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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, September 27, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1904-09-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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-A Pioneer
WA NT AD
Will Do It.
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VOLUME 2. NUMBER 136.
JAPS PLANS
APPARENT
Movement in Progress Near Muk
den Intended to Turn the
Russian Left.
Outpost Fighting is Continuous,
Resulting in Many
Casualties.
WAR DISPATCHES SUMMARIZED.
A dispatch from General Kuropatkin
gives further assurance that the Jap
anese movement now in progress has
for one of its objects the turning of
the Russian left. He says a large
force of Japanese is advancing from
Liaoyang by way of Taiche.
Sharp skirmish fighting is of daily
occurrence, an outpost affair at Inpu
resulting in many casualties.
A dispatch from Mukden says doubts
are beginning to be felt as to the pos
sibility of a winter campaign.
FRESH TROOPS ARRIVING
REASON FOR LONG DELAY IN THE
JAPANESE ADVANCE ON
MUKDEN.
St. Petersburg, Sept. 27.The cause
of the extreme deliberation in the
Japanese advance on Mukden is ex
plained by a dispatch received from
General Kuropatkin, which indicates
that Field Marshal Oyama has not a
concentrated his forces. Fresh troops
are constantly arriving at Bentsia
putze, while others which recentb
reached .Liaoyang are marching up the
Taitse river to Sianchan These rein
forcements presumably come fiom
Japan. As soon as the fourth Japan
ese army at iSiauchan is sufficient^
strong, it is now evident, the Japanese
intend to resort 10 their favorite hang
ing tactics, move a formidable array
against Kuiopatkin's left and compel
the evacuation of Sinisintin. They aie
evidently econnoitering the ground
over which the Sianchan army sviu
march up and cross the river. Mean
while General Kuroki is trying to
seize and cross the Hun river far east
of Mukden. Thence he will move down
the river and co-operate with the
fourth army from Sianchan, while
Generals Oku and Nodzu engage Ki:
-I
LARGE FORGE
'^7^^^^?^^p^
JS?
ropatkfn's "attention' south of Mukden.
The attacks on Da pass and Saniungku
Sept. 20 were the first symptoms of
this vast flanking movement.
Kuropatkin now reports that Japan
ese scouts have been encountered near
the Hun river, half way to Mukden,
trying to seize Kaoutou pass, ten miles
northeast of Bentsiaputze, in order
to clear the way to Fushun, and that
Oku's and Nodzu's outposts have been
engaged in skirmishing with Cos
sacks near Inpu, between Bentsia
putze and the railroad.
JAPS ENGAGED IN AN EXTENSIVE
TURNING MOVEMENT EAST
OF MUKDEN.
St. Petersburg, Sept. 27.A dispatch
haji been received from General Kuro
patkin announcing that the Japanese
are preparing an extensive turning
movement east of Mukden. A large
force is advancing from Liaoyang by
way of Taiche to Sianchan. Skir
mishes have occurred in the valley of
the Hun river and at inpu, between
Bentsiaputze and the railroad. There
were many casualties at Inpu.
General Sakharoif telegraphs that
the Japanese advance guard during
the last few days attempted to occupy
Kaoutou pass, commanding the road
to Fushun, but were repulsed by a de
tachment of the Russian advance
guard.
On the south front all is quiet,
though shots are exchanged daily and
skirmishes occur between the advance
posts.
JAPS CONTROL WATER SUPPLY.
Capture Several Important Positions
at Port Arthur.
Chefoo, Sept. 27.As a result of
the battle before Port Arthur which
began on Sept. 19 the Japanese suc
ceeded in capturing several important
positions and the Russian tenure
the. big forts guarding the north and
east and northeast sides of the town
is seriously threatened.
Possibly the most important cap
ture during the three days' fighting
was that of Fort Kuropatkin, which,
while of minor value with regard to
preventing the entrance into the town
of the Japanese, had been constructed
for the purpose of protecting the
source of the garrison's water supply.
The control of this water supply i3
now in the hands of the Japanese.
Work for Six Hundred.
Exeter, N. H., Sept. 27.The cotton
mills of the Exeter Manufacturing
company, which have been shut down
since July 25, principally on account
of the depression in the trade, re
sumed operations in all departments
during the day. The company em
I ploys about CO O operatives.
CLOTHING HOUSE
A Full and Complete Line of
Kaufman's
Clothes
In aJl the latest styles and colorings
just received.
The Kaufman Clothes
Famous
'f *"^V*fxssstf
TTl W
WAGES ARE
REDUCE
Two Thousand Old Employes of
the Pullman Company
Again at Work.
Men Given Employment Said to
Have Been Selected With
Greatest Care.
Chicago, Sept. 27.Work was re
sumed during the day after a brief
period of idleness in the car shops of
the Pullman company. The company
put 2,000 of its former employes at
work at wages lower by 10 to 20 per
cent than they were receiving previ
ously. They are employed in the re
pair department.
These men have been picked with
care in the ten days the plant has
been closed. In their number will be
found none who has been known as a
labor agitator.
Six weeks ago the company began to
lay off men. This was continued un
til Sept. 15, when all except a handful
employed in one repair department
were told to go.
The cut in wages is general, extend
ing to employes in the office force.
The wage scale at the shops has
ranged in the past from $1.75 to $7 a
day.
DISCUSS INDUSTRIAL PEACE.
Delegates to Interparliamentary Con
gress Dined at New York.
New York, Sept. 27.A large num
ber of delegates to the Interparlia
mentary congress, who have just com
pleted a tour of the United States ana
who are now in this city as guests ox
the United States government, were
given a luncheon during the day by
the national executive committee of
the Civic federation at the Hotel Astor.
"Industrial Peace" was the topic of
discussion.
The speakers brought out the fact
that it is hoped by the executive com
mittee that the advantages of the fed
eration will be made so plain to the
delegates and that they will be so im
pressed with the benefits resulting
from such an organization that they
will arrange for and promulgate a
plan that will eventually result in the
formation of a civic federation in
every European country.
An international civic federation
was spoken of as not a mere possibil
ity but a rapidly growing reality. The
scope and benefits of the body both to
laborers and employers were spoken
of and its speedy accomplishment
urged.
ar
~-=====^r==z= tain the finest and best
choice^ cloths in America, and are the most elegantly made
ready-to-wear apparel on the market. Injact, they a,re models
of perfection and the best values ever shown.
We have added to our already
complete line of Shoes the
WALK-OVER
in all the latest lasts. For wear,
style and satisfaction the Walk
Over Shoes cannot be equaled at
$3.50 and $4.00
co n
tai l?r
ed
ful Iy
bea n*i
Line
W
a
The^ oemidj- i JJaily Pioneer
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1904.
EARLY IN COMiNG YEAR.
Probable Hate of Meeting of Second
Peace Conference.
"Washington, Sept. 27.-f-President
Roosevelt's announcement to the dele
gates to the Interparliamentary union
that at an early date he wbuld invite
the nations of the world to send dele
gates to a second peace conference
whose work should be supplemental
to that of the conference at The Hague
is regarded as a historic advance to
ward the adjustment of international
difficulties through the medium of arbi
tration. Quite naturally the question
arose as to how soon the president
might, call the conference. He did not
indicate in his address the probable
time of his issuance of the call, but it
can be stated that he will not await
the conclusion of peace between Japan
and Russia, both signatories to The
Hague convention, before issuing his
call. It is his present intention in
about six weeks to bring the matter
to the attention of the nations ^-of the
world with a view to ascertaining
their desires as to the time and place
of holding the second conference.
These preliminary inquiries will be
made through the department of state.
As soon thereafter as the replies re
ceived shall warrant the president will
issue his formal call for the confer
ence, which probably will,be early in
the coming year.
PURE FOOD CONGRESS.
International Convention in Session at
St. Louis.
St. Louis, Sept. 27.The interna
tional pure food congress assembler!
during the day at the world's fair for a
convention that will continue in ses
sion during the week. The purpose of
the congress, as stated by the National
Association of State Dairy and Food
Departments, under whose auspices it
is held, is to call into conference the
food scientists, food control govern
ment authorities and food manufactur
ing interests in order that some action
may be passed relative to the control
of food adulterations and misbrand
ing. With a view to establishing a
standing international food commis
sion on adulteration recommendations
to that end will probably be made by
the foreign delegates. The prohibition
of colors and antiseptics, the adultera
tion and false labeling of wines and
whiskies and the baking powder con
troversy are among the questions that
will come up for discussion. A reso
lution will be presented at the con
gress demanding that all foods com
peting for awards at the exposition be
free frona adulterations .and truthfully
branded.
AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION.
Six Hundred Delegates Attend Open
ing Sessioji
St. Louis, Sept. 27 ~TEeviargest
and
most representative gathering in the
history of the American Bar associa
tion marked the opening session of
the twenty-seventh annual session,
which convened in Festival hall on the
world's fair grounds.
Among the 600 members of the asso
ciation who were in attendance, to
gether with the many foreign dele
gates to the universal congress of law
yers and jurists, are Associate Justice
Brewer of the United States supreme
court, Hon. John W. Foster, former
secretary of state, and Sir William
Kennedy, chief justice of the high
couM of England. The crowded bal
cony of visitors evinced the wide
spread interest taken in the meeting.
The convention was "called to order
by James Hagerman of St. Louis, pres
ident of the association, who delivered
an address in which he commented on
the most noteworthy changes in stat
ute law on points of general interest
inade in the several "states and by
congress during the preceding year.
FAIRBANKS IN MONTANA.
Touring State Under Guidance of Ex
Senator Carter.
Glendive.SMont, Sept. 27.After a
7 o'clock breakfast Vice Presidential
Candidate Fairbanks and his party
began their proposed four days* cam
paign of Montana with speeches at this
place. Ex-Senator Carter, who is again
an aspirant for senatorial honors,
joined the party at Bismarck and he
will continue to be its guide until the
borders of the state of Washington
are seached.
Under his direction the Fairbanks
special train was sidetracked for the
night on the prairie east of Glendive
so that it would be necessary to make
a brief run before beginning the speak
ing exercises, which took place at 8
o'clock. Notwithstanding the early
hour there was a good attendance for
a sparsely populated country and the
warmth of the greeting was in nowise
diminished by the frost in the air.
Hon. William Lindsay, Republican
candidate for governor of this state,
presided and speeches were made by
Senators Fairbanks, Dolliver and Car
ter.
FOUR MEN DROWNED.
Their Boat Upset During a Squall Off
Albert Head, B. C.
Victoria, B. C, Sept. 27.The cap
tain of the British ship Blytheswood,
now in Royal Roads awaiting charter,
took a party of seven friends with
him during the afternoon for a sailing
cruise in one of the ship's boats. She
upset off Albert Head in a squall and
four of the party were drowned, in- i
eluding the sergeant major of marines
of H. M. S. Grafton and the jecond
mate of the Blytheswood. A ^tearn
launch sighted the overturned boat
with the survivors clinging to it and
rescued them.
Cows Derail Passenger Train.
Bay City, Mich., Sept. 27.Cows on
the track caused the derailment at
Linwood of a through Michigan Cen
tral passenger train from Mackinac.
The locomotive and five coaches left
the track. Engineer Thomas Rae of
West Bay City was fatally injured and
Fireman Horace Shaw of the same
place and Mail Clerk E. Miller of De
troit were also hurt. None of the pas
sengers were injured.
Kentucky Shooting Affray.
Middlesboro, Ky., Sept. 27.Jeffer-
son Etter killed Max Wolf in a fit of
jealous rage and also shot and slight
ly wounded his own wife. In his dying
agonies Wolf managed to shoot Etter
through the bowels.
^@@@i
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A4
^rnM^L
-8H-9-9l'S'99-9999 ft-ft $ $ $ $ 6
These are sellers. If you want
the best you can get, you
want the 'Palmer* Garment.
OXEARY & BOWSER,
Bemidji, Minnesota..
I1BIBII1HIIB O BIIIIHIIIIIII
Our Store must be vacated by October 1st
[GREAT
Slaughter
S SALE!:
*Men's and Boys' Clothing, Hats,
Caps, Shoes, Furnishing Good 5
S Cost not considered on any article!
Only a few days more. This will be your last oppor-
tunity to buy yor winter supply of up-to-date
goods at less than manufacturers9
Suits a^nd Overcoats
Of H. S. & M. and other prominent makes. Ralston Shoes, -M
Tiger Hats and Wilson Bros. & Oluett-Peabody Furnishings
MEYE aco.
jTo Cure a Cold in One Day *o^
Tak Laxative Bromo QuinineTablets (V/j&
Seven MflBon boxes soM in past 12 months. ThlS Signature,^* Sff^fCrr
MINNESOTA
HISTORIC*
-Making
GARMENTS
15he "Palmer" Garment
Is Money-Maker
Because there's a style about this line not found anywhere else in
town style which attracts the buyer.
Because there's a quality of fabrics, trimmings and linings which sat-
isfies the most particular requirements.
Because the tailoring is done in away that gives satisfying wear.
Because one sale this season makes two or three next season.
suits, skirts, raincoats,jackets
This is what we mean when
we say 'Palmer* Garment.
Styles are absolutely correct.
T*
SOCIETY
TJIJ Pioneer Prints
RE NEWS
than any ottigy news
paper between Duluth
and Crookston, St- Paul
and the North Pole.
TEN CENTS PER WEEK
&0
cost.
1-
'^1
"-5
3
-M -1
$ 3 1
$
on every
box. 25c.

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