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Jeffersonian Republican. (Stroudsburg, Pa.) 1840-1853, November 13, 1840, Image 2

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JEFFERSONIAN REPUBLICAN
Stroudsburs, Pa. Nov. 13, 1840.
VICTORY.
Terms, $2,00 in advance; $2,25, naif yearly : and $2,50 if not
The first page of our paper will be filled for
several weeks with a narrative of events con
nected with the most interesting period of our
revolutionary history.
ILadics Companion
The Nov. No. of this excellent periodical has
just come to hand; embellished with a beautiful
engraving being a view of the Cemetry at
Mount Auburn. Its prose and poetry are of the
highest order of merit, and will amply repay an
attentivo perusal.
It is worthv of remark, that in the citios on
the seaboard and in all those parts of the coun
try within reach of Custom-house and Post Of
fice influence and dictation, the Harrison vote
lias sensibly decreased within several years
past, and the vast changes which have effected
the overthrow of the administration, have occur
red exclusively among the honest yeomanry,
who have a strong dislike to standing armies,
sub-treasuries and all other humbugs.
"With tho most profound sense of gratitude to
ft beneficent Providence, we have the pleasure
of congratulating our readers on the triumphant
election of William H. Harrison to the Presi
dency of the United States the train-bands of
Martin Van Buren, marshalled by desperate office-holders
have been defeated by the virtue
and intelligence of the real Democracy of the
counntry, and wo may with confidence expect,
that our government which has so long been in
the hands of "old Federalist," will be restored
to its pristine purity. We had designed expres
sing our sentiments on this subject more at large,
when we mot with the subjoined beautiful re
marks from the National Intelligencer the best
and leading paper published in the Union. We
need scarcely add, that they entirely meet our
views.
GRATIFYING INTELLIGENCE.
The Presidential Question Settled.
It has pleased the Almighty to give to the op
pressed people of this misgoverned and suffer
ing country a victory over their weak and wick
ed rulers. The news of yesterday, by announ
cing the glorious triumph in New York, and
that Pennsylvania, too, has finally thrown her
weight into the Whig scale, has decided the
contest, and sealed the fate of the Administra
tion. The reign of incompetency, imposture,
and corruption, is at length arrested, and the
country redeemed. An Administration which
one might almost suppose had said to itself
"Lvil be thou my good, has fallen before the
power of an abused and indignantpeople. Most
heartily do we congratulate every long struggling
patriot throughout the land on this great and
happy event; and when we cast a glance at what
would have been the awful condition of the
country had the power of the Government been
continued and confirmed in the present weak
and wicked hands, we shudder at the view, and
fervently unite with every patriotic heart in
praise and gratitude to the Almighty Disposer
of events for vouchsafing to exempt our beloved
country from a calamity and from consequences
ko dreadful, and for giving to us, in the auspi
cious changa he has granted, a confident hope
of renovated prosperity and happiness for the
country, and of restored respectability, purity,
and dignity to its government.
Breaking Ground.
The defeated party is breaking up, and its
several portions moving away to some attrac
tive point. One part, the "out and outers," real
Loco-focos, are for placing Thomas H. Benton
strongly before the people as the candidate of
that party for the Presidency. This is a fair
start. Mr. Benton deserves so much at least,
ho set the ball in motion; he it was that started
the kind of warfare in which the party has been
engaged; and, though defeated, it owes to him
the consequence which it has even in defeat.
This branch of the party are loud and deep
ngains'.Governor Porter, upon whom they charge
defeat upom him to whom they owe at least
from 8,000 to 10,000 rotes in this state, and the
influence of these votes in other states.
It is probable that little will be heard of a
ronsitlerable portion of those who have for a
few yews past made a loud noise and exercised
a bad influence in the Loco-foco party. That
which kept rhenv together has gone, and they
will go with it. V. S. Gazette.
VIRGINIA.
Wo have returns from 104 Counties. About
20 remain to be heard from. Harrisou.' major
ity tbu far 1712.
MAINE.
The Boston Atlas of Saturday has a post
script whUh contains returns from 301 towns,,
intwhich the Whig gain is -630. The lection
offfoyw to Congress' is yot doubtful.
, 3047
1433
464
217
296
761
937
694
1575
694
1560
744
4205
967
434
3843
213
109
795
718
312
12
1504
439
PENNSYLVANIA.
R So JDm
The Key Stone of ttte Arch broken
loose from Xioco-focoism.
PENNSYLVANIA HAS COME OUT FOR
HARRISON!
Nine Cheers for the Peim State !
The Returns from our own "noble Key
stone" we have taken ftom the American Sen
tinel (Extra) a very respectable Van Buren pa
per published in Philadelphia, and may be de
pended on.
PRESIDENT. 1840,
Counties.- Har. V. B.
Adams, 825
Alleghany,
Armstrong,
Beaver,
Berks,
Bedford,
Bradford,
Bucksi
Butler,
Cambria,
Centro,
Chester,
Clarion,
Clearfield
Clinton, '
Columbia, t
Crawford,
Cumberland
Dauphin,
Delaware,
Eriej
Fayette
Franklin
Green, 1 :
Huntingdon
Indiana,
Jefferson,
Juniata,
Lancaster,
Lebanon,
Lehigh,
Luzerne,
Lycoming,-
xM'Kean,
Mercer,
Mifflin,
Monroe,
Montgomery,
Northampton,
Northumberland,
Perry,
Philadelphia City,
Philadelphia County,
Pike,
Potter,
Schuylkill,
Somerset.
Susquehanna,
Tioga,
Union,
Venango,
Warren,
Washington,
Wayne,
Westmoreland,"
York,
208
661
114
77
913
1736
905
536
46
1343
677
52
43
1102
801
992
836
898
233
389
183
303
463
826
420
180
513'
1926
590
Harrisons maj.
25,465
25,237
228
25,237
NEW JERSEY.
The Broad Seal Respected;
Tho following results of the election in New
Jersey, shews a splendid victory. Truly may
it be said the Broad Seal has been vindicated.
Hudson
Passaic
Bergen
Essex
Morris
Sussex
Middlesex
Somerset
Mercer
Warren
Hunterdon
Cumberlahir
Atlantic
May
Harrison
231 Maj.
3tf0
IRQ
3S4
310
37$
628
GO
1008
624
307
29'P
6m
Van Buren.
300
1761
1051
421
1
GEORGIA.
6794
4500
Whig Majority in tho State, 2,294 '.Being
again-ot ajuu votes since uciooer id.
Partial retur ntitpni I'Michigan, Indiana and
Kentucky, show a gain" for the Whigs,
It is unnecessary to give the names of coun
ties, and it '13 sufficient to say, that we gain in
each one that has been reported. Harrison will
probably have above 6000 majority.
OHIO
In every county heard from, the increase of
the Harrison vote on that of Corwin's is con
siderable. The majority for Old Tip in his
own State will be about 25,000.
NEW YORK.
11,216 Whig Majority.
SIX COUNTIES TO BE HEARD FROM.
The vote stands as far as heard from 22,046
Whig, to 10,831 Loco Foco, six counties to be
heard from, which will increase the majority to
over 15,000 majority.
SEASONABLE HITS CHARACTERISTIC
OF THE CONTEST OF 1810.
A Whig, whose family are all Whigs, with
the exception of one son, upon being asked the
question by the census-taker, "are any of your
family blind, deaf, or dumb ?" Answered, " I
have one son who is blind, ho is a Van Burenite.
" There is an ill-natured, rabid old Loco
foco, who spends most of his time in throwing
stones at the bullfrogs that inhabit a mill-pond
near his residence, because of the constant cry
they keep up for " Tippecanoe Tippecanoe
Tippecanoe !"
If Old Granny Harrison is elected President,
" I'll emigiate to Texas," aaid a Loco-foco office-holder.
-" No doubt of that," remark a
Whig, " you will then not only be carrying out
the principle of your party, but you will also,
like your brother Swartwout, carry off the prin
cipal.
The Loco-focos were but recently building all
their hopes upon the belief, that Gen. Harrisori
would not " come out" as they expressed it.
Well, the General has come out, and Van Bu
ren must go out.
" The Tory papers call Gen. Harrison the
'dumb1 candidate! Hasn't ho spoke loud enough
at the late elections ?"
" The spirit of '76 is aroused," as Van Bu
ren said when he found that seventy-six elec
toral votes had been lost to him.
"If the Sub-treasury is an unwise system,
let it be proved so. Bring forward your wit
nesses." Globe.
The witnesses have gone forward some to
Europe and some to Texas."
"Mr. Dawson, of Michigan, whilo address
ing the meeting at Faneuil Hall, said that it
had been recommended that the blood-hounds
should be transferred from the War to the
Treasury Department to track the defalters
but he thought it an unwise policy, as it was
well known the blood-hound could not track
any one who did not leave a scent (cent) bohind."
" The Globe says, that lightning is most 'apt
to strike buildings containing large quantities
of metallic substance.' If that's the case, there's
very little danger of striking the Treasury of
the United States, but a great deal of striking
the Sub-treasurers.
"Sub-treasurv law is compared to rf man with
mi A
no money, asking to bo trusted for a parse to
hold it."
"Important to Science New Rule Of Arithmetic
To change paper money into metalic. Rule
Substfact the latter from the people, and add it to
the Treasury, and divide the amount among the
office-holders. Nothing will remain."
" If there's any change, it's for us, said a Loco
foco office-holder. Yes, said a Whig, we always
knew that the federal office-holders pocketed the
people's money."
"Why are the people waiting for the beneficial
operation of the Sub-treasury like' physicians los
ing practise' t Because they are losing patience
(patients.")
" The N. Y. Loco-focos talk of setting aside a
day to celebrate the passage of the Sub-treasury
Will each man, after they assemble together, steal
whatever he can lay his hands on in the crowd,
or will they celebrate it by a foot race?"
"Mr. Van Buren loves the people." Globe.
But' the people don't return his passion The
poor man's "crossed."
"The Locofocos complain that General Harri
son once approved a law for whipping poor white
men. It is certain, however, that the good old
General never contemplated having poor whit
folk3 so shockingly whipped as tho poor Loco-
focos of Indiana a'nd Kentucky were upon a le
cent occasion'
HT y 1
"What do you think of the news from Maine ?"
inquired a Whig of a Loeolbco. "Oh! it's just as
I expected! We did'nt hope to carry Maine."
" Indeed what State do you expect to carry J"
'l To be candid with you, it h my opinion that we
are sure of no State, "but the state of rctifacy."
" A traveller passing through one of the town
ships in Dearborn county, Indiana, met a lad about
twelve years of age, when the boy shouted "hurra
for Van Buren!" ThetraVelleralso'respnnded "hur
ra for Vanen!" Bur The boy immediately held out
his hand, and said, " Give me a hp, sir.'7 "V hy,
for what do you want a fip 1" " Why, by jolly,
(says the boy,) if you lived in these diggms, you
would think "it Worth a fip to hollow hurra for Van
Buren." The traveller put whip to his horse,
and was off.
Never have we seen any thing so thoroughly
roused as the Democracy at this time. Globe
Probably you never saw a basket of eels with a
shovel lull of live embers thrown over them.
" You Whigs expect that Harrison will work
miracles!" No, we do not expect that he will
work miracles; but we do expect he will cast out'
devils'
Among tho guns used bv the Whirrs of their
hcenly-acre Convention at Nashville, was one of
enormous dimensions which bellowed like an
earthquake. The carriage supported a flag bear
ing the inscription " Amos Baby Waker;" in al
lusion to Kendall's paltry meanness in attempting
to excite sympathy by the complaint that "his chil
dren had been frequently awakened from their
sleep in fright by the thunders of the cannon used
in celebrating Whig victories."
" When the Whig guns, at dead of night,
Had waked his babes in sad affright,
Hush, my dears, lie still, don't cry,
Says Amos K. with tearful eye.
The Heaven-born resumes his quill,
The babes rest not, but ho lies still-"
The pickpockets have followed General Harri
son. Globe.
Is it not enough for them to abuse him in their
papers! Must they also dog his steps and pick
his pockets,?
South Carolina always votes for a man for the
Presidency, that no other State in the Union will
support. Of course Mi. Van Buren's chances for
South Carolina are bright.
We shall have months of uninterrupted sun
shine. Globe.
Indeed, you will. We shall drive you to the
North Pole where the sun shines six months in
tho year without setting.
The President cannot carry his own State, and
the Vice President cannot carry his. Tell Chap
man to crow.
What a pity Mr. Van Buren has'nt his standing
army of 200,000 to put down the popular rebelion!
Van Buren has been obliged to abandon his
plan of a "standing army;" but he still keeps un
der pay an enormous lying army, headed by Amos
Kendall, with which he has done dreadful execu
tion upon Truth.
Since the late elections the loco-focos have been
heard to remark, very gravely, that they were not
aware that salt river is navigable so high up.
FOKEIGiV ITEMS.
SIXTEEN DAYS LATER.
Attempt upon the life of Louis Phillippc arrest
of the assassin reported defeat of the allied ar
mies destruction of Bey rout confirmed.
The Britannia left Liverpool on the 20th, at
3 o'clock, P. M. She arrived at her dock about
half past three this morning; thus making her
passage frdm dock to dock in 13 days and 15
1-2' hours.
The account of the destruction of the Chinese
forts at Bocca Tigris does not appear to be con
firmed. The most important item of news is the at
tempt upon the life of Louis Phfllippe. This
is attributed by the London papers to the evident
desire of the French King to'smother or keep
down the war enthusiasm of his subjects! The
prisoner, Marius Darmes appears to be a fanatic
of the stamp of Louvel and Alibaud. The in
terrogatories he has undergone have not elicited
from him any admission tending to prove that
he had any accomplices, or that he was a hired
assassin. Although suffering from his wounds,
he has throughout evinced extraordinary ener
gy, and to this moment the only regret he has
manifested is that of not having effected his
criminal purpose. At one question, put to him
by tho instructing judge, tears wero seen to How
into his eyes. "Do not imagine;" said Darmes,
"that these are tears of repentence; if I weep,
it is from despair at having missed my aim."
He was heard to exclaim on another occasion,
"Had I killed the, tyrant, Soliman Pasha would
now be safe, tho French fleet, united with that of
Mehemet Ali, would have sunk that of the incen
diaries or Beyrout, and Egypt would bo freed."
"The despatches," says the Moniteur Paris
icn, "brought direct from Alexandria to Toulon,
and which are dated the 3d inst. hare arrived
in Paris. According to those despatches, the
English ships were continuing to bombard tho
small towns of the Syrian coast, and were land
ingTurks there. The latter had occupied Seide,
Caiffa, and even Tripoli. Soliman Pasha re
mained master of Beyrout, and Ibrahim had ta
ken up a strong position above tho Turkish.
No decisive event was known at Alexandria
up to the 3d instant.
We find no change in the price of cotton.
The com market was falling off.
DESTRUCTIVE FIRES IN MANCHESTER.
An extensive conflagration broko out in Pe
ter street, Manchester, Eng., on Thursday night,
Oct. loth, in airmilding five stories high, ores
pied by II.-Hobson, an individual extensively
engaged in the carrying business between this
town and Leeds The wind blowing in a north
erly direction, the flames were carried across
(the street, and placed ihe W ellmgton Hotel and
the Museum of the Natural History Society iu
imminent peril. About 7 o'clock, however, the
fire was got under. Considerable damage wa
done to the engine manufactory of Messrs. Sharps
& Roberts, to the carrying concern of Mirtin &
Walker, the upholstery of Mr. Lee, and severs I
other establishments. " Hobson wa insured to
an amount which it is thought would cover his
loss, viz: .3000.
'fhe Ministerial evening organs contain tho
following most important intelligence
"The person of the King was fired at this
evening, at six o'clock, at the moment when ho
passed on the quav of the Tuileries to return to
St. Cloud.
Neither the King nor any of the persons who
accompanied him were touched.
The guilty man was arrested. IIo admits
his crime."
Our Paris correspondent writes, that the King
was fired upon just at the same spot that the wo
man threw the stone, into the King's carriage
some time since. The assassins name is Darmes,
and he is said to be a native of Marseilles, about
40 years of age. He is reported to bo wound
ed in the hand by the concussion. The weapon
is alleged to have been a carbine. Another ver
sion is, that he is undoubtedly insane. The
news spread like wildfire through Paris, and
groups were collected on the Boulevards, sug
gesting the probable motive of this infamous at
tempt. Trow the Now Orleans Ticayune.
RECORDER'S COURT.
Second Municipality.
Presidential Election. Frank Smith,
and Thomas Redden were up before Recorder
Baldwin on Sunday morning. They wero ar
rested for being noisy and intoxicated
"Smith," said the Recorder, "about what did
you and Reddin quarrel?"
"Vy, about the old thing, your honor," said
Smith.
"What do you call the old thing?" said tho
Recorder.
"Vy, this hero presidential helection," said
Smith.
"O, you differ in politics, do you?" said tho
Recorder.
"Certainly we do," said Smith "he is a Rab
bit loco foco and I is a vig."
"A what?" said tho Recorder.
"A wiolent politician and in favor of Wan
Buren" said Smith. "But I'll tell your honor
as how it is. Ve both lives in the same yard,
and venever I passes him ho says there goes
Hard Cider; there is one of the party wot aint
got no principles; there's a supporter of the man
wot's been made brave by certificates and not
by his swordj and he goes on in that ere vay
vich no good vig can stand. Yen he finds the
other vigs out what live in the yard and the lo
cofocos at home, he is sure to take the wote and
then he calls it a Wan Buren victory and a sign
of the times, and all that. The fact is, your
honor, if the feller vasn't looking out for an of
fice I doesn't think he'd be half as patriotic as
he is'
"Reddin' said the Recorder "is your con
duct such as Smith describes it?"
"Not a bit on it," 3aid Reddin "if I was- to
bo let alone I'd never do nothing to nobody, but
he's heternally talking politics. Yen my old
voman locks the door and goes out, ho makes a
fox on it vith chalk and writes underneath it.
this here is sly Reynard from Kinderhook, vot I
U3 iui ouuic uniu in lilt; xjuiiuuu (iuuiuuibdi rjrl -
dens, but now is in the Menargerie at Vasbing-
ton; lie s the most cunning hammal vol a known
to Naturalists. This is not all, your honor.
Ven I vants to sleep at night I'm bio wed if 1 can
get a wink, he kicks up such a rumpus, singing
Harrison songs the whole time and crowing
like a reg'lar rooster. I have challenged him
oirer and over again, but I never can get him to
toe the" mark no how.
"Do you know," said tho Recorder, "that by
challenging him you have been guilty of inci
ting to a breach of the peace.
"I doesn't mean a duel your honor," said Red
den, "but to a discussion of principles;- but I'm
blamed if I don't believe he haint got any."
"But can't you both retain your respective
political opinions without quarreling?" said tho
Recorder.
"Veil then said Redden, "your honor must
bind him over not to sing Arrison songs between
the hours often o'clock at night and six o'clock
in the morning, and not to be frightening my
children out of bed by firing off that old rusty
musket in celebration of wictories when he haint
gained none. Yes, and prewent him your hon
or," continued Redden, "from making his big
dog stand on his hind legs in my presence, and ,
saying, as he points to him, 'hero is one f '
Wan Buren's standing harmy;' nor I wont stand f
no more from him about negro testimony causo
it's all gammon." iW
Onf tho part of Smith it was provided that
Redden was not to call him a hard cider cask s
nor a worshipperof log cabins an v mor e. The i
mauc mutual promises to act wuii more forbear
ance towards ono another in future, nnd to (lis
play a greater degree of political charity uu
they have evinced heretofore, and wero discharged.
The New York Courier sava: - U waa pla
ted a few weeks since, a thi ismasK of Mr
Van Buren to a gontlena,u of this city on a vis
it to Washington, tat he was "yet to experience
tho first moment of uneasiness in regard to hi
ra-oiecuon io i&o Presidency." Strange as tb i
sensation may be, we presume that our wort-
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