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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, November 03, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1904-11-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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1 1 llllll 1 III IIIIUMIlN
A Pioneer
WANT Ad
Will Do It.
1
The wet day rubber, the
coUl day rubber, in all
the various styles can be
found at this store.
^v^v'^i
Dates to Remember:
Novembers, 7,8,9,10,11,12!
Now Come the Real Bargains act
Straw's Sho Store
Ladies' $," patent colt and iiue vici kid, turns and welts, at .$4,
Ladies' $4 patent colt and vici kid, turns and welts, at., ti.
Ladies' $.'5.f)0 vici and velour calf, turns and welts, at., ii.
Any $:i Shoes at. 2,
Any $2.oO Shoes at.. 2,
Any $2 25 Shoes at. 1.OO
Gent's $." patent leather, any style at.. 4,
Gent's $4 vici kid, velour and box calf at..
Gent's -f.'i.^O vici kid, velour and box calf blucher and
straight lace at.. 3.
Here is one of our staple lines in black Russian calf leath
cr lined, double sole, Goodyear welt: sizes broken $ 50: at.. 2.i
Gent's $.} vici, box and velour calf: single or double sole at.. 2.40
Gent's $2.25 vici and kangaroo calf at.. 1.OO
Gent's $2 kangaroo calf at.. 1.
REMEMBER. This is a. clean, fresh, new Stock
Piano Tickets!
Svvedback Hlock Phone 8!) 403 Beltrami Avenue
DR. F. E. BRINKMAN,
CHIROPRACTIONFR.
fcAA..AAAAAAAArfrr\AAAAAAA^rAAAA
OFFICE HOURS: 10 a. m. to Noorv, and 1 to 5:30 p. m.
O (iice-SW E BitACK 8N U.
Are Chiropractic Adjustments the same a.s Osteopath. Treatments? iti
No. The Chiropractic and the Osteopath both aim to put in place
that which is out of place, to right that which is wrong but the Path- A
j, ology Diagnosis, Prognosis and Movements are entirely different. JJ
One of my patients. Mr. W. A. Casler, has taken both Chiropractic
and Osteopoth treatments. The Chiropractic is ten times more direct
in the adjustments and the results getting health ten times more thor- T|
|p ough in one tenth of the time than an Osteopath would. 4
Subscribe for the Daily Pioneer.
Rxibbers,
FOR MAN, WOMAN
AND CHILD.
F\irs
We show the only
complete line of ladies'
and gentlemen's furs in
the city.
Ladies' Astrachan
Coats
From $25 to $45
O'Leary
iiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiwiiii'iliiiiwiiiMiiiirnffiffirm
00 25 00 OO
15
WP
emi
VOLUME 2. NUMBER 168. BEMIDJT, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1904
9\
9)
OO 25 OO
9\
GOOD for OLD and YOUNG
August Flower keeps the children healthy and
strong
Full of vigor and frolic the whole day long,
So when Mamma needs more they rush off in
high glee,
And shout to the druggist: Please give it to
me!"
Cfflnability to get up brisk and fresh in
the morning, lack of appetite, pallor,
muddy complexion and poor spirits
these all indicate a disordered stomach
and bad digestionin adults and children,
too. They also indicate the urgent need
of taking Green's August Flower regu
larly for a few days.
JfIt* a reliable old remedy for all stomach
troubles, never fails to cure indigestion,
dyspepsia and chronic constipation, and
is a natural tonic for body and mind, ti
CJTwo sizes, 25c and 75c. All druggists.
Sold by A G-ilmour & Co.
Captain Falls Overboard.
San Francisco, Nov. 3.Edward
Burch, captain of the quarantine serv
ice launch Pericles, fell overboard and
was drowned. The boat was bound
from Tiburon to the station on Angel
island at the time. He was thirty-eight
1 years of age and unmarried.
I
BRIEF BITS OF NEWS.
The Minneapolis police department
broke the record of arrests last month
by making over 800 arrests.
The condition of Kogoro Takahira,
the Japanese minister, who was oper
ated on for appendicitis last Sunday,
is considered very favorable by his
physicians.
Lumber receipts at Bay City, Mich.,
from Canada during October totalled
15,200,000 feet, the aggregate for the
season being 87,600,000 feet, somewhat
less than last year.
Paul Morton, secretary of the navy,
will make his first speech in the pres
idential campaign at Highland Town,
Md., a suburb of Baltimore, at a Re
publican rally on the evening of Nov. 5.
Helen Phipps, daughter of Henry
Phipps of Pittsburg, and Bradley Mar
tin, Jr., were married "Wednesday at
Kiltarlity parish church, Inverness,
Scotland, by the archdeacon of Lon
don, Dr. Sinclair.
Prices of all grades of coal have
been advanced 35 cents a ton at Pitts
burg as a result of the increased de
maud for coal and the strike of engi
I neers In Illinois, which has practically
closed all the mines in that state.
This Week
We Are Showing
A New Line of
Ladies' Shirts
AND
Shirt Waists
THELANPHEIT FUR COAT
Ladies' Scarfs
from
$1 to $25
DELAY IS A MYSTERY
DISPATCHES DO NOT REVEAL THE
REASON FOR FAILURE TO
RENEW FIGHTIN.G.
"1
SLOWLY APPROACHING INNER WORKS
JAPS CLOSING IN ON PORT AR-
THUR AND ITS FALL fS EX-
PECTED DAILY.
WAR DISPATCHES SUMMARISED.
The Russian and Japan*s"e armies
remain in entrenched positions, main
taining desultory artillery duels with
occasional small affairs alojig the ex
tended lines. Dispatches: from the
front give no explanation of the delay
in renewing the fighting.
A detailed official report of the oper
ations against Port Arthur, sent from
Tokio, indicates that the Japanese are
slowly approaching the iniier works
and St. Petersburg takes a gloomy
view of the situation there. Dispatches
indicate that the Russian war oinoe is
prepared for the announcement of the
fall of the fortress.
SIEGE DRAWiG TO A CL8S
PRESENT JAPANESE A&SAULTS
LIKELY TO RESULT IN FALL
OF PORT ARTHUR..
St. Petersburg, Nov. 3.The official
reports from Tokio describing the des
perate assaults on Port Arthur be
ginning Oct. 26 have created visible
depression at the war office. The sus
tained character of the bombardment
with siege guns and the breaching of
the wali: by underground mines, but
above all the fact that the Japanese
government after weeks of silence re
garding the operations of the besiegers
has given out these reports before
actual success has crowned their ef
forts, convinces the military authori
ties that after long preparations'. Gen
eral Nogi is not only making- a su
preme eifort to carry the fortf^'as' but
feels so confident of suecesajf'feaf' the
result of the preliniinafy 'Operations
has been made public.
The war office is trying to buoy up
the Russian hopes with reference to
the long and successful defense Gen
eral Stoessel has thus far conducted,
but things have now reached such a
pass with the garrison and the char
acter of the present attempt upon the
fortress is evidently so determined that
the authorities frankly admit they
would not be surprised if the end was
at hand.
DESPERATE FIGHTING.-
Tokio Reports Operations rn Front of
Port Arthur.
Tokio, Nov. 3.The official reports
of the Port Arthur operations since
Aug. 1 form a recital of almost contin
uous fighting of a desperate nature.
The Russians first struggled desper
ately to block every Japanese advance
and then met the concentrated artil
lery fire of the Japanese with its kind.
Latterly since the Japanese began run
ning parallels and traverses and ex
tending mines the Russians have been
constantly making sorties. They
rushed into the Japanese trenches and
engaged in ferocious struggles with the
engineers and pioneers. With desper
ate courage the Japanese continued to
close in upon the fortress, progressing
stage by stage. The Japanese infantry
never failed to respond when asked to
make an assault on almost impossible
positions and when the troops gained
a foothold they generally held it with
unflinching determination.
MINOR ENCOUNTERS.
Marshal Oyama Reports Several Small
Engagements.
Tokio, Nov. 3.Manchurian head
quarters, in a report dated Nov. 1,
says
"On the afternoon of Oct. 30, in front
of the left detachment of the left army,
a force of the enemy, consisting of a
regiment of infantry, three regiments
of cavalry and two batteries of artil
lery, advanced from Litewentun, Han
santai and then northward.
"Our detachment succeeded in re
pulsing the enemy.
"Our detachment sustained only a
slight loss, while the enemy's cavalry
lost heavily. Fifty of the Russians
lost their horses. The Russian cav
alry retreated in all directions and in
disorder, leaving thirteen dead.
"The left column of the left army
on the night of Oct. 30 seized and
burned a village about 400 yards north
west of Chenglienpac."
LEFT TWENTY DEAD.
Cossacks Repulsed in an Attack on Jap
Cavalry.
General Oku's Headquarters, Nov. 1,
via Fusan, Nov. 3.There is little
change in the positions of the Japanese
and Russian armies.
On Sunday last detachments com
posed of Russian infantry and Don
Cossacks attacked the Japanese cav
alry on the extreme left-along the Hun
(river, but were driven back, leaving
twenty dead soldiers and thirty horses.
This is the*flrst time that the Cos
Backs of the Don have taken part in
the operations.
The Japanese line now follows the
bank of the Shakhe river, except on
the extreme left, where it crosses that
river.
Russians Suffer From Sniping.
General Kuroki's Headquarters in
the Field, via Fusan, Nov. 3.When-
ever a Russian or a Japanese exposes
his head he draws the fire of an oppo
nent. A constant exchange of shots
between the outposts continues daily.
The Russian casualties from sniping
are large.
LONDON PRESS ANGRY.
Assails the Government for Not Allay
ing Fears of War.
London, Nov. 3.Tuesday's attack of
nervousness due to misinformed state
ments in the London newspapers has
given way to extreme calm. The news
papers angrily assail the government
for leaving London-to wrestle with its
fears all day loi when a word would
have disposed of all the alarms and
they suggested that if the admiralty
would request Vice Admiral Lord
Charles Beresford to refrain from "sur
prise mobilizations" and other inter
esting maneuvers during the next few
days it would not only add to the
tranquillity of the country but would
smooth the way to a final settlement
of the dispute.
The day's cabinet meeting excited
hardly the slightest interest on the
part of the general public. -For the
first time in many years the ministers
met at the premier's residence as Mr.
Balfour is suffering from the blocking
Of a small superficial vein in his left
leg, requiring complete rest. All the
ministers were present, Foreign Secre
tary Lansdowne coming in after hav
ing interviews with Ambassadors
Benkendorft and Cambon, who were
early visitors at Lansdowne house and
the foreign office, respectively. The
two ambassadors had previously met
to discuss some points of detail in the
formation of the international commis
sion.
The cabinet sat for nearly a couple
of hours, the subject of discussion be
ing details of the arrangement for the
international commission.
UNDERSTANDING IS COMPLETE.
Amicable Settlement of North Sea In
cident Assured.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 3.The Asso
ciated Press can authoritatively an
nounce that the basis for the British
Russian agreement to submit the
North sea incident to a commission
insures an amicable settlement with
out a sequel. The understanding is
complete.
In the heat of the excitement follow
ing the incident many false impres
sions obtained credence abroad. Now
that the smoke has cleared away it is
possible to state that Great Britain
disclaimed any intention of trying to
detain the Russian squadron, which
could only be interpreted as a hostile
act. It was never intimated to Russia
that Vice Admiral Rojestvensky's re
call would be demanded and Great
Britain n&ver asked Russia to pledge
herself to the punishment of any one.
The British government fully realized
that officers of the Russian' squadron
may have acted with excess of zeal.
The whole affair was a deplorable mis
take, but as "a result of the inquiry,
which will establish the facts, each
government is expected to take appro
priate-action without demands from
either side and no pledgee have been
requested or given by either country.
WILL GO TO PARIS.
Russian Officers Detached From the
Baltic Fleet.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 3.The Asso
ciated Press learns on high authority
that the four naval officers Vice Ad
miral Rojestvensky detached from his
squadron while at Vigo will not pro
ceed beyond Paris, whither Admiral
Kazankoff has already gone to meet
them. The names of the officers are
Captains Clado and Shramchenkon and
Lieutenants Ott and Ellis, who were
on duty on board the battleships com
prising the division which fired on the
trawlers. AGAINST RUSSIAN LEFT WING.
Japanese Show Signs of Assuming the
Offensive.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 3.General
Sakharoff telegraphs that all is quiet,
the Japanese, however, showing
marked signs of recommencing the of
fensive against the Russian left wing.
They have also reoccupied the village
of Sandiapu, near the Hun river, in
front of the Russian right flank.
SPAIN AND GERMANY PROTEST.
Their Claims Suffer by San Domingo
Arbitration Finding.
San Domingo, Republic of Santo Do
mingo, Nov. 3.The Spanish consul
here, In behalf of the Spanish govern
ment, also of the government of Ger
many, has presented a formal protest
to the Dominican government and the
American minister against the exe
cution of the arbitration finding in the
claim of the Santo Domingo Improve
ment company of New York, asserting
that the Spanish and German claims
suffer by the finding.
It is rumored that two German war
ships are expected to be summoned
here by the Spanish consul in con
formity with the Spanish-German un
derstanding regarding the affairs of
both nations in these waters.
OTTOMAN LEGATION AT ROME.
Turkey to Take Advantage of France's
Withdrawal.
Rome, Nov. 3.Turkey, taking ad
vantage of the severance of relations
between France and the Vatican, has
instituted negotiations for the estab
lishment of an Ottoman legation ac
credited to the holy see.
While Cardinal Rampolla was the
papal secretary of state an agreement
was reached for the establishment of
such a legation, 1[u France intervened
on the ground that the republic was
intrusted withrthe protection of the
Catholics in the East and the project
was abandoned.
NEW ERA IN RUSSIA.
Trial of Rioters Takes Plaoe With
Open Doors.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 3.The Russian
papers are devoting much space to the
trial at' Gomel of those alleged to be
responsible for the anti-Jewish riots
there in September of last year, a
thing almost unprecedented. The No
vosti, the Jewish organ, is especially
gratified,at the trial being conducted
with open doors, declaring that this
marks a new era on the part of the
governemnt towards the Jewish ques
tion,
i% ~F Ue Gas KiHs Two.
Milwaukee, Nov. 3.Mr. and Mrs.
William Bleck, aged seventy-five and
seventy-one respectively, died during
the day from inhaling gas which es
caped from a stove.
CONCESSION TO JEWS
RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT SOON TO
AGREE TO AN IMPORTANT
AMERICAN REQUEST.
AIDS TRAVEL IN CZAR'S DOMAINS
RECOGNITION OF PASSPORTS OF
AMERICAN JEWS THE POINT
TO BE CONCEDED.
Washington, Nov. 3.The state de
partment has received a cablegram
from the American embassy at St. Pe
tersburg which warrants it in the as
sumption that the Russian government
will soon agree to recognize passports
of American Jews traveling in Rus
sia. DENTIST BRUTALLY MURDERED.
New Ulm, Minn., the Scene of a Mys
terious Crime.
New Ulm, Minn., Nov. 3.Dr. L. A.
Gebhard, a young dentist, was found
brutally murdered, lying In pools of
blood in his office about 10 p. m.
A blood stained hammer and a knife
were found near him furniture was
smashed and blood was sprinkled all
over the room, indicating a terrible
struggle. The safe was open, but noth
ing seemed to have been taken.
Noise was heard in the room by oth
ers in the building, but it was attrib
uted to the moving of furniture. A
visitor to Dr. Gebhard's office found
him.
The murderer was evidently fright
ened away, for his escape had been
made by jumping through a screen
window.
The mystery surrounding the affair
is further increased by the high stand
ing, popularity and success of the mur
dered man.
COLONEL FLAGG SUICIDES.
Duluth Newspaper Man Jumps From
Deck of Steamer.
Duluth, Nov. 3.Colonel Alfred M.
Flagg, a well known newspaper man
of the Northwest, committed suicide
in a sensational manner. He was on
the ferry steamer, which was crovvdeci
With people cio^sing the Duluth ship
canal to Minnesota point, when he
suddenly drew a revolver, fired three
shots in the air and then leaped over
the rail.
There was a panic among the peo
pie on the boat as a resuit of tno
shooting and the leap of the colonel
into the water. The engines were re
versed and the colonel was rescued
with a pikepole, but too late to save
his life.
Colonel Flagg was fifty-two years
old, a native of Ohio and a widower.
Poor health was the reason for the
rash act.
HIGH PRICE FOR LEASE.
Fifteen Hundred Dollars Paid for Min
nesota Mineral Land.
St. Paul, Nov. 3.The largest price
ever paid for a state mineral lease in
Minnesota was received during the day
by State Auditor Iverson.
J. H. Gruber of St. Paul, with three
others as rivals, bid $1,500 for what is
known as the south half of 1-58-49, lo
cated in St. Louis county, and the
prize was knocked down at that figure.
Gruber is a land clerk in the employ
of the Great Northern road and the
supposition is he was acting for his
company. The lease, for which there
were a number of
applications,n
started at $:
was
G, a dollar more tha the
figure required by law and was lap
idly run up to the figure it was finally
sold for.
MURDER AT MANKATO.
Skeleton of Unknown Man Found In
Ciump of Bushes.
Mankato, Minn., Nov. 3.Mankato
has a murder mystery. The bones of
an unknown man was found four miles
north of the city near the Chicago and
Northwestern railway track, concealed
in a clump of trees and bushes. How
long they had been there can only be
conjectured, for the flesh was entirely
gone and the bones fell apart when
picked up. The skull had been
crushed.
HIS CONDITION SERIOUS.
Secretary of Railway Conductors Has
Stroke of Paralysis.
-'Cedar Rapids, la., Nov. 3.W. J.
Maxwell, grand secretary of the Order
of Railway Conductors, was stricken
with paralysis, during the day. His
condition is serious.
Fireman Jumps to His Death.
Ortonville, Minn., Nov. 3.To avoid
death by escaping steam that came
through a tole in the boiler which a
broken eccentric rod had pierced Louis
Ellison, aged twenty-three years, a fire
man on a Milwaukee stock train,
jumped from the engine and was killed
by his fall. A widow and one child
survive him.
Woman Shot by Hunters.
Iron Mountain, Mich., Nov. 3.Mrs.
Ellen Johnson was shot through the
shoulder at Homestead, Wis., nine
miles from here, by two hunters. The
lady had gone to the well for water,
being mistaken for a deer. This is
the first hunting accident of the sea
iion-here.
Minneapolis Man Shot.
Thief River Falls, Minn., Nov. 8.J.
Danlelson of Minneapolis is in the hos
pital here as the result of a bullet
wound received while resisting arrest.
His condition is precarious. Daniel
son is said to have been intoxicated
when the trouble arose.
Warned Never to Return.
Denver, Nov. 3.News from Gold
field, Nev., says that E. A. Colburn, Jr.,
has been deported from that camp by
miners and warned never to return.
Young Colburn is a son of Judge E. A.
Colburn, president of the Cripple Creek
Mine Owners' association.
The Pioneer Prints
MORE NEW S
than any other news
paper between Duluth
and Orookston. St- Paul
and the North Pole.
TEN CENTS PER WEEK
OVER FORTY INJURED.
Terrific Explosion of Dynamite at
Mount Verr on, N. Y.
Mount Vernon, N. Y., Nov. 3.A ter
rific explosion of dynamite which oc
curred here during the day caused in
juries to about forty persons and did
damage to property that is estimated
at $100,000. It is feared that one life
was lost. An Italian who was guard
ing the box containing the dynamite
has not been seen since the explosion
and it is believed that he must' have
teen blown to atoms.
The box, containing 100 pounds of
the explosive, was lying under a bridge
which crosses the tracks of the New
York, New Haven and Hartford rail
road at Bond street. The explosion
wrecked the bridge, broke windows in
every direction and in several in
stances stoves were knocked over and
the houses set on fire.
John A. and William H. Sullivan
were eating dinner when the dynamite
exploded. John was blown off his
chair through a swinging door leading
to the kitchen and was smashed up
against a gas stove in the kitchen.
The stove was overturned and the
man's clothing caught fire and he was
so badly burned that he may not re
cover.
The shock of the explosion was felt
for a distance of five miles and glass
was shattered within a distance of a
mile and a half.
The other persons injured were cut
by flying glass, but their hurts are said
to be not serious. Telephone and elec
tric light wires were prostrated. The
city was thrown into a state of intense
excitement.
Later reports show that several of
the injured are seriously hurt and it
is feared that at least three cannot
recover. Mrs. George A. Harlow suf
fered concussion of the brain, the
kitchen ceiling having fallen on her.^
She is reported to be dying. Mrs.
Nicholson is internally injured and
her recovery is considered doubtful,
the four-months-old son of Robert
Mears is not expected to live.
PERSONAL ALTERCATIONS.
Four Men Killed and One Fatally
Wounded in Alabama.
Birmingham, Aha., Nov. 3.Within
the past fifteen hours four men have
been killed and one fatally wounded
in personal altercations in the Bir
mingham district.
At l^ewisburg Jack Yarborough, a
merchant, and J. V. Phillips, a miner,
quarreled over a game of cards. Yar
borough was killed instantly and Phil
lips died several hours later.
At Cardiff W. M. Mulkin, a white
mine striker, applied an epithet to
Perry Burns, a negro miner, and a pis
tol duel followed. Mulkin was shot
through the brain, but lived for four
hours. Burns will die.
At Dolomite, during a negro wed
ding, a drunken^jjuest raised a dis
turbance and when the negro minister
remonstiated with him he shot the
preacher dead.
SALSBURY ON THE STAND.
Testifies in Bribery Trial at Grand
Rapids, Mich.
Grand Rapids, Mich., Nov. 3.At the
bribery trial of ex-Mayor Perry during
the day Lant K. Salsbury, ex-city attor
ney and principal witness for the pros
ecution in the water deal trials, testi
fied that Perry had said in his hear
ing a number of times, "When men
come here to buy city officials we are
justified in taking their money."
J. Clark Sproat, who followed Sals
bury upon the stand, also testified that
Perry thought that if Gorman and
Cameron, the original promoters of
the water scheme, came here to bribe
the city officials they ought to lose
their money.
Sproat, who was manager of the
Grand Rapids Democrat during the wa
ter deal, toid of his own acceptance of
money from Salsbury.
PREYED ON HIS MIND.
Contractor. Suicides on Account of a
Hallowe'en Shooting.
Ann Arbor, Mich., Nov. 3.A tragic
sequel to a Hallowe'en shooting oc
curred here during the day when Will
iam Copeland, a contractor, took poi
son and died. Hallowe'en night Mr.
Copeland discharged his shotgun at a
party of boys who had rattled his
fence. Alex Schlups received the
charge of shot in his back and court
proceedings were begun against Mr.
Copeland as a result of the shooting.
The matter preyed on his mind so
much that he committed suicide.
WITH A FRACTURED SKULL.
Iowa Woman Dying As a Result of
Mysterious Assault.
Des Moines, la., Nov. 3.A special
from Davenport says: Mrs. Ada
Manuel of this city was found in bed
during the morning with a fractured
skull. She now lies at the point of
death in the city hospital and in her
conscious moments refuses to tell who
struck the blow. A hatchet found in
a shed at the rear of the house is sup
posed* to be the instrument used. Sev
eral people are being held on suspicion.
BANKER SHOT BY OUTLAWS.
Highwaymen Kill Cashier and Escape
With Large Sum.
Cody, Wyo., Nov. 3.The First Na
tional bank of this town, on the out
skirts of civilization, was held up by---,
outlaws from the Hole-in-the-Wall
country, Cashier Frank Middaugh,
killed and a large sum secured. The
outlaws escaped on horseback toward
the mountains, hotly pursued by cow
boys and all the male citizens. The
robbers are still at large in the Rat-.
tlesnake mountains.
K'War Department Estimates.'
Washington, Nov. 3.The estimates f-sh-.
of the war department for the fiscal 7-^^-
year ending June 30, 1906, aggregates/
$103,686,780. This is $22,242,612 less,.-
than the war department estimates ^V\
submitted a year ago and $3,832,388 A
less than the total appropriations f-A.^
made for the use of the war depart
ment for the current fiscal year ending U*3,o-
June 30, 1905. .S-.'-
Death Cheats Prison Sentence!.
St. Louis, Nov. 3.John A. Sheridan,
a former member of the house of dele
gates who was indicted on a bribery
charge, convicted and sentenced to the
penitentiary for five years, is dead at
the Jefferson hospital from tubercu
losis.
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