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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 26, 1905, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1905-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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New York, Oct. :26The seven-story
tenement house on the corner ot Grand
and Mott streets 'was shaken Dy an
explosion of dynamite which some un
known person had placed on the steps
of the butcher shop on the ground
floor. The explosion threw the hun
dreds ot tenants in the building and in
the houses adjoining into a panic.
The butcher shop was wrecked by
the explosion, but the rest of the house
was uninjured save for the smashing
of many windows.
Dr. Vincenzo Seltro, who has an
office and apartments in the building,
informed the police that the dynamite
probably was meant for him. He said
that he had received several threaten
ing letters, the first demanding $5,000
and the others ranging down to $100.
He ignored all the letters. Finally one
came telling him he must not think he
was forgotten and that he would yet
feel "the mighty vengeance of the
'Black Hand.'
fcUr-IM POSED STARVATION.
Prisoner in Butte Jail Ends Life by
Refusing to Eat.
Butte. Mont.. Oct. 26.James F.
Earns, awaiting trial for the murder of
Patrick Hanly in this city Sept. 3, died
in the county jail during the night ap
parently from self-imposed starvation.
Barns lor the past three days has re
fused to touch a morsel of food or
drink, bemoaning his fate and express
ing terror lest a mob should again at
tempt to lynch him. Some time ago he
made an unsuccessful attempt at sui
cide, but his stomach was so weak fol
lowing a prolonged fast that it refused
to hold the poison.
y
Workman Meets Horrible Death.
St. Paul, Oct. 2G.Oscar Mosthter,
a young m?Yi twenty-five- years age,
met a horrible death in the lard refin
ery of Swift & Co. at South St. Paul.
Mosthter was employed in the refinery
nd while at work, through some un
accountable way, became entangled in
the belting and was drawn into the ma
chinery.
Muskrats Held Responsible.
Madison, Wis., Oct. 26.The mys
tery that has surrounded the cutting
of ropes whereby many launches and
rowboats on Lakes Mona and Mendota
have been let loose is believed to have
been solved by the discovery of musk
rats doing it. A watch was kept for
vandals thought tj be guilty.
ft
ft ft ft
"BLAC HAND"
AGAIN IN ACTIO N
A Large Charge of Dynamite Destroys a
Seven Story Tenement House In
New York City.
COA BARGAINS
VT ffvVT
$5 Coats $2.50, $10.00
Coats $5.00, $15 Coats
$7.50, $20 Coats $10,
1 $25 Coats $12.50.
0'Leary & Bowser.
We are showing the finest line of Fall,
and Winter Coats in town.
HIS FATHER IS
HIS ACCUSER
Asks Governor to Remove
Son From Office as
County Sheriff.
A father asking for the sum
mary removal of his son from- a
public office and citing drunk n
ness, malfeasance and moral de
generecy in support of his re
quest is the unique features of a
petition just filed with Governor
Johnson at St. Paul.
Erick Erickson yesterday filed
with the executive a petition ask
ing that his son, Charles M.
Erickson, sheriff of Roseau
county, be removed from office.
Erickson, in asking for the re
moval of his son as sheriff, for
whom he is acting as bondsman,
says in his petition to the gov
ernor that his' son has been
drunk almost continuously since
elected.
Excavating for Building
The work of excavating for the
building to be ejected for the
new Norwegian newspaper to be
established in this city has been
commenced. The contract for
the work of completing the
structure has been let to Thos,
Johnson. The building will be
25 by 60 feet in size. The officers
of the,new company expect that
they will be ready for business
in a month.
Kodol Dyspepsia Cure
Digests what you eat*
they are last season's
garments and we want
to*close them out.
NUMBER 159. BEMIDJ1, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1905.
ft ft
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Thursday Morning we
will put on sale 25
ladies' coats at 1-2 price
These coats are worth
from $5.00 to $25.00
and for service are well ft
worth the money but
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AT MERGY OF STRIKERS
RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT UNABLE
TO TRANSPORT TROOPSJTO
SUPPRESS DISORDER.\.
SITUATION BECOMES MORE CRITICAL
f
FACTORIES FORCED TO CLOSE
AND STREETS ARE FILLED
WITH IDLE WORKMEN.
fit. Petersburg, Oct. 26.Over half
of European Russia is in the grip of
the striking railroad men and the
strike continues to spread rapidly in
all directions. The roads in the Volga
region are at a standstill and a general
strike has been proclaimed on the two
remaining lines running out of St. Pe
tersburg. In a day or two the capital
is expected to be cut off from the out
side world by way of the continent.
This will also involve the suspension
of postal communication.
The League of Leagues has seized
the opportunity to come to the support
of the railway men and has adopted a
resolution in favor of a general strike
of all professions. The telegraph oper
ators are joining in the movement and
the suspension of railroad traffic, it is
.feared, will be followed by a complete
obliteration of communication between
interior points The situation is -crit
ical and pregnant of all sorts of dire
possibilities. The factories in the af
fected districts have been forced to
shut down for lack of fuel and Moscow
especially faces not only a food but a
water famine. Fortunately St. Peters-,
burg will have communication open
through Finland.
The workmen of the Putiloff, Kol-
3'oiuo, Ale:,androvski.and Nevski works
struck during the morning.
The Social Democrats believe they
have the government at their .mercy
since with the railroads stopped the
authorities are powerless to transport
troops. This is all the more serious
as bloody collisions already have been
reported at various places and a dan
gerous agrarian movement has again
broken out in the government of
mara. '"f{'[:'"':tSa-
\y^
Government Taken by Surprise.
The strength displayed by the Social
Democrats has amazed the authorities,
who were taken quite as much by sur
prise at the evidence of their power
as they were at the time of the/Gapon
rebellion."
The distress in the central provinces
Is greatly increased by the enforced
suspension of the famine relief work.
A deputation of students and strik
ers called on Count Witte and present
ed resolutions embodying their de
mands adopted at a mass meeting.
Count Witte warned the deputation
that a continuation of the strike could
only result in bloodshed, either by com
pelling the interference of the military
or by the famine stricken populaces
of the cities turning upon the strikers.
"Remember," he said, "the govern
ment may fall, but with it you will
perish."
In conclusion Count Witte advised
the men to return to work, but his ad
vice, however, was howled down and
the resolution to strike was adopted.
There are 400,000 railway employes
in the empire and their average wage
is $140 per annum.
Trains in the Baltic provinces are
not running and the situation is report
ed very bad at Riga and Libau.
Bloody conflicts have occurred at
Ekaterinoslav.
The postoffice refuses to accept reg
istered letters,.parcels or money for
transmission abroad.
Hospital-trains having on board 500
sick and wounded soldiers from Man
churia are held up near Moscow. The
condition of the men is pitiable.
GREAT DISTRESS AT MOSCOW,
Conditions There Resemble a State ef
Siege.
Moscow, Oct. 26.This- city resem
bles a state of siege. The price of
meat has trebled and there is great
distress among the poor. Many people
living in neighboring cities and who
came to Moscow are camping in the
streets and 2,000 persons are living in
cars. On the Kazan line the stations
are in ihe hands of troops.
The post and telegraph offices are
strongly guarded by Cossacks. The
populace is becoming panicky.
COMMUNICATION CUT OFF.
Employes of Vienna Railroad Join the
^d Strike.
Warsaw, Russian Poland, Oct. 26.
Communication with St. Petersburg is
interrupted. '&Mk
Agitators have induced" the em
ployes of the Vienna, railroad to join in
the strike.
Strong patrols of infantry and cav
alry occupy the streets and troops are
guarding the railroad and government
S
SPEAKS AT LITTLEROCK
IMMENSE CROWDS ASSEMBLE TO
WELCOME THE PRESIDENT-
JO ARKANSAS.
LOUDLY CHEERED ALONG LINE OPMARCH
CHIEF EXECUTIVE PLEASED WITH
THE CORDIALITY OF HIS
RECEPTION.
Little Rock, Ark., Oct. 26.After an
all night journey from Birmingham
President Roosevelt and party arrived
in Argenta, a northern suburb Qf this
city, promptly on time. Despite the
threatening attitude of the elements a
large,crowd was present from all parts
of the state to welcome the president.
When the president's train arrived
at Argenta a reception committee head
ed by United States Senators Berry
and Clark, Governor Davis and. Federal
Judge Treiber entered the president's
car and warmly welcomed him to Ar
kansas. The president did not alight
from .his car at Argenta and the train
proceeded to BigJRock, the nearest
point to Fort Logan H. Roots. Here
the president and his party alighted
and a visit was made to the post, the
party arriving there at D:30 o'clock.
After a brief reception the president
inspected the barracks and grounds
and expressed his satisfaction at the
excellent arrangements for the comfort
of the troops. Nearly the entire morn
ing was taken up at Fort Roots after
which the start fojr the city was mide.
Warm Greeting at Little Rock.
The president headed by his escort
of honor and accompanied by the re
ception committee, reached tlie citv
hall before noon. The streets were
jammed with people and every avail
able spot on the main streets had* its
occupants. The president was loudly
cheered as he passed along towards
the city park. He repeatedly rose in
his carriage and bowed his thanks to
the people. At one /point on the street
the way was cleared with difficulty, so
great was he crush. The president,
seemed pleased ,with the cordiality of
his reception
The party ti'aversed Tenth street to
the city park, where an immense
throng of people had gathered about
the speakers' stand. The meeting was
presided over by Hon. George W. Rog
ers of the-Little Rock board of trade.
The president was welcomed to the
state and* city by, Governor Davis and
Judge T. Reiber in appropriate ad
dresses.
When the president stepped forward
to respond he was again greeted
warmly.
ELKINS SUMMONS COMMITTEE.
Senators Will Discuss Railroad Rate
Legislation.
Washington, Oct. 26.Senator El:
kins, chairman of the senate commit
tee on interstate commerce, has called
a meeting of that committee for Nov.
21 for the purpose of considering the
testimony taken early in the summer
relative to the regulation of railroad
rates with the ultimate view of
reporting a bill to the senate. Ever
since the hearings on the subject
closed the committee has had two ex
perts and a number of clerks em
ployed compiling informatien for the
use" of the committee and the senate.
They eave collected a large mass of
data and will have it in shape available
for the committee's benefit. The com
mittee will take up the entire subject
as if no bill had been considered here
tofore, but it is expected the chairman
will be prepared to present a measure
of his own as a basis for discussion.
Senator Foraker also has a bill which
will receive consideration. It' is ex
pected that when once convened the
committee will continue its work until
the opening of congress on Dec. 4 and
it is by no means probable that it will
conclude by that time.
HANCOCK HELD AS ACCESSORY.
Prominent Man Mentioned in Verdict
on Girl's Death.
Washington, Oct. 26.The coroner's
jury to investigate the death of Miss
Emma Smalfwood, which .occurred
about ten days ago near
Hyattsvbille:
Md., has returned the verdict that the
woman died of malpractice performed
by a person or persons unknown to
them and holding Winfield Scott Han
cock, a nephew of General-W. S. Han
cock, and his sister, Mrs. Amanda
Mackall, the former having been ar
rested in connection with the case, to
be accessories to the act.VJ^ $.-
Chicago, Oct. 26.The interstate
commerce law convention met in
Steinway hall this morning, but only
delegates signing the pledge to sup
port the President's ideas on rafo6 leg
islation were admitted. Twohundred of
the so-called railroad delegates, head
ed by D. M. Parry, president of the
manufacturer's association, refused to
sign the pledge and met in a rump
convention at Studebaker hall.
New York, Oct. 26.Emory McClin
tock, actuary of the Mutual Life Insur
ance company, resumed the stand at
the morning session of the insurance
investigating committee. Mr. McClin
tock testified at length regarding de
tails of the' technical phases of life
InA'irance..
A
it
:4
Firemen and Spectators Injured.
New York, Oct. 26.Explosions of
turpentine injured ten firemen and half
as many spectators at a fire that de
stroyed the paint manufactiMng estab
lishment of Feigel & Co. on West
forty-ninth street.^^ ^a
bill will be less.
REFUSED O SIGN 1
ROOSfiVELT PLEDGE
Railroad Delegates to Interstate Com-
merce Convention Bolt From
the Meeting.
Shoes! Shoes! Shoes!
The Largest Stock! The Best Makes!
can be found at E. H. Winter
& Co.'s Store. The price we
guarantee to be as low as the'
lowest.
Th
i -K,
i. W
/viY/% N stands for the best
quality and the best
fitting shoe known.
DREW SELBY
Selby" Shoe once will always wear one.
AMERICAN
men's shoe that will give satisfaction,
carried in all leathers, styles, and widths.
SFfTTPTTV SCHOO SHO E
OUVLJlVl 1 Buy Security
shoes for the
ChildreA
'4
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Ph6ne^30
Bemidji. w. Iinn
Jfc
TEN CENTS PER WEEK \f\
VICTORY FOR THE ROADS.
First Clash Between City of Chicago
and Street Railways.'
Chicago, Oct. 2.Th first clash
between the street railway companies
and the city in the .quo warranto pro
ceedings brought against the Chicago
City Railway company and the Union
Traction company and their sub
sidiary companies resulted in a victory
for the street railways when Judge
Dupuy of the superior court upheld the
right of the railway companies to con
test the validity of the filing of the
quo warranto-proceedings. Arguments
which will affect the entire proceed
ings began at once.
t-
"Hanan"
nam
S
a Urew
GENTLEMAN
a $3.50 gentle
and your shoe
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