OCR Interpretation


The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, November 25, 1904, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1904-11-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

A Pioneer
WANT AD
Will Do It.
VOLUME 2. NUMBER 186.
SAILORS IN A MUTINY
RUSSIANS ON BOARD THE BLACK
SEA FLEET SUPPRESSED BY
FORCE OF ARMS.
BEGIN A WIDE TURNING MOVEMENT
FORCES OF MARSHAL OYAMA AT-
TEMPTING TO ENVELOP
RUSSIAN LEFT.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 25.According
to a private telegram from Sebastopol
a portion of the crews of the Black
sea fleet mutinied Nov. 22 under the
Influence of the revolutionary propa
ganda. The mutiny, it is added, was
quelled by force of arms and several
of the mutineers were wounded. No
confirmation, of the report is obtain
able at the admiralty.
WIDE TURNING MOVEMENT
INDICATIONS ARE THAT JAPS ARE
UNDERTAKING ONE ON THE
RUSSIAN LEFT.
Mukden, Nov. 25.Indications are
growing that the Japanese are under
taking a wide turning movement on
the Russian left.
A large number of commissariat wa
gons have been observed going east
ward and some artillery exchanges
have also been reported from the east
ward.
General Kuropatkin has permitted
men who have captured horses to sell
them to officers, the proceeds to go to
the families of men killed in battle.
Fodder is becoming exceedingly
scarce.
The spirits of the men are good and
the food is satisfactory. The rations
of the men at the outposts and in the
advance trenches are sent to them at
night as it would be impossible to do
so during the day because the Japa
nese shell every convoy.
ARRIVES AT PORT SAID.
8ection of Russian Squadron to Pass
Through Suez Canal.
Port Said, Nov. 25.A portion of the
second Russian Pacific squadron has
arrived here. All precautions have
been taken to prevent any untoward in
cident during the passage of the ves
sels through the Suez canal.
The division consists of the battle
ships Sissoi Velikky and Navarin, the
cruisers Jemtchug, Almaz and Sviet
lana, several torpedo boat destroyers
and eight transports. The division ex
changed salutes with the town on. en
tering and the Russian band played
the British national anthem in honor
of the presence of the British guard
ship Furious. The local Russian rep
resentatives visited Rear Admiral
Voelkeisam's flagship. All the war
ships are fitted with wireless telegraph
apparatus. The ships are not ordered
to coal here, but will take water, fresh
provisions and hay for their live stock.
Cape Skagen, Denmark, Nov. 25.
The second division of the Russian
Second Pacific squadron sailed during
the morning.
TITLE TO PROPERTY CLEARED.
Iron Company Gets Land Worth Mill
ions of Dollars.
Marquette, Mich., Nov. 25.Clearing
title to the Maas mine property at
Negaunee, valued at several million
dollars, Circuit Judge Stone has filed
a decision in fc*vor of the Cleveland
Cliffs Iron company in its case against
Lewis Corbit and others. The litiga
tion, which came to trial last Septem
ber, involved the ownership of a wedge
shaped strip of land on which the
Cleveland Cliffs company had sunk a
Bhaft and made other costly improve
ments.
There were two sets of defendants
in the case, one consisting of Lewis
Corbit and the heirs of Stephen Gau-
Ehler'anU the other of "The "Heirs of
Antoine Barabe.
The Gauthier and Barabe farms were
sold to the Cleveland Cliffs Iron com
pany as a solid body of land, but the
Gauthier heirs had a resurvey and
claimed a strip of land on the old Ba
rabe farm.
The trial of the case, which was one
of the most important ever brought
in Northern Michigan, lasted for sev
eral days, during which many old res
idents of Negaunee were called as
witnesses.
JAPANESE PRINCE ROBBED.
His Apartments Visited While He Was
Seeing the Fair.
St. Louis, Nov. 25.Two handsome
diamonds rings and one pearl ring
belonging to Prince Sananaru Pushi
mi of Japan and a beautifully em
bossed emblem belonging to A. Sato,
grand master of ceremonies at the
Japanese court, the gift and decora
tion of a European monarch to Mr.
Sato, have been stolen from the
apartments of the royal visitors at the
Buckingham club while the prince and
his suite were visiting the world's
fair grounds.
The missing jewels were the favorite
ornaments of the mikado's cousin, and,
besides aggregating in value, it is said,
between $4,000 and $5,000, were heir
looms.
It was his special fondness to wear
them on all state functions, as their
history was interwoven with his pub
lic life. The stolen decorations be
longing to A. Sato are valued for its
associations and the high station of
the donor.
GREAT BATTLE IMMINENT.
Marshal Oyama Preparing to Attack
Kuropatkin.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 25.Appear-
ances again point to the possibility of
a big battle south of Mukden. The
Japanese, according to an official re
port, have received a severe setback
in the vicinity of Sintsintin, in which
direction they apparently were at
tempting to execute a wide turning
movement. Military opinion here
scarcely believes it possible that the
two great armie? Oan winter less than
a rifle shot distance from each other,
though the heavy defenses on each
side make it extremely difficult for
either to assume the offensive. It is
believed, however, that if the dead
lock is to be broken General Kuropat
kin will let Field Marshal Oyama take
the initiative, as the Russians have
the better of the present position,
namely, a strong line of defense, and
Mukden behind them, making satisfac
tory winter quarters, where the Rus
sian reinforcements are now accumu
lating for an advance next spring. The
Japanese also are being strongly rein
forced. The rivers are already frozen
sufficiently to permit of the movement
of artillery and commissariat trains,
so that the country actually is better
adapted to a Japanese, advance than
during the summer.
LOW TEMPERATURE IN ENGLAND.j
Wayfarers Found Frozen to Death in
the Snow.
London, Nov. 25.The temperature
in some districts of the United King
dom through the night, although 25 de
grees below freezing point, was the
lowest ever recorded here. The dis
tress is general and the local authori
ties are organizing relief work. The
interruption of road communication in
the country continues and the isolated
villages are suffering severely. In a
few instances wayfarers have been dis
covered frozen to death in the snow.
CALL FOR ANNUAL MEETING.
National Livestock Association to
Convene in Denver.
Denver, Nov. 25.The call for the
annual meeting of the National Live
stock association in Denver Jan, 10
to 14, 1905, is issued. The call states
that the principal business of the con
vention will be the consideration of
a resolution which will be proposed by
the executive committee for the ap
pointment of a committee to revise the
constitution and bylaws of the asso
ciation.
Ample Employment for Winter.
New York, Nov. 25.Ample employ
ment for the furnace and mills is now,
says the Iron Age, practically assured
for the winter, whch is usually faced
by the industry with doubt. The buy
ing movement has spread in all direc
tions and has assumed somewhat sur
prising proportions.
Ladies* Fur Coats at from $25 to $275
Ladies' Fur Collars and Boas, from $1 to
Ladies' Muffs, at from
O'LEARY & BOWSER,
SITE FINALLY CHOSEN
GREAT LAKES TRAINING STATION
WILL BE LOCATED IN VICIN-
ITY OF CHICAGO.
PRESIDENT APPROVES THE SELECTION
APPROPRIATION ALREADY MADE
AND WORK WILL BE PUSHED
TO COMPLETION.
Washington, Nov. 25.Secretary of
the Navy Morton announces that the
board appointed to select a training
station on the Great Lakes has unan
imously selectedg.rDl cmf shrd cmfw
Imously recommended that the lake
bluff site, thirty miles north of Chica
go, be selected. The president has ap
proved of the selection. The initial
appropriation for this work has already
been made, and it will be the policy
of the secretary to push this work to
completion as rapidly as possible.
FOUR MEN DROWNED.
Ferryboat Upset and Passengers All
Perish.
Port Huron, Mich., Nov. 25.The
rowboat of William Briggs, the night
ferryman between this city and Sar
nia, Ont., which is directly across the
St. Clair river from here, was upset
near the Sarnia dock early in the day
and four men from St. Thomas, Ont.,
who were passengers, were drowned.
Ferryman Briggs left the Port Hu
ron dock with six passengers in his
rowboat. A heavy sea was running
on the river, kicked up by the strong
north wind that was blowing. The
boat pitched and tossed on the waves,
but made the passage safely until
within 100 yards of Sarnia dock. Then
a heavy back swell from the shore
suddenly caught the craft and capsized
her. Ferryman Briggs, John Dopson
and Daniel Fisher saved themselves
by hanging to the overturned boat, but
the other four passengers were drown
ed.
NEW COMMERCIAL TREATY.
Russian Paper Favors One With the
I United States.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 25.The Bourse
Gazette revives the question of a new
commercial treaty with the United
States. The paper says it notes with
satisfaction that the negotiation of
commercial treaties forms a part of
President Roosevelt's programme for
i the coming administration and that
I its consummation is greatly to be de
I sired between Russia and America,
Commercial wars, the Gazette adds, are
in tho long run almost as costly and
disastrous as armed hostilities. The
I paper says Russia ought to be willing
to meet any American overtures half
i way and that, the result should be
equally beneficial to both countries.
TRAIN ROBBERS SENTENCED.
Get Long Terms In the Minnesota
Penitentiary.
Mankato, Minn., Nov. 25.Judge
Craydhast
disposed of prisoners con-
victe a the presentthe term of the dis
trict court and not already sentenced.
i The two men who held up a freight
train at Minneopa Falls last July and
robbed a traveling man named E. F.
Leuz, were convicted of robbery in the
'first degree. Charles Sanders goes to
I Stillwater for fourteen years and elev
en months and Thomas Murray for
twelve years and eleven months.
James Swallow, who bound, gagged
and robbed an old lady that was alone
in her house at Danville, got.twelve
years and six months.
1
PEACE MOVE FAIL8.
Board of Arbitration Tries to Settle
Chicago Strike.
Chicago, Nov. 25.A move for
peace by the' state board of arbitra
tion in the strike of the cattle butch
ers in the plant of the Hammond
Packing company failed during the
day. The members of the board of
fered their services to President Mc
Lean, but he declined them with the
statement that arbitration could be of
no avail at Jhis time. No move by
i
|[pi|jyi%iSjr^^
,r^v^
^m-r
The Bemidji Dailv Pioaeer
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1904.
the unions in the threatened general
strike at the stock yards Is expected
for a day of two at least. 'Power has
been given to President Donnelly of
the Butchers' union to call this strike,
lut he declined to disclose* his plans.
LIES AT THE POINT OF DEATH.
North Dakota Man Victim of Accident
or Murderous Attack.
Forks, N. D., NOT, 26.John
gGrand
lemer, a machinery dealer of Edmore,
at the point of death as the result
Of either an accident or a murderous
assault. It was at first reported that
the man was found dead on the road
after a collecting trip. He is still liv
ing, but unconscious, and there is no
means of knowing the cause of his
condition. WALLACE CAUGHT IN LONDON.
Missing Michigan Man Arrested in
England.
New York, Nov. 25.A private dis
patch from IiOndon reports the capture
Of James Wallace, who was secretary
to James Breitung of Marquette, Mich.,
and who was accused of stealing $30,-
000 worth of securities from Breitung
Most of the securities were recovered.
Priest's Injuries Prove Fatal.
Fonda, la., Nov. 25.Rev. Father
James F. Brennan died from injuries
Teceived from a kicking horse last Sat
urday. Father Brennan had both legs
broken and jumped from the moving
buggy with both limbs in that condi
tion. He was fifty-two years old.
Tried to Thaw Dynamite.
Burlington, la., Nov. 25.A young
man named Carl Peterson, of Burling
ton, while attempting to thaw out
some dynamite at the city stone quar
ry was blown to pieces by an explosion
of the stuff. Portions of his body were
thrown a great distance.
HUGE PILE OF COAL ON FIRE.
Japanese Shells Ignite Russian Fuel
at Port Arthur.
Chefoo, Nov. 25A huge pile of coal
near the railway station at Port Ar
thur was ignited by Japanese shells
on Nov. 20, and, according to Chinese
arriving here by junk during the day,
it was still burning when they left
the besieged town on Nov. 22. A Jap
anese torpedo boat destroyer over
hauled this junk, but allowed it to pro
ceed. Another junk with six Hindoos
on board was taken ashore, where the
junk was burned. The passengers were
sent to Dalny.
CAPTURED BY THE JAPS.
British Vessel Makes Vain Effort to
Enter Port Arthur,
Chefoo, Nov. 25.The report that
the steamer Tungchow, laden with 30,-
000 tins of meat, was captured by the
Japanese Wednesday while trying to
enter Port Arthur, appears to be cor
rect. Th^e Tungchow was- a British
vessel and belonged to Butterfield &
Swire of Shanghai. Last Monday,
when leaving Shanghai, she was trans
ferred at the last moment to a man be
lieved to be acting for the Russian
government.
CALCHA6 TO BE RELEASED.
Bond Filed to Cover Value of Captured
British Ship.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 25.A bond to
cover the value of the British steamer
Calchas, captured by the Vladivostok
squadron while bound from Puget
sound ports to Japan, pending a final
decision in her case, has been filed
and orders have been telegraphed to
Vladivostok to release her.
ARTILLERY SILENT TWO DAYS.
Unless Japs Attack Soon Russians
May Take Offensive.
Mukden, Nov. 25.The artillery
has been silent for two days. The
opinion prevails that if the Japanese
do not attack soon General Kuropatkin
Willi take the offensive.
WISCONSIN MAN SHOT DOWN.
James B. Knapp Killed While Hunting
Deer Near Rhinelander.
Osceola, Wis., Nov. 25.James B.
Knapp, the Soo bridge tender at this
place, was shot at night while hunt
ing deer near Rhinelander, dying a
few hours later.
The party who shot him, when he
found out what he had done, ran and
has not been found.
Friday en Saturday FUR SALE
Men's Fur Coats at a discount of 20 per cent
Men's $100 Fur Lined Coats for $75
.50 to $10 Sale will close Saturday night at 10 o'clock
Our guarantee goes with every garment. We trust that we
will see yo\i &A our sale but if for QLn reason yovi cannot
buy Furs we etsk yo\i not to give your order to Fur Fakers.
There aure plenty of reputable Bemidji stores that will sell
Furs for less than outsiders' will.
T^^T^"
81
Are You Ready?
We Are
with as fine a line of SteinBloch
Smart Clothes for cold weather
as ever was tailored. Browns,
cozy and rich Greys, comfort-
able and warm Solid tones in
all sorts of fabrics. The style
with which these clothes have
been made is a revelation to
men who ha^e been believing
for years that only a "custom
tailor" could make clothes wor-
thv of their attention. A Stein-
Bloch "try on" means a minute
profitably passed. Come in
and learn about this label:
A*AW\
Schneider Bros
1 The Clothiers.
Kaufman Designs
are Advance Styles
No Back Numbers in
nothing that is not up to the newest
notch in style.
Every Kauf nsa suit or overcoat is made
up for this year's wear, from ths very latest
plates and patterns .jr dressy men.
Superb style, firis fabrics, best work
manship and perfect fitting quality are
found in Katifznaa art^tailored Gar
ments.
They show the same attention to im
portant little things, the same finishing
touches cf individual hand work, that the
most exclusive merchant tailor bestows.
Sold at mighty persuasive prices.
The Kaufman guarantee of money
back if dissatisfied is good as gold.
Palace Clothing Store.
HISTORICAL
socif-: i Y.
BRITONS GROWING ANXIOUS.
Fear Canada May Be Estranged From
England.
New York, Nov. 25.Dispatches re
ceived in London, says a dispatch
from that city to the Times, have
aroused considerable anxiety in some
quarters in regard to the future rela
tions between Canada and the mother
country.
Many English statesmen appear to
believe, the correspondent continues,
that there is a strong probability of
closer commercial relations between
Canada and the United States, which
would result immediately in great
damage to England's, colonial trade
and eventually, perhaps, in the disso
lution of the political ties that unite
England and her American colony.
rrs^lw^irp^w^
TodayandTomorrowOnly
3 &
By our Traveling Representative, MR. I. KRAWETZ,
at the Markham Hotel store room (formerly
occupied by J. H. Rea, the tailor.)
A full line of Ladies' Fur Jackets, in Beaver, Persian
Lamb, Krinimer, Astrakan, Near Seal, and a large
assortment of Scarfs Boas and Muffs.
All our Furs are sold at Whole-
Sale Manufacturers' Cost Price.
Gentlemen's Fur-Lined Coats at greatly reduced prices.
Did you see our Fur Detachable Collars
Furs to Please! Prices to Suit!
A. Zekman, Fur Manufacturer.
Minneapolis, Minn.
Don't fail to see the $350 Alaskan Seal Jacket
that we are offering Friday and Saturday
for V- V- 1275
The Pioneer Prints
MORE NEWS
than any other news
paper between Duluth
and Crookston, St- Paul
and the North Pole.
TEN CENTS PER WEEK
Special Sale on
..FURS..
TO OFFICER CHINESE ARMY.
National Guardsmen of Oregon and
Other States Being Recruited.
Portland, Ore., Nov. 25.The Ore
gonian prints the following:
Officers for the Chinese reform army
are being recruited from the national
guard of this state, and it is said that
already about twenty-five members,
some of them locally prominent, have
made applications. Trained officers to
the number of 8.000 are being sought
by the Reform association.
All who make application are bound
to secrecy. But it is learned that ser
vice is promised for five years, that
transportation will be furnished, and
that the pay is to be 20 per cent great
er than that of American officers in
the tropics. The applicants have been
told that the army they are to com
mand will .number ,3 50.000.
ft
i.
"j
3
*fcrv-**g&

xml | txt