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Jeffersonian Republican. (Stroudsburg, Pa.) 1840-1853, June 24, 1852, Image 2

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Whig National Convention
Baltimore, June 16th.
During all the morning an immense
throng of delegates and others -were pour
ing into the city, and the greatest excite- j
ment was manifested to see and hear cv- .
erythiug that was in any way interesting i
at the present exciting moment. j
At half-past ten the members of the j
Convention began to assemble in the Hall j
preparatory to the time of opening, which
is fixed at 12 o'clock.
The Hall is beautifully decorated, much
more so than when the late Democratic
Convention met. The platform is con
structed in the centre, is covered with
carpeting. !
The delegates from the Southern States
held a meeting this morning and unani- ;
mously adopted a platform, which em
braces the Compromise in all its parts as ;
a finality. j
It was referred to a Committee of one
from each State in the Convention.
The delagation from Massachusetts sub
scribed to the platform, and it ts believed ;
the Convention will finally adopt it, al-!
though an animated struggle will undoubt- J
edly tike place before this will be accom- J
plished. Many of the Northern members j
have abroad expressed a decided oppo
sition to it.
The whole city presents one living mass,
and the excitement is intense.
At 12 o'clock the Convention was pre
liminarily organized by selecting Hon.
George Evans, of Me., as Chairman, and
Messrs. Upton, of Louisiana, and Bryan,
of North Carolina, as Secretaries.
A motion was made to appoint a Com
mittee of one from each State to se
lect permanent officers for the Convention.
The motion for the appointment of a
committee of one from each state to se
lect permanent officers, was adopted.
Each delagation to name its member and
committee. The member from Pennsyl
vaniu is Win. Jessup.
On motion a committee of one from
each state was appointed on Credentials.
Mr. Kunkle being the member from
this state.
On motion the Convention then adjourn
ed until six o'clock, P. M.
At six o'clock, the Convention re-assembled.
After considerable discussion
touching the propriety of adopting Eulcs
for the Government of the Convention, be
fore a regular organization had been af
fLttii, the Committee on Permanent Of
fic -r reported for President, JOHN G.
CilAPMAN, of Maryland, with 31 Vice
Prj iients, and 13 Secretaries. The Vice
Pre-ilent from Pennsylvania is John
trohm. Considerable debate took place
on the proper mode of taking the question
upon the adoption of the lleport. It was
decided to take it by states. The call of
the States was then commenced, but was
tuperseded as unnecessary, and the Be
port was adopted unanimously.
Mr. Chapman, on taking the Chair
made an excellent address. Prayer was
then offered up by the Rev. Thomas H.
Stockton.
The Committee on Credentials not be
ing read- to report, and there being no
proixmiiity oi tneir speeciny onnging their
Kouerous duties to a close, the Convention
mdjourned to Thursday morning.
SECOND DAY.
The President called the Convention to
jrder at 12 o'clock, when proceedings
were opened with a prayer by Rev. Dr.
J Atkinson, Episcopalian.
J here was a lull attendance. Heat
nost oppressive, fans waving in all direc
tions.
Engravings of Scott, Fillmore and
Webster are suspended from the walls.
The Committee on Credentials reported
Ithatthey had made considerable progress,
ind asked leave to sit during the session
)f the Convention which was granted. j
The proceedings of yesterday having i
jeen read, Messrs. Cabell and Brans- ;
fORD severally introduced resolutions
laving in view the completion of the or-
Ionization, by adopting rules for the gov-,
Eminent of the Convention.
The resolution of Mi-. Welch for the
the same purpose, offered 3resterda' was :
withdrawn, when after a debate, the fol-1
lowing, proposed by Mr. Botts, was a-
Eyopted.
liesoivea, l uat on every vote on wincn 1
division shall be ordered, each State J
mhvM be entitled to as many votes, and no
nore, as such State is entitled to in the
Electoral College, and that the rules of
the House of Representatives be adoiited
cis the rules of this Convention, so far as
the same may be applicable. j
On the adoption ol the above resolution,
tbere was long continued applause. j
The President made an appeal to
rentlemen to observe order. He trusted '
jthc utmost silence would be generally ob-
served. Continued demonstrations ot ap- ;
tplause were unbecoming the dignity and j
leharacter of American citizens. We are, .
lhe said, apt to be led away by our feel-.
lings, but let us in future be governed j
ITiv ntir indVment.
Mr. Dundan (.Louisiana; ojtered the ;
following Resolutions: I
JSxsolved. That a Committee, to consist j
of one member from each State in the '
5 . t I . i 1
Union, represented in uns conventions dc ;
appointed, whose duty it shall be to draft :
a series of resolutions expressive of the J
sentiments of the Whigs of the Union on j
the great doctrines cherished by them; or, J
icv-r.rwise, a Platform of Principles to be
maintained by the Whigs in the coming
campaign.
Resolved, That the Members of said
Committee be selected by the Delegation
from each State represented, appointing
its own Member, and the Committee to
appoint its own Chairman.
Resolved, That this Convention will not
proceed to ballot for or otherwise nomi
nate a Candidate for President, of Vice
President, until the said Committee shall
have reported, and this Convention shall
have taken final action on the said report.
The Committee appointed for the pur
pose, reported a Whig Platform, as fol
follows :
The Whigs of the United States, in
The following is the result of the dif-
.ferent ballotfift'gs
Ballots,
1st
2d
3d-
4th
5th
6th
7th
8th
9th
10th
11th
Convention assembled, firmly adhering to ; 12th
tho great conservative principles by which
they are controlled and governed, and
now as ever relying upon the intelligence :
of the Ameican people, with an abiding
confidence in their capacity for self-gov-'
eminent, and their devotion to the Con
stitution and the Union, do proclaim the
following as the political sentiments and
determination for the establishment and
maintenance of which their national or
ganization as a party was affected:
First. The Government of the United
States is of a limited character, and it is
confided to the exercise of powers expres
sly granted by the Constitution, and such
as may be necessary and proper for car
rying the granted powers into full execu
tion, and that all powers not granted or
necessarily implied are expressly reserved
to the States respectively and to the peo
ple. Second. The State G ovcrnments should
bo held secure to their reserved rights,and
the General Government sustained on its
constitutional powers, and that the Union
should be revered and watched over as
the palladium of our liberties.
Third. That while struggling freedom
everywhere enlists tho warmest sympathy
of the Whig party, we still adhere to the
doctrines of the Father of his Couutry,as
announced in his Farewell Address, of
keeping ourselves free from all entangling
alliances with foreign countries, and of
never quitting our own to stand upon for
eign ground; that our mission as a repub
lic is not to propagate our opinions, or
impose on other countries on form of gov
ernment, by artifice or force; but to teach
by example, and show by our success,
moderation and justice, the blessings of
self-goverument, and the advantages of
free institutions.
Fourth. That, as the people make and
control the Government, they should o
bey its constitution, laws and treaties, as
they would retain their self-respect, and
the respect which they claim and will en
force from foreign powers.
Fifth. Revenue sufficient for the expen
ses of an ecomoinical administration of the
13th
14th
15th
16th
17th
13th
19th
20th
21st
22d
23d
24th
25th
26th
27th
28th
29th
30th
31st
32d
33d
34th
35th
36th
37th
3Sth
39th
40thf
41st
42d
43d
44th
45th
46th
47th
18th
49th
50th
51st
52d
53d
3-Y
o
131
.133
133
134
130
133
131
133
133
135
134
134
134
133
133
135
132
132
132
132
133
132
132
133
133
134
134
134
134
134
134
134
134
. 134
134
13G
1 36
136
134
132
132
134
134
133
133
134
135
137
139
142
142
143
159
133
131
131
130
133
131
133
131
131
130
131
130
130
130
130
129
131
131
131
131
131
130
130
129
128
128
128
128
128
128
123
128
128
126
128
127
128
127
128
126
129
128
128
128
127
127
129
124
122
i oo
120
119
112
1
a.
C
cr.
r-
a
29
29
29
29-
30
29
28
28
29
29
28
28
28
29
29
28
20
29
29
29
28
30
30
30
31
30
30
30
30
39
30
30
29
28
23
23
28
29
30
32
32
30
30
30
32
31
29
30
30
28
29
25
solution expresivc of sympathy and re
gard, and that his; memory will never
die.
The resolution was adopted by acclama
tion. Simeon Draper responded for N.-York,
pledging that State for the nominee.
The Convention then
to the nomination of
President. Upon the second ballot, Wm.
A. GRAHAM, of North Carolina, was
nominated.
After the nomination of Mr. Graham,
! Mr. II. W. Miller of North Carolina, rose
and thanked the Convention for the hon
or done his State, and pledged 10,000 ma
jority for the ticket.
A resolution was adopted thanking the
officers and the Committee of Arrange
ments, and authorizing the President to
inform the nominees of their election.
After speeches from the President and
others, the Convention adjourned sine die
Coal. The Pottsville Miners' Journal
1
4
1
1
21
On the 36th ballot Bates received 1
vote. On the 37th, Douglass (of Cal.)
received 1 vote. On the 36th there were
3 blanks, and on the 37th, 38th, and 39th
ballots, 2.
On the 40th ballot, Choate (of Mass.)
received 1 vote.
Bates, of Missouri, got one vote on the
33d ballot, from New York. California
gave one for Crittenden. Three votes for
Government, in time of peace, ought to be farittenuen. on the "34th ballot, were re-
derived from a duty on imp'orts, and not j ceieve(i fr0:n Illinois,
from direct taxation; and in laying such j A motion to adjourn was made after
duties, sound policy requires a just dis- . tlic 34th bnllot by :,Ir jerinctt, 0f 7sTew
crimination, whereby suitable encourage- , York, and not ag'reed to ayes 76, nays
ment may be aftbieded to American in- , 217, a
dustry, equally to all classes, and to all j A resolution was offered by a Dele
parts of the country. j gatc from Alabama to declare the nomi-
Sizth. The Constitution vests m Con- 1 ljatjon unanimous,
gress the power to open and repair bar- j Mr payton rym j.) aac an eloquent
bors, and remove obstrustions irom navi- SpCeCD) setting forth the character and
gable rivers, whenever improvements are j serv;ces 0f tQ nominee, giving an elo
necessary for the common defense, and j quent cui0y 0I1 gcotfcj ana appealing to
for the protection and facility of connner- ' the goutll -n bejiaif 0f an earnest sup
ce with foreign nations, or among the port Alabama and other Delegates from
Statcs-saiJ improvements being, in every the goutl hayc stated that the adoption
instance, national and general in tneir . of the pi:itform rcmoved their objections
character.
Seventh. The Federal and State Gov
ernments are parts of one system, alike
necessary for thecommonprosperit3',peace
and security, and ought to be regarded a-
like with a cordial, habitual and nnmov
to vote against bcott.
Mr. Jones, Tenn., read a letter from
Scott, dated yesterday, sayiug :
" Having the honor to be a candidate
of the Whig Convention, I will accept the
nomination if tendered to me with the
able attachment. Respect for the auth- -ninffnrm l.,:, An.vn w rhnvmih'nn
ority of eacb and acquiescence m the just Louisiana then pledged herself to the
constiutional measures of each, are duties nominee. North Carolina came in unan
required by the plainest considerations of imousiy New-York responded through
national, state and individual welfare. ! Mr Babcock, from Mr. Fillmore's District,
Eight. That the series of measures sayi the nomination of Gen. Scott will
known as the Compromise, including the ive -,uore joy to Mr FiHmore than his
Fugitive Slave law, are received and ac- own name.
quiesced in b' the lng party ol the
United Status as a settlement in principle
and substance a final settlement 01 the
dangerous and exciting subjects which
they embrace, and so far as the Fugitive
Slave law is concerned, we will maintain
the same and insist on its strict enforce
ment until time and experience shall de
monstrate the necessity of further legisla
tion against evasion or abuse, but not
impairing its present efficiency, and we
deprecate all future agitation of the Slave
ry question as dangerous to our peace,
and we will discountenance all efforts at
the renewal or continuance of such agita
tion in Congress or out of it, whenever,
wherever or however the attempt may be
made, and will maintain this system of
measures as a policy essential to the na
tionality of the Whig party and the in
tegrity of the Union.
Mr. Asiimun stated that these resolu
tions had been agreed to by the commit
tee by an almost unanimous vote. They
were immediately considered by the Con
vention, Mr. Ciioate, of Massachusetts,
having led off in an exceedingly able and
eloquent speech in their support. The
debate was then continued, in an anima
ted and eloquent strain, by Mr. Ander
son, of Ohio, Mr. Botts, of Virginia, Mr.
AncnER, of Virginia, Mr,
New Jersey, and others.
was the adoption of the resolutions by the
Convention by a very large majority
Yeas 227, Nays 65. This important
question having been thus happily dispos
ed of, the way was cleared to the main
business of the Convention namely, the
nomination of Candidates for President
and Vice President of the United States;
and the Convention accordinglyproceoded
to voic for a Presidential rondidate.
Dayton, of
The result
Mr. Grantland, of Georgia, announced
Georgia for the nominee.
Half-past one Guns are now being
fired from Federal Hill in honor of the
nomination.
Mr. Bryan, of S. C, responded on be
half of the Delegation of that State, that
Scott had endorsed the platform, and
South Carolina, endorses Scott.
Mr. Stewart, of California, promised an
overwhelming majority for Scott.
The Chairman of the Alabama Dele
gation left, his Delegation to answer for
themselves.
How lie H-aslies Iiis Friends.
Wo Afrnnt the following from tho. Inst.
i Extracts nf Ipltfirs frnm Juttn-o S!in.. -
W;a-os-Bfirrn. Farmer, a Uass naner. one " 7 "-V:. . " -S : " 7 ,
of the most ably-edited and independent
papers in the county.
An Amendment of the Constitution
Cambridge, April 24, 1844
I have read the prospectus with great pleag
ure; and entirely approve the plan, if jt Ca
or the nominee. ANAMENDMENTOF tiieuonstitutiu OIIiyobtain lhe public patronage longenOUBh
sn decided to proceed j Abolishing Legislative Assemblies, and large enough, and securely enough t
o ninilntnTn. T V miiTO f!nM AfrtVArV A T.TTT A XTI TSTATl- attain itS trilft Rtvlc. It will rnnlnUi. r '
41 uuuuiuabu 1U1 1 t lllio vu.u;uu.i 1 1 i . j "in buuiiiuuLt; in 3n
LISHING AN EXECUTIVE COUNCIL, TO- eminent cegree to give a healthy tone, not
GETHER WITH THE GOVERNOR, SHALL f l"6' but l Public Pinion.
' mn K will enable us to possess, in a mnrlMi
FRAME ALL LAWS TO BE SUBMITTED TO a se,ecl fy q
THE ADOPTION OR REJECTION OF THE tions of the age. It will do more: it will rc-
People. Such is the proposition placed j deem our periodical literature from tho Ta'
i r . 1 .11 1 . i i . ,lc fo
under our nag to-uay, to Do Kept mere as proacn 01 peing aevoieu to ngru and super-
long as we shall print until some better
plan shall be devised, or until the funda
mental law of our Commonwealth shall
be changed to conform therewith. It was
the common, nay universal remark of
every man with whom we conversed who
had visited the seat of Government last
winter, that sucb a diabolical mass of I
ignorance and vice never before congre
gated together in the same capacity, as
was assembled there last session. That
says :
"Prices are firm, with an upward ten-
ten cents advance for a prime article of fol spectacle been presented
licial reading, 1o transitory speculating ,
sickly and ephemeral sentimentalities, and
false and extravagant sketches of life' and
character, JOSEPH STORY.
New York, 7th May, 1844.
I approve very much of the plan of the
" Living Age;" and if it be conducted with
the intelligence, spirit and taste that the
prospectus indicates, (of which I have no
reason to doubt,) it will be one of the most
instructive and popular periodicals of the
day. JAMES KENT. '
it was bad enough in former year3, but J
that at no period had an equally disgrace-
lhis was
Washington, 27 Dec. 1815,
j In all the I'enodcal Journals devoted u
literature and science which abound in Eu
roDe and in this cnuntrv. th?Q annm.i
White Ash Coal, and by the 1st of July 't especially remarked of the House, the lo me the moat useful It contains indeed
the best quality of White Ash Coal will S?"atc hg. exhibited the superior , the exposition only of the current literature
command two dollar ner ton in this re-' wisdom of killing outright between one ol the English language, but this, by its im.
Moil On the Is of Julv Advance of' two liundred bills Passed hJ thc for- n,e"selexter,lf?hnd comprehension, includes a
gion. un the 1st or dui an auance ot , r . portraiture of the human mind in the utmost
ten cents per ton will take place on the i ,juuj'' , expansion of the present age.
Canal and liailroad, which will cause an
advance of about 25 cents per ton at llich
mond. On the 1st of September the rates
J. Q.ADAMS.
PHOSPECTUS.
This work is conducted in the spirit of
JBT Clearfield county is likely to be
come a sort of Texas, the Legislature hav-
will again advance ten cents on the Rail- ing legislated it out of White's judicial Littel's Museum of Foreign Literature,(which
road and Canal, and another advance of district into Knox's who it is rumored ' was favorably received by the public for
r,n or m foi-. ninn of aiStUCt mt KnOX S' lt 15 rumorea twenty years,) but as it is twice as large.and
refuses to accept it, consequently no courts appears so often, we not only give spirit and
50 to 25 cents per ton will take place at
llichmond, Freights to the East will also
advance beyond the present high point
towards the close of the season.
The Crops.
JJj3 The Augusta (Maine) Fanner
thinks the hay crop must be a greatly di
minished one, and the corn crop looks
still more doubtful of ever coming to 111a
turitty. Great complaints are heard on
all sides that the seed corn has failed to
come up, and many have planted their
fields the second time with the hope that
it would yet germinate and come forth in
season. Either the seed corn of last year's
growth was not sufficiently ripened to in
sure its germination, or the excessive dry
weather has had rather an uncommon ef
fect; for a great part of that which was
planted has rotted.
gST-The Western-Rew;Te(Ohio) Chron
icle, says: From present indications, there
is to be a large drop of wheat, and grass
will be unprecedented. There is some
danger of damage from "lodging," owing
to the luxuriant growth. Apple? promise
to be ven' abundant, and peaches and
other fruit in moderate quantities. Corn
planting was very late, and there is much
complaint that the seed did not germinate,
yet if July and August should be favor
ble we may anticipate a reasonable crop
of corn.
S?The Texas papers say that there
never was a better prospect of a large
cane crop on the Brazos. The cotton,
although retarded by the resent cold
weather, has generally recovered, and
are held there.
The Tribune in commenting upon the
fact that our Americans abroad, all as
sume to be Colonels at least, and on the
folly and absurdity of their pretensions,
gives thc following capital hit :
'Of what rank are you?' asked a brisk
Frenchman of a sensible
lresnness to 11 ny many tilings wnicn were
excluded by a month's delay, but while thus
extending our scope and gathering a greater
and more attractive variety, are able so tn
increase the solid and substantial part of our
literary, historical, and politcal harvest, as
fully lo satisfy the wants of the American
reailer.
The elaborate and stately Essays of the
Edmburg Quarterly, and other Reviews; and
BlackicooiVs noble criticisms on Poetrv. his
1 ankee, with keen political Commentaries, highly wrought
whom he had struck up a traveller's inti- Tale5" and Tlvid descriptions of rural and
. , , mountain scenery; and the contributions to
macy. 'I am a private, was the answer. Lileraturei History, and Common Life, by
'Thank Heaven V was the reply, ' that 1 the sagacious bpoctutor, the sparkling Ex
have found an American who is not an
officer ; I never saw one befor-e.'
ammer, the Judicious Athenantnn, the busy
and industrious Literary Gazeette, the sensi
ble and comprehensive Britannia, the sober
and respectable Christian Observer; these
are intermixed with the Military and Naval
reminiscences of the united Service, and with
the best articles of the Dublin University,
New Monthly, Eraser's, Tait's, Ainswonh's
Hood's, & Sporting Magazines, and of Cham
bers1 admirable Journal. We do not consid-
Agreciiig to Disagree.
We learn from a friend in Lancaster
that, on Saturday, a Locofoco ratification
or what was intended to be a ratifica
tion meeting was held at that place, at er it beneath our dignity to borrow wit and
which Mr. Buchanan was to have spoken vvisi!otn from Pu,nck; anrd', whuen ,h'nk l
r good enough, make use of the thunder of The
but refused to attend. Col. Irazer, the ( Times. We shall increase our variety by im
leader of the anti-Buchanan faction, was portations from the continent of Europe", and
called for, and took tho stand, but Wl,on T SnS-
he commenced speaking, a general uproar ' and A frica into our neighborhood and will
' .
meeting opposing, the : 8,reaiiy ulllP v our LOecVons a er-
UlJUilLOf X i.UT&llLrtO) UIIU X Wlllll lUilj V IIU till
ensued, half the
! other half supporting him in vain. The
anti-Buchananites shouted, Put him out'
'Down with him' 'Turn him out'
Benedict Arnold' with other elegant,
phrases of objurgation; and these ivcro
parts of the world so that much more than
ever it now becomes-every intelligent Amer
ican to be informed of the condition and
changes of foreign countries. And this not
onlv because of their nearer connection with
ourselves, but because the nations seem to be
crop bids fair to be
1
a larjxe
hnctpriincT. thrnnah a rnniH nrnrps nl rhnnnM
I the intermingled 'with hisses and all sorts of j t0 some ew state of thingsrvvhich the merely
co7 has suffered f mo from tho drought, prevailed for some time; and at length, ! cSSSrSSte
but is in a lorward condition, lhe pros- ( apprehensions of a riot being entertained, 1 whole world,) and Voyages and Travels, will
pect for large crops is very good in that scycral of thc j. hts extinuigll. be favorite matter for our selections; and, in
' , , . zL. , eeneral, we snail systematically and very
! ed and the room partially cleared, innai-; ial acQuaint our readers with the creat de-
tneir wheat Harvest. Judcin from thc , ouci:uuu 111 - A While we asoire to make the Lieinn- A
' .. i i . .. .1. . . . a a-
section.
.v-wpi 7,. rpi rr,. n 1 1 J wl"1'"' '"" , jully acquaint our readers with the great de-
JGIhe Foil Tobacco Times says: Our , Q1, OTwl ii,: ! n?rc,n nfr,i,. .un..?
n 1-1 , . IV tliv; kJUVlllX ua.T CCUb , UUU UbUUtuir uunumui ' """n" uuuiu, niiuuui CIIIUCIT
iarmers are Dusilv encrased nreDarinnr tor ; J ... . .
sily engaged preparin
neglecting our own.
appearance of some fields we presume resumed his speech, and the meeting went desirable to all who wish to keep themselves
that by the middle of next week the liar- 1 on as usual. The Colonel was delighted , informed of the rapid progress of the move-
nienl to otatesmen, Divines, JLawyers, and
Physicians to men of businhss and men of
leisure it is still a stronger object to make
it attractive and useful to their Wives and
Children. We believe that ve can thus do
some good in our day and generation ; and
hope to make the work indispensable m ev
ery well-informed family. We say indispen
sable, because in this day of cheap literature
it is not possible to guard against the influx
vest will have been fairly commenced in
our country.
UjThe Marlboro' Gazette says: The
wheat crop in this vicinity gives promise
of a fine harvest. Nearly three-fourths
of the tobacco crop has been planted.
Plants have been abundant, and, with fa
vorable weather, a fair crop may be
made.
The North Branch Loan of Penn
sylvania. The North Branch Canal
loan was awarded on the 15th inst., to
that Buchanan had been shelved, and he
proceeded to eulogize Gen. Pierce. Our
informant says that there was no enthusi
asm manifested in favor of the candidates,
and considers that Pierce is a dead weight
among the Democracy of that region.
BS? The after-piece to the Locofoco
" - &
ratification meeting says the Independent of what is bad taste and vicious in morals,
Whig was enacted yesterday morning at il! an? other wa' lhan by furnishing a suffi
7 o'clock, at the corner of Centre SqiTare ' cienn ITLrn'm161' J f
i i mpntnl nnrl moral annntite must lift orntitipcl.
and vest Kmc Street. The amusement
was rare,
l.i i. i ii. - nr tt .1
Messrs. U.K. lusher, ot Philadelphia, , -r, , m,
T. , . ' ,r ' one of the leading Buchanan men. lhe
Duncan, Sherman & Co., New lork, and pr0Ceedings were interrupted by the in
George Peabody, of London. Two hun-1 terference of several outsiders, consequcnt
dred thousand dollars were taken at four ly, neither party can claim the victory.
and a-half per cent, per annum, and six
hundred and fifty thousand at five per
cent, per annum. It will be recollected jq"cw Hampshire,
that a lesser rate m interest, instead of a , Vermont,
mental and moral appetite must be gratified.
Wfi himn thnt. hv 'lainnmnincr lt,p mlirnt
consisting of Several well direc- from the chaff.' bv nrovidinc abundantly for
J , J , - n
Population of the United Status.
Maine,
Massachusetts,
llhode Island,
Connecticut,
New York,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
i.
premium, was requested from bidders.
ll O 1 k n n una o t rri iff Ion1 o civ rm l
ississippi responded heartily in favor . r
of the nominee. loan
One of the Massachusetts Delegates , ti--pi t i J7i r L r -i
resnonded in fn.vor of Kr-nr.f mm?RinW 1 L JudSeS f thc CoUrt of Plul
the largest majority of any State in the adelPhi county have declard their in-; Maryland,
union. leiuion 10 prevent) tuesaic oi aruentspirits Delaware,
The responses from the South have ; hereafter on Sunday. Their determina- ' District of Columbia, -
caused considerable enthusiasm, and as tion bas causcd considerable feelin a
WWVM ww lpUliUUi UVUiUI IIVIV ,1 i ill -l.i n
jvcn i mong those who will be immediately af-
Georcia, through Mr. Dawson, respon- fccted thereby
dfd. mid nrnniisod tluit the AVrliinrs of
Georgia would accept Scott on the Whig ! In Tennessee, a,man has been con-
platform, and would do their best to elect demned to five years' imprisonment for
him.
Indiana promised to respond to the
nomination by acres of ratification meet
ings and a score of thousands of majority.
marrying his niece.
Tr:nj t?:ii tt nas oeeu mvcnieu ov iur. oeawaru
honor
Death to Bats. We learn from an
; exchange, that an ingenious instrument
by Mr.
ster felt constrained with his fellow Dele- j printer, at Indianapolis, Indiana, which
gates to stick to Scott, knowing him to
be the only candidate for whom they
could promise a positive and glorious ma
jority, larger than that given to Taylor
or Harrison,
Other States responded.
Mr. Botts announced that this would
probably be the last general Convention
of the Whig party during the lifetime of
Hencry Clay, and therefore offered a re-
will be death to rats. To the treadle on
which the bait is placed, is attached an
iron lover, communicating with an wire
spring, to which is fastened a sharp in
strument, which revolves rapidly when
the treadle is touched, hitting the rat be
tween she peepers and knocking it six or
eight feet from the trap which resets it
self instantly for icotlw rat
' Virginia,
1 North Carolina.
South Carolina,
Georgia,
Florida,
Alabama,
Mississippi,
Louisianna,
Texas,
Ohio,
Michigan,
Illinois,
Indiana,
Kentucky,
Tennessee,
Arkansas,
Missouri,
Iowa,
Wisconsin,
Oregon,
Minnesota,-;-- :
New Mexico y-
United States
X
the immanination. and bv a larae collpntinn
of Biography, Voyages, Travels, History,
1 and more solid matter, we may produce a
work which shall be popular, while at the
asme time it will aspire to raise the stand
ard of public taste.
The Living Age is published overy Sat
urday, by E. Littell & Co., corner Tremonl
and Uromfield sts., Boston ; Price 12 1-2
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vance. Ramittances for any period will be
thankfully received and promptly attended to.
Postage Free.
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' remit in advance, directly lo the office of pub
lication at Boston, the sum of bi.v Dollars,
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as long as shall be equivalent to the cost of
Dostace : thus virtually carrying out the
oi'Kor; ! plan of sending every man's copy to him
rrcn ! Postage Free; placing our distant subscrt-
hers on the same footing as mose nearer 10
us: and making the whole country oorneigh-
808,903 borhood.
We hope for such luture cnange in ine
law, or the interpretation thereof, as will
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Qfl'MOo and jt be worln while for subscribers or
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l,00,uo tiey may have, and thus greatly enhance
vi,aw . their value.
Binding. We bind the work in a uniform,
strong, and good style; and where customers
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