty degrees, and the cattle under cover seem
ed to suffer from bein too warm.
It was found a trifling expense to comb them
regularly, which speedily produced a very mar
ked improvement.
Such suggestive facts as the above should be
duly considered by all graziers. Wool Grower
Death of Mr. reM. We learn by tele
graph that young Ingram, a cadet of the Frank-
From the Southern Lad it J Booh for Noremle r.
THE DEATH OF THE YEAR.
T GEO. D. PRENTICE.
List! UV. what fearful tone was that which rose
Uloii the triuti of midnight? Nature sounds
No knell o'er earth for the departed year,
Yet when its last breath passed into the void
Of the by-goue cternitr, I heard
Hchoed within the chambers of my soul
A sound, perchance the shadow of a sound,
Wild, strange and dismal, as it were a wail,
A low and Mended wail, from all the grave3
And sepulcrcs of ocean and of earth
Upon the stilly air. Oh was it not
The solemn voice of old Eternity
Uttering one cry, one wild and deep lament,
For his dead child !
Tito year, alas! is gone
Forever from the world ! He seemed too strong,
Too mighty e'er to die. ne laid his hand
On breathing millions, and they s:tnk beneath
The green grass of the grave; he blew aloud
The trumpet-blast of battle, and dark hosts
Met in the mortal shock, and when the fiamo
Aud smoke of conflict had'gone by, they lay
Like Autum's red leaves on the plain; he passed
O'er earth, and at each wave of his broad wings,
Volcano, eaathrjuake, whirlwind, storm, and flood
Sprang up beneath the silent spell, and wrought
The fearful errands of their destiny;
Yet now, his own great mi siondone, belies
On scorched and broken pinions with the dead,
There, thero to sleep.
What is time?
A giant-power stern, vast, and bodiless,
That we may feci, but never see. We gaze
With aching eyes into the past, and there
We see a thousand shapes of light an gloom
Floating like atoms on the pallid beams
Of mournful memory, but the perished year
l3nll unseen. From thence we sadly turn,
And, gazing on the future, we behold
Dim, countless phantoms trooping from its dark
Unfathomcd ocean to the lonely thoro
Of earthly being, but the coming years
Are all invisible. And then we pause
And gaze above, around, beneath, and lo!
Our eyes are fctartled by the mighty deeds
Of the now passing time; the iron weight
Of his stern presence rests upon our souls;
We feci the awful spectre touch our brows
With his cold deathlike finger; and we hear
The deep and mingled roar that rises np
From all his mighty doings 6n our earth; '
And yet he has no form to cast its gleam
Or whadow on our tight.
The parted year
Called forth from earth a blooming Paradise
Of sweet spring-flowers-he waved his autumn wand
And they were not. He woke in human souls
Myriads of hopes and joys and burning loves,
That seemed like things of immortality
He touchwd tueni aud they died. Another year,
The gift of God, is cast beneath the skies,
And what is darkly bidden in the still
And silent depths of its mysterious months,
We uiaynot kasw th:tnk tJod, we may not know.
We ouly know that with each passing month
And day and hour, the low, deep wail of grief,
The maddened cry of agony, the shout
Of i.erce ambition, the loud thunder-shock
Of bloody conflict, aud the knell of death
Will echo, each, its one briof moment o'er
The sea of time, nnd then be swallowed up
And lost forever in the ouward sweep
Of its uupityiug waves.
The midnight skies
Are weeping silent tears as if they grieved
For the old year, and the pale stars look sad
And tremble, as if living, sorrowing hearts
Were throbbing in their breasts. In vain! in vain!
The faded year is nothing now. The flowers,
The birds, the waves, the thousand melodi.'s
Of vernal life and nature will come back,
I?ut he returns no more. The winds may search
For him in iheir far journcyings: thejjrand
Old ocean its thunder-tones may call
Forever to him in its ceaseless dash
Beneath the heavens; the bright and burning stars
With their high tones of Edens minstrelsy
May speak his name in their eternal Bweep
Along their flaming paths; the comets wild
May seek hi:n hy the baleful bl:i;e they spread
Through realms of ancient night; but nono of these
Shall ever find him, for ha liveth not
In all the universe of God. Years die,
And centuries die and there will come a day
When the dread angel of the Apocalypse,
Standing on land and sea, will lift his hand
And swear that time shall bo no more
Yet thou,
Oh man, wilt never die. The earth will pass
Like a wild dream away, the very heavens
He rolled together as a scroll, but He,
lieneaih whoso feet the sun and stars are dust,
Hath said that thou shalt never die. Those great
Aud awful words of the Omnipotent
Are caught up and re-echoed to thy soul
By all the world of nature. A deep voice,
That tells theo of thy immortality,
Speakes in tho breeze and iu the hurricane:
Blends with the gentle music of the stream,
The loud rush of the cataract, tho peal
From the dark bosom of the cloud, and all
The thousand mystic cadences of night,
Deep mingles with the everlasting roar
Of ocean in his will unrest, and swells
Forever in the angel-symphonics
Sung by the stars around tho midnight throne.
Louisville, kt., IS 52.
? ., . t. n Moccre Rnthsehilds. per Au
nlmnnt'' bought $300,000 at eight per , fort Military Institute, died on the 25 ult., from
4 m;m ex-divided, transmission to Eu-; the effects of the wounds which he received in
P'i. 'i A f,r that State
rop, iui t
4 .
"Ixcuse me, madam, but I would like to ask,
whypu look at me so very savagely? Oh
beprdon, sir! I took you for my husband!
the unfurtunate rencontre which recently occur
red between himself and Mr. Purnell, who was
also a cadet of the Institute. He was a son of
Pr. Ingram, of Denmark, Tennessee.
Louisville, Texn, Jan. 12th, 1853.
Messrs. Editor:
You will confer a favor if you
will publish the following in your paper. The
list of Officers elect of the Louisville Division,
No. 251, Sons of Temperance for the Quarter
commencing January 1st, 1S53:
James n. Cox, P. W. P.
A. L. Gilbert, W. P.
M. L. Sc ott, W. A.
W.-C. Wauxack, Il.'S.
T. J. Ror.isox, F. S.
W. L. Tefeteler, T.
Jonx K. IIoges. C.
S. G. Si vav, A. C.
"T' R. . CuiiMixos, I. S.
Jonx Sperceu, O. S.
At a regular meeting of the Louisville Divis
ion, Xo. 251, Sons oi Temperance held in the
Sons Hall, Wednesday 13th January 1853, the
resolutions of the Knoxville Division, in regard
to the convention to be held at that place on
3d Friday in February, for the promotion of
the cause of Temperance, kwere unanimously
received and adopted, and the following dele
gates were appointed from this Division:
James B. Cox, R. L. Warren,
WM. C. Warnack, John Spcrger,
R. F. Wilkerson, M. L. Tefeteler,
A. L. Gilbert.
Done by order of the Division.
W. C. WARNACK, R. S.
How pleasant is a lovely thing a little out of
season a rose bud in winter, for instance, or a
kiss in church when the deacon's eyes are
'closed in prayer Stolen apples don't begin to
shine.
A lady sent to the Philadelphia Sun, a man
to borrow a newspaper containing something
iretty and interesting. The fellow wrapped
limself up in paper and toddled off to see her!
A Good One "My dear what shall we name
onr baby?" said Mr. Smith to Mrs. Smith the oth
er day
"Why, huz I've settled on Peter.'
' Peter! good Lord, I never knew a man with
simple name of Peter who could earn his salt."
"Well then we'll call him Salt rder?
THE BALTIC'S NEWS.
New York, Jan. II.
Brown, Shipley & Co., quote cotton, market
quiet for the past three days. Sales of 7010
bales; export 500 bales; no speculation; prices
rather favor buyers, not so decidedly as to cause
a chauge in quotations. Corn dull and un
changed. In Manchester the market is firm.
Irish bacon has advanced to 40s, and pork 5s.
Fraxce. A decree nominates the ex-Kin?
Jerome and his son's lineal heirs to the throne,.
or adopted issue of Napoleon; also that Sena
tors be paid pensions.
The people: of the North West frontier in
India have revolted. The war at the Cape of
Good Hope is nearly ended.
Consols are quoted at 100J.
New Orleans, Jan. 12
Mess pork $17418. Bacon, sides 9(7?9
Whisky 20. Fair sugar-4 J-. Rio coffee 90J
Barrel lard 101 OK
ESj-Pettox Raxdolph, Esq., formerly of
lrgima, died suddenly in Washington city, on
the 4th inst. He was in his 70th year, and had
just ivtrinied from market, and remarked to his
son that he had not felt well for several weeks,
aud had scarcely taken his seat when he .fell on
the floor and died before the family physician
could arrive to see him.
The St. Louis Evening News says that Mrs.
Gen. Ashley, of that city, is the lady to whom
it is reported Hon. John J. Crittenden is soon to
be married
" Malt 'iinoiiy. Marriage is the mother of the
world, and preserves kingdoms and fills cities,
and churches, and Heaven itself. An unmar
ried man, like a fly in the heart of an apple,
dwells in perpetual" sweetness, but dwells alone,
and is confined and dies in singularity. Rut
marriage, like the useful bee, builds a house
and labore and unites into societies and repub
lics, and sends out colonies, and feeds the world
with delicacies, and exercises many virtues, and
promotes the interests of mankind, and is that
state of good things which God hath designed
the constitution of the world.
A letter from a Mormon says: ''My two wives
and Miss Smith are all well. The little children
are all well, and grow finely. The two youngest,
a boy aud girl were born last July, 11 days
apart."
Bishop Otey is out in a letter to the Memphis
Eagle and Enquirer, contradicting the report
that Bishop Ives, of N. C, stating he had gone
over to the Catholic Church. He also refutes a
similar rumor, with regard to the Rev. Mr.
Wells, of Boston.
The North Carolina Legislature has adjourn
ed without making au election of United States
Senator.
General Lane said, one day, at Indianapolis,
in his speech after dinner, that he was "7oo full
for utterance!'1
MARRIED,
On the 25th nit., bv Wm. X. O'Brien, Esq.,
Mr. WILLIAM SHELL, of Johnson Countv,
to Miss LUCINDA C. CAMPBELL, of Car
ter County, Tennessee.
On the 9th of Jan. by W. A. Harri.. Esq.,
Mr. TIQMAS OLIVER, to Miss HANNAH
SHIPLEY, all of Grainger county. .
In Maryville, Blount countv, bv the Rev. Dr.
Anderson, Mr. THOMAS POPE, son of the
Rev. Mr. Pope, to Miss MARY ANN. daughter
of Dr. Samuel Pride, all of Maryville.
i)ii;i),
In Knoxville on the 7th instant, after an illness
of four days, Mrs. MARY E. BARRY, wife of
John W. Barry, and daughter of Felix W. and
Rachel Earnest.
Religious Notice. The Rev. Mr. Gay will
preach in "Davies" School House, in this place
on Sunday the 23d inst. at 1 1 o'clock, a. m.
Rev. Dr. Grant will also preach in '"Davis"
School House, on the same day, at the same
time.
LOUDON' PKODUCU MAHKUr.
Carefiillj Corrected Wevkly.
When Sidney was told he might save his life
by telling a falsehood by denying his hand
writing he said: "When God has brought me
into a dilemma in which I must assert a lie or
lose my life, He gives me a clear indication of
my duty, which is to prefer death to falsehood."
Dan Tucker in the vcay Again. A Western
paper announces the marriage of Daniel Tuck
er, Esq. to Jemima Ann Wnv. "Get out of
Way Daniel Tucker."
nnf T-
Al rijM: j
Green, " bushel, 40(i.o0
Dried, pealed, 50 (a-60
unpcaled....25(a, 30
BUTTER, ft...10fa15
Apple Bulierpgid -0(,75
bacox. n site 9
BKAXS:
White. bushel, 0050
Mixed do 40(45
BEEF:
Hind qr. Ib 3i 4
Fore, do..- U Si
Hams, dried, lb 78
Shoulders do ..M(fi,
BEESWAX, f lb 2C&25
CANDLES.
Tallow, lb 1018
Star do 33(oj3i
Adawantdo 00u.00
Sperm. ...do 50(55
CLOVEKSEED:
bushel $7 5000
COFFEE:
9 IU i Ky -2
Laguiro, J K.... 11$ ($11
Java,1:) It H10
CORN MEAL:
bushel 3310
CHEESE:
Countrv. lb S'tfilO
Cheshire. ..do 20y-00
CHICKEN'S:
Each 1012
CABBAGES ..3(3.4
EGGS, i dozen. ...8(d, 10
FLOUR:
S. F.tplOO lbs, $2(3,2 25
Buchweat, do 2(a2 25
Rvo -do 0(0 00
FISH:
Mackerel. No. 1, $1315
" " 2...10(ojl2
" 3 89
FEATI1 ERS. p lb 2S (a, 3.!
FLAXSEED, bu. (00
GRAIN:
Wheat, bushel, 7075
Lorn, ao zoctuau
Oats, do . li2(oj25
Rye do 4550
Barley do 0000
GINSENG, tt 202b
HONEY, lb 8(0)10
HOLLOWARE:
Tennessee, lb...2i3J
Etowah do ......31(3,4
HIDES:
Dry, lb 810
Green, do 500
HAY, 1$ ton $5(a,0 00
IRON:
Tenn. hammered, 3J4
Rolled,. 3i5
Hoop 0(3,0
Nail Rod 6i(3,7
Pig Metal,t ton, $20(3,00
KKOL'T:
p bbl $3
bushel 50(ai 75
LARD, 'r tb .KJWfi.10
LUMBER. or...i0in,2j '
' i - - - ,
l euce po;-ts, each, 111(3, 12
N. O.'f gallon,. ...45(3,50
.Sugar House, 00(300
Cuba 40(3j0
Svrup 50(0(75
NAILS:
Cut,...j lb 5jfii
Wrought, do 124(0,00
OILS:
Linseed, p gal. S0$100
Lamp....do...l 20(0,1 37
Tanner's.do FOfoil 00
Train do $11 25
ONIONS, bush. 40(0,50
runutit:
Blasling.-fl keg, $3 904
Rifle lo 5 50(0.6
PEAS do 30(o; 40
POTATOES:
lri.h, $ bushel 3540
Early seed, do 50(0,00
tweet, do 3jo,50
PORK, lb 5i(o,0i
PEACHES:
Unpcaled. p bu $1 50
Pealed 2 00
RAISINS, bo.,$:i0
RICE, lb ti(o,S
SUGAR:
Loaf, 33 lb 1112
New Orleans,... do. ..7(o)9
Portico do 6(a, 10
Muscavado do.. .7(0,-9
Crusli 11(0,121
Powdered lo 12J(oil3
SALT:
r;n,v m hnshfi- - no
Liverpool, "0 sack, $2 75"
SOAP, ID
SHINGLES:
1000 $3-3 50
SILLIj
Cast B lb...
German.. ..do
Eng. Blister, do..
American do..
TURNIPS. bu
TALLOW, lb 8i10
TOBACCO, m I2($uu
TUR KIES. t hd. 20 (o 50
VINEGAR, gl. 25(0,30
,.2025
. C(r.l8
..15(0)18
....9lnl0
o20
From th Aogusta Chronicle and Sentinal, Jan. 12.
Trade and Business. Since the termination
of the Chrismas holidays and the return of more
favorable weather, business has began to revive,
and our'dealers during the pa ;t week ha.e been
engaged iu a very fairiradi..
Groceries. In the Grocery market Le stocks
are generally very good fully equal to the de
mand, which, during the week, ha3 been very
fair. Prices in all the leading articles, Sugar,
Coffee, Molasses, Iron, &c, are steady and well
maintained. Salt is again becoming rather
scarce and holders have advanced their rates a
little, with which our quotations correspond.
- Provisions. The.- Bacon market continues
well supplied, and prices are the same as last
quoted, except for Hog round, which ha3 slight
ly advanced, a3 our quotations will show. Lard
is a shade lower. Fish has materially advan
ced and our quotations have been made to con
form to the current rates. The supply of Flour
continues abundant, and prices have undergone
no change except for City Mills which has ad
vanced to $3 bbl.
Grain. The demand for Corn and Wheat con
tinues good and our quotations are fully main
tained.
Exchange". Checks on the North are abun
dant at par.
Freights. The river continues in line navi
gable condition, and the rates are the same as
last quoted 50 cents to Savannah and $1.00 to
Charleston fi bale for Cotton. ...
AUGUSTA PRICES CTJRKEHT.
Ai'GCSTA, Jan. 1
Arfielr Tint talc.
BACON. Hams.- per lb. S 13J
Shoulders " 10 (i
Sides " 11 (3)
Hor Round " 11 (0
BUTTER Goshen...... . V 23
Countrv, " 15
BEESAVAX, 18
BRICKS, pr.1,000 6 00
('3
(3
(o
13
CHEESE Northern, ...per lb. 11
English Dairv " 11
COFFEE Rio,.." " 10
Lauira - H lOJ-
Java, " 13
Domestic Goods Yarns 75
3 Shirting per yard 6
i " - 5i
1 " 9 (id
?-4 " " 9 (u
6-4 " 11 Vji
Osnaburgs " 8 (i
FEATHERS per lb. 3.5 (o)
FISH Miukcrel,No.l per bbl. 13 50 (0)
No. 2 " 10 00 (a;
No. 3 " 8 50 Q3
No No. 4 this year.
Hcrrinjrs per box '
FLOUR County, per bbl.
Tennessee, " 5 50
Canal, 5 75
Baltimore. " 5 50
Hiram Smith's " 8 00
City Mills, " 5 50
GRAIN Corn, pcrbush. 50
Wheat, " SO
Oats, " 37
Rye " 75
Peas " 55
GUXTOWDER,
Duponts' pcrkeg. 475
Hazard, " 75
IRON Swedes per lb 4V
English, " 2J
LARD " 12i
LIME, Countrv per box
Northern, per bid. 2 25
LUMBER per 1,000 10 00
MOLASSES, Cuba per gall, 25
Orleans
XAILS, per lb.
OILS Sperm, prime per gall,
do. common,
Reined Whale, "
Train, "
Linceed, "
Castor, "- "
RICE. per tierce
ROPE Kentucky, ptr lb.
' Manilla, "
RAISINS. p?r box
Spirits Xorth'n G in.pr. -gall.
Rum, "
X. O. Whiskey,
l'each Brandy, " 75
Apple do " 50
Holland Gin, " 1 25
Cognac Brandy, " 1 50
SUGARS N.Orleans,per lb. 5J
Polo Rico, " 7
St. Croix, " 8
Muscovado, ' 6
Loaf, " 1CJ
Crushed. " 10
Powdered, " 19
Stuart's Refined A, " Si
" B. " Si
II II II g
SALT, per bushel, 00
" per sack, 145
Blown, " 3 00
SOAP Yellow, " per lb. 5
SHOT, per bag,
Twixe IlempBng'ng. per lb. 18
Cotton Wrapping, " 15
.
4
1 60
75
I CO
75
90
1 50
4i
8
. 12
Z 50
35
35
07
(3
d3
(3
("J
(3
(3
Q'j
(&
to
(3
d3
(ilr
3
G
3
(3
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
u
o
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a .
a
a
rt
a .
a
a
a
2, 1853.
I! ctrn l. .
15
11
121
12J
35
25
20
S 00
121
121
12
121
16
S7
7
7
10
10
14
9
35
15 00
12 00
9 50
1 CO
' nono.
6
7
7
8 50
6 CO
60
100
- . 50
85
' 62
' 5 50
5 50
4i
3
15
none.
2 50
11 00
23
s:i
6
1 75
1 00
1 15
l w. r. nAnp.is.... .......skidvork harrts.
00
CO
51
9
It
00
40
40
30
00
75.
75
50
7
8
10
121
11
11
10
9
81
00
50 '
3 50
6
1 62
25
25
1
Freight and Transportation,
From Xu1itSUe to Xeic Qitemi.
Cotton, per bale $1 25 to 1 50
Tobacco, per hogshead 4 00
Lard and Pork, per bbl 65
Pound freight, 40
" " from New Orleans 2 10
Freight rout A"Ari7e to Chattanooga.
Groceries, per hundred pounds $ CO
Dry Goods, " " " 75
Bacon " " " 58
Whiskey " barrel 1 60
Fashionable Boot Hakera,
LOUDON, TEXX.
J II AVE just received one of the le?t sripplies of
Materials ever brought into East Tennessee,
and are prepared to make HOOTS in the
best and most fashionable Fty'.e, on short notice: nnd
respectfully solicit a liberal patronage. Our work is
warranted not to be surpassed iu East Tennessee, or
elsewhere. Ilrpnirimj of all kind, done with neat
ness and dispatch. , Jan. 15, 1352. 9
X. T. LOWE,
WHOLESALE AND RETAlf MERCHANT,
LOUDOX, TF.XXF.SSEE.
Groceries! Groceries!
Produce! Produce!
Freights and Transportation,
Hetureen Loudon, Charleston and Savannah.
Ores, Coal, Hay, Marble, Bar Iron, Stoves, ic., by
the Car load of 16,000 lbs. per ton $11.50.
Live Stock, per Car load of 16,000 lbs. 113.00.
Wheat, per bushel, 25 cts. Flour per barrel $1.75.
Flour per Car load of 50 barrels $1.25.
Bacon, Beef, Pork, Ice, Dried Fruit, Ac., in Backs,
boxes and barrels, per hundred 60 cents.
Corn, (56 lbs. to busbel (Peas, Beans, Rye, Meal,
Rice Floury Sweet Potatoes, in barrels or sacks, per
bushel 25 cents. .
Ctbbsges, loose, per dozen $1.40.
Turkies aud Geese, per dozen $3.90.
Sugar, eoffee. butter, hard, raola-fsen. "j? 100 $1.18,
TO THE MERCHANTS. TRADERS i FARMERS
OF TENNESSEE,
"ITTEhave made an arrangement, by which wo
f can purchase Groceries in amatl lot, suitable
for the Tennessee trade, at Who'exile priv.
Orders will be filled on the most favorable terms
for Cash, Produce, or prom p",!. on short time.
Savannah is me market for Tennessenns to buy
their Groceries, as well us sell their produce.
HARRIS & CO.
Savannah, Ga. Janl7-3in9
K ROUT. Four barrels Krout, just received and
for sale by ja!7 . W.T.LOWE.
klCKCLSOnebbl. Pickels', just received nnd
for sale by jal7 W. T. LOWK.
' W.AREAD&CO.,
CABIXET-MAKER9 & UNDERTAKERS,
KNOXVILLE, TENN. .
THE subscribers would respectfully eall your at
tention to their stock of CABLSET-WARE now
on hand, and to which they are constantly making
additions, at their Ware-Rooms, South-west corner
of Cumberland and Water Streets, which embraces
nearly all the leading articles of modern tyled Fur
niture now in general use, such as Sofas, Sideboards,
Bureaus, Beadsteadu of every dewiption, Pedestals,
Wardrobes, Centre, Sofa; Card, Exftion, Dining and
Breakfast Tablet, Rocking, Parlor ' and Beeded
Chairs.Book Cases,Fier Glasses,Cradle?,Cribs,etc,etc.
Their Furniture is all made by good workmen, and
of the best material, and in style and quality will
compare favorabe with that manufactured in the
Northern cities, and elsewhere. .
You are .respectfully invited to Call and examine
their stock of Furniture, feeling assured they can ac
commodate you with any article in their line of bu
siness, and on the roost reasonable terms. . ja7-8tf
TT.R. HURLEY,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL DRUGGIST,
LOUDON, TEXX.,
HAS now is stoue, axd ixtesd9 to keep con
stantly on hand a full supply of
VJtL'GS, CIIE3IWALS, PAIXTS& D TE STUFFS
Castor, Sweet, Tanners, Linseed, Cod Lirer, Volatile
and Essential Oil of all kinds; Varnish, Glue, Putty,
SnurT, Cigars and Tobacco. SOAPS of all kinds.
Paint and White-wash Brushes, Sash Tools, Tooth,
Hair, Dusting, Horse, Blacking and Fledi Brushes;
Horse hair Gloves, Trusses, Plain and Linen Pad,
Utcra Abdominal Supporters, Shoulder Braces, Gum
elastic and Silver Catheters; Surgical Instruments,
Amputating case; Trocar and Canselars, Torniquets,
Stomache Tubes, Dental Extracting Instruments; all
kinds of Perfumery, Cosmetics and Hair Oils; Evans'
best Thumb Lancets, Brass and German Silver Spring
Lancets; Fine Letter and Note Paper; Fancy and
Plain Envelopes. In short most of the articles usu
ally kept in Drug Stores, which will be sold on ac
commodating terms, to Merchant", Physicians or
others wanting such articles. Call and examine or
send your orders and they will be promptly filled on
as good terms as anv point in East Tennessee.
London. Dec. 25. ''52 7tf
TEXXDSSEE HOUSES IX GEORGIA.
20O MEX YVAXTEI.
-YTANTED at the TELLICO IROX WORKS, in
W Monroe county, Tennessee, two hundred good
Wood Choppers, to which the cash will be paid. D.
WELCH 4 CO., lately carrying on the above works,
having associated additional partners intend put
ting the work again into full operations and want a
large lot of cordwood immediately
jai7-3m8 WELCH, HARRIS fc Co.
. LAXD WARRAXTS.
I WILL pay tho highest cash price for LAND
WARRANTS, that may be presented ir 1 the next
thirty d.y rn8-8Tj HU. U TINLEY.
. ZTyTJEiXP cte CO.,
FORWARDING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
S.I WI.V.V.III, G.I.
IORWARD with care and dispatch to and from
. the Eastern cities, or to any point desired,
GOODS, PRODUCE AXD MERCHANDISE,
of all descriptions, nnd sell on commission, Produce
and Merchandise. They also purchase to order Gro
ceries, which can be bought on most favorable terms,
in the Savannah market. They solicit your patron
age, and pledge their utmost exertions to give satis
faction. ja6-8-ly
W. F. HARRIS &. CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
MACOX, GA. ja-6mS
JAMES R. BUCHANAN,
Attorney .t Usa-vct,
LOUDOX, TENNESSEE.
Dec. 25, 1S52. Iy7
LANIER & BROTHER,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN -Groceries,
Wines IJquors, Cigars, &e. &c.
Market Street, Nashville, Tesx.
Nov. 13. 1S52. 6m - ' "
Hp HE STEAMER "I.OUDOX"
J is now running between LOUDOX
and KNOXVILLE, in connection with-
the T. nn. A" ieo. Railroad, and offers good
accommodation to PASSENGERS and FREIGHTS.
Ip Ereightj of all descriptions will be delivered at
Cnitia aud Louisville, at 12J cents 100 lb, and at
Knoxville to Messrs. Bearden, Son A Co., Rail Road
Agents, at 15 cent". Down Freights from Knoxrille
to Loudon, 8 cnts 100 lb. . Single packa
ges will not be delivered for less "than 25 cents.
Jan.8. 3 JAQUES A HENXEGAR.
S50RL1VARD.
AXAWAY from the subscriber, living in '
JLl Cherokee county X. C. on the 24th ult.,
a .NEGRO BOY, named WYLEY. Said Xe-
gro is about 19 years of age, but looks some
older has a srood countenance, with a very
ugly sear on his forehead, and has a dark coper col
or. He is about 5 feet, 5 or 6 inches higTi well
made.ncatly trimmed with small feet stands straight
walks quick scd sprightly
jf This Buy writes a tolerably good hand, and
may have Free Papers. Any information will be
thankfully received. I will give the above reward
fur his delivery to me, or confined in anv jail so that
I can get him. Address ISAAC INGRAM,
Valleytown P. O.. Cherokee Co., X. C. , jaS-9-2w
STOVES! STOVES!!
TTT-fiir T TIVT W 1 : A
i'L uu ij. lias i-iticu yv
JY Jefferson and Mary M'Kinney, and ex
tTrct? to keep up a good supply of Cooking,
'it'-"-s Parlor nnd Box Stoves, suitable to warm
any size room, office or shop; also And Irons; Ba
kers, Ovens, Skillets Ac. '
JOHN NIBLO,
SCULPTOR & M ARBLE STONE CUTTER,
A ii'iTrille. lentwxsre.
TOl'LD respectfully inform the citizen?!
of IOliiJOX, vicinity, and of Easr
...: .!. n . k- t .1- . kt vU
nfniit fin2 4)iniliipn1nf fnrMt Hfi iifl E
.... . ........... r ay ,
Monti wilts, Tomb?, Had and Foot Stones, tc.
of the neatest styles and models, and of superior Mar
ble, nnd on fair terms.
Orders thankfully received and promptly
executed. Dee. 25. 1352.
mi-
orme, mrsox a co.
VRE row opening"in the new Brick building,
next the Di'pot. a lare assortment of goods,
suited to the wants of the people. Among which
are Ladies Dress Goods: Cloths, Cnsimers and Vest
ing?: Ready-made Clothing: Traveling Trunks and
Bacs: Saddles, Bridcls and Harness; Hardware,
Building material: Carpenter's Tools: Chainis of all
kinds; Chopping. Hand and Broad Axes; Mil' and
Cross cut Saws; Smith's Bellows; Anvils, Vices Ac.
Picks. Shovels, nor and Guns; Powder and Fuse
Sperm, Linseed and Machinery Oils: White lead Xo, 1
and pure; Paints and all other articles generly found
in Stores if miscellaneous stocks, which thev ofiVr
very low fir Cash or Produce. - novl3-3tf
lOJKM) Hushels Wheat Wanted.
"1T7"E wich to 'iuirchase immediately 10.000 bush-
el? of -rood Merchantable WHEAT, forwbich
wo will give the highest market price delivered at Lou
don. HARVEY t KING.
Dcccn:lpr 11. 1S52. 5
O It EM'.-Several pleasant ROOMS, suitable
for offices Ac, with fire places, to rent by .
j7 ORME. WILSON k Co.
1 fin SACKS Liverpool Salt
nn fnovi.i
for sale hr
ORME, WILSON & Co.
QALT! SALT! This iay received 160 barrels of
5 alt, ami a further supply expected hourly.
London. XovI9 'HAH VET 4 KING.
1 ( BALES J. ?. and 4-4 Brown Domesti?: alio all
1 f kinds of Bleached, Osnabursrs and Drillings,
for sale by mvl3 ORME. WILSON A Co.
20
BOXES prime Cheese, for sale low by
novlS ORME. WILSON A Co.
"1 rf SACKS Bio. Laguira and Java Coffees, now
A Vw arriving and for sale by .
novl.V ORMEy WILSOX A Co.
1 t HllDS. Molasses; also 20 bbls. Re-boiled
A V Xew Orleans Syrup, for sale by
noy!3 ORME. WILSOX A Co.
TTENTIOX RAIL ROAD CONTRACTORS.
You can be supplied with Dericks, for raising
r k, or any other casting, at the shortest notice, by
application to - covl3 II C. L. TINLEY.
. i PIECES PRINTS, of choice st.yies; als
HUu Delains and other Dress Goods now offer
ing and for sale. novl3 ORME, WILSCN A Oo.
AXILLA ROPE, i, . 1-1$ and 1J inch, for
sale by norI3J uiiMi wilson o-
IS II Uaj-rels and half barrels. No. 2 and 8 for
sale by fnoTl3 ORME, WILSOX A Co.
M
F
25
XUN'S PLASTER just received and for sale by
r.ia8 HARVEY A KING.
C l:GARS. New Oiiean, Porto Rieo, Muscayado,
White Coffee, Loaf and Crushed Sugars, now in .
Store end for sale by ORME, WILSON A Co.
SALT! SALT!! 223 barrels of Salt, just receiv
ed, and more expected daily. " -ja
HARVEY A KING.

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