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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 02, 1912, Image 1

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BULL MOOSE ENDS
9,000 MILE TOUR
Spoke at Raleigh, North. Carolina
Lost Night and is Now on Way
to Oyster Bay.
MADE OVER 300 SPEECHES
Number Does Not Include Those
Made From Rear End of Train
at Country Cross Roads.
VISITED THIRTY-SEVEN STATES
Took Exactly One Month to Swing
Across Country After Start
In Connecticut.
(By United Press.)
On board Roosevelt private car,
homeward bound, Oct. 2.With his
voice so frazzled that it cracked at
times, Colonel Roosevelt made the
last of his speeches on his swing
around the circle at Ashville, N. C.
today.
He did not spare himself work,
however, because he looked to a
day's rest tomorrow at such seden
tary pleasures as wood-chopping and
horseback riding when he reaches
Oyster Bay.
Roosevelt expressed himself today
as greatly pleased with the receptions
accorded him throughout his south
ern tour. He believes he has blazed
the path for the Progressive^ move
ment in the south.
Up to the last the Bull Moose lead
er continued his attacks on the Dem
ocratic party and Governor Wilson.
Raleigh, N. C, Oct. 2.Theodore
Roosevelt, erstwhile president and
willing to try the job again, entered
this city yesterday on the home
stretch of the most comprehensive
campaigning tour ever undertaken by
a presidential candidate.
By the time he reaches New York
tomorrow, the Bull Moose leader will
have covered something over 9,000
miles, and have made 300 speeches to
perhaps 10,000,000 citizens, in ad
vocacy of the progressive principles
for which he is fighting. The 300
speeches do not count mere rear
end-of-the train talks, of which there
were scores. It does not give an idea
of the typically Roosevelt strenuosity
of the trip, of an enthusisiasm that
never waned, keen insight into local
conditions, an alertness and versatil
ity that transformed what were about
eight basic topics for speechmaking
into almost new addresses in city af
ter city.
Thirty-seven states have been
traversed by the Bull Moose leader.
One month ag0 today he began his
swing around the circle by an ex
cursion into Connecticut. Thence he
swung westward, zigzagging up and
down to the coast, and then east
ward and through the south, return
ing along the Atlantic coast.
The Colonel had a physician along
with him, but he might just as well
has dispensed with his services, and
merely gargled his throat when it
got tired from speaking, for he was
in the same splendid trim today as
when he left Oyster Baystill sun
burned and vigorous in every move
ment.
"Wihat I'm anxious to do now,"
said the Colonel today, "is to get
back to Oyster Bay, play a few sets
of tennis, take a ride or a walk, and
then I'm ready again."
Throughout the trip the Colonel
has worn just one suit of clothes.
Indeed, his wardrobeand his sim
plicity was reflected in the fact that
he carried only one big kit bag and
two suitcasesonly contained the
one business suit and a frock coat.
That one gray suit was sadly worn
and wrinkled and creased and dirty,
as its wearer ought to have been af
ter such a trip, but the Colonel isn't
much on style. His black felt som
brero was almost equally marked
with wear and travel.
Here was the usual Rooseveltian
program day by day:
Arise at 7 o'clock.
Shake hands with a crowd and
make a two minute talk, perhaps in
the middle of his breakfast at 8
o'clock.
Talk politics with local Bull
Moosers,, interspersed with perhaps
a couple of set speeches.
Grab luncheon at 1 o'clock.
More speeches, and in between
times, rest. (Rest, according to the
Colonel's notion, consists of reading
such books as the history of the Sec
ond Empire, the French Revolution.
*&* *3%r
THE
BENTON tll'MIUJN.
Former Tennessee Governor, Who
Is Again Democratic Nominee.
or some of the French essayistsin
their own language.
Dinner, say about 7.
More speeches, probably up to 11
o'clock, and then to bed.
Of course, on such a varied trip as
the Colonel has taken the above pro
gram wasn't always carired out. Gen
erally is was about twice as stren
uous. It should also be mentioned
that the Colonel sandwiched in daily
a personal letter to Mrs. Rosevelt,
handled his regular mail, read the
newspapers and mapped out addi
tional work.
The Bull Moose regularly sprung
about half a dozen stock jokes or
"brighteners", but they were sprung
with just as much spontaneity yes
terday in the south as they were in
Connecticut nearly a month ago. And
they always fetched the crowd. One
favorite was for the Colonel to shoe-'
the little ones away from the rear
of the train, and then remark confi
dentially to the crowd, in that
squeaky falsetto the ex-president al
ways adopts when he is humorous:
"You know, 1 don't want to lose any
little Bull Mooses."
The "Abyssinian treatment story"
was another of the Colonel's favor
ites. It hinged on John D. Arch
bold's complaint before the Clapp in
vestigating committee that "Darkest
(Continued on last page).
FOOTBALL WITH AKELEY.
The Bemidji high school foot ball
team will play Akeley Saturday af
ternoon instead of Thief River Falls
as previously announced. The Thief
River date has been tentatively post
poned for a week but definite ar
rangements have not yet been made
by Coach Carson. The team will
leave for Akeley at 6:30 a. m. over
the Great Northern and will return
at 8 p. m. Owing to the fact that
Akeley is but forty miles from Be
midji a large number of students ex
pect to acompany the team.
STUDENTS TO PUT ON PLAY.
Students of the high school have
selected Friday night, Nov. 1, as
the date for the play which will be
produced to raise money with which
to pay off the Chippewa debt from
last year. The 1912 class went about
$100 behind on the Chippewa and
the school will try to reduce this
debt by putting on the play. Several
different sketches are being consid
ered but one has not yet been se
lected.
PINCHOT CANNOT COME.
Knute Roe has received word that
Gifford Pinchot, chief forester under
the Roosevlt administration, cannot
come to Bemidji to speak in the in
terests of Roosevelt's candidacy for
the presidency. Pinchot's manager
says that they have but three days
in the state and will not be able to
come here, Mr. Roe says that there
is a chance that Senator Beveridge
may come in Pinchot's stead.
SCOOP
THE CUB
REPORTER
^foueRfc "TO Be
SPORXlN EDITOR*
i SCOOP- WILL BE.
NECESiARM "TO INSTRUCT
IXOU N 'THE. VARIOUS
1SPORT DEPARTMENTS!
HAVE WERE, SOME./
,FEETBAUL.TO TS ~S
iL^iiV! t'tcAJHiStii
FRANK
DAYIS
NAMED
By United Press.)
St. Paul, Oct. 2.Frank A. Day
was elected chairman of the execu
tive committee of the state central
committee and Democratic state cam
paign manager by the committee be
fore it adjourned last night.
After beating Dan W. Lawler of
St. Paul, Democratic candidate for
senator, on every contention he
fought for, his foes put F. A. Pike,
a loyal supporter, on the executive
committee. Lawler had claimed he
was refused a man on the committee..
After answering Lawler's first.at
tack by a decisive vote of forty to
eleven, the committee also defeated
a resolution calling on all members
of the committee to support every
man on the ticket. C. J. Buell said
that men who would not support the
ticket through their' sense of honor
would not do so because of any reso
lution. The vote against the resolu
tion was almost unanimous though
strongly championed by Lawler ad
herents.
Just before the meeting adjourn
ed and while Austin was declaring
that there was no room on the com
mittee for bolters, some man not a
member of the committee shouted,
"Who bolted James Gray two years
ago. Instantly Lawler turned
around and pointed his finger at D.
Murphy, from Stillwater, and said
"You are a coward."
"Take that back, I never said a
word but no man can call me a cow-
ard," replied Murphy and started
after Lawler. Lawler perceived his.
mistake and apologized and the two
men shook hands.
ARREST Ml tr DEALERS
"Sr
Minneapolis, Oct. 2.Warrants
for the arrest of eight of the most
important milk dealers in the twin
cities, on charges of conspiring to
raise the price of milka felony un
der the Minnesota anti-trust law of
1899were issued yesterday on com
plaints sworn to by Thomas P. Ma
guire, general superintendent of the
state's detective service, 802-803
Lumber Exchange, co-operating with
County Attorney James Robertson.
Six dairy concerns operated by the
men against whom complaints were
made were also named in the war
rants.
The issuance of the warrants fol
lowed a raise of one cent a quart in
the price of milk, said to have been
made today by all of the members of
a reported milk dealers' association,
following a meeting of eight of the
ten alleged members in the commit
tee room of the Produce exchange.
Sixth street and Second avenue north
Sunday. A dictagraph was used to
gather the evidence concerning the
alleged conspiracy to raise milk pric
es, acording to Maguire, who said
that while the milk dealers discussed
the matter for nearly an hour he and
a court stenographer crouched in a
retiring room opening directly off
the committee room and took a ver
batim report of the proceedings, in
cluding numerous references to the
price raise and votes on the new
prices.
The transmitting end of the dicta
graph, Maguire said, was concealed
behind a mop bucket which stood
against one of the walls of the com
mittee room. The transcribed dicta
graph report was turned over to
County Attorney Robertson. The in
dividuals and concerns for whom
warrants were issued today were
C. A. Nelson, president Clover
Leaf Dairy company, and reported
president of-the new dealers, organ
ization.
(Continued on last pagre).
HOW -WE. IDEA OF THE QflME
\*~WUSi( ^fOO ADVAHCE
wrrn TH E. PULSI ON A ND *T3
OP TO E TO STOPXOU O
6NTIX THATT OU CEASE^
CTO ADVANCE AND WEN
TVfcS CALC A DOCTOR.
AHDVOU
SELECT
^OOROWN
MOSPITAU
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 134. BEM1DJI, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 2, 19l2.ti ^l .**&ffi^!^81 iMS#l TT3f .CENTS PER WEEK.
(Copyright)
BRUCE-BROWN IS KILLED
Died in Hospital Yesterday Afternoon
Following Wreck of M& Car On
the Vanderbilt Cup Course.
GOING NINETY MILES AN HOUB.
(By United Pisess.)
Milwaukee, Oct. 2.^David Bruce
Brown died at Trinity hospital at
3:10 Tuesday'afteriioir^'^^"^"
Running at a speed of nearly nine
ty miles an hour, the Fiat car bear
ing David Bruce-Brown and his me
chanician, Scudelari, overturned in a
ditch after rounding the "hair pin"
turn, the northwestern corner of the
Vanderbilt cup automobile race
track.
Physicians announced that both
Brown and his mechanician were suf
fering from fractured skulls and that
operations would be necessary.
Bruce-Brown had been running
almost neck and neck with Teddy
Tetzlaff, also in a Fiat, and after
rounding the "hair pin" turn, Tetz
laff forged to the lead. Tetzlaff
loked back after going a short dis
tance and was surprised to notice
that Bruce-Brown's car had disap
peared.
Surmising that something was
wrong he turned back and came upon
Bruce-Brown's crippled car in a
ditch beside the track. Brown, his
clothes torn and covered with dust,
was walking about with a limp,while
Scudelari was lying in a ditch near
the car.
An automobile with two physicians
was rushed to scene from the main
tent hospital at the grand stand, and
the condition of the two men was
found to be such that they were im
mediately rushed to Trinity hospital.
Bruce-Brown was born in New
York in 1887 and began racing in
1907, driving an Oldsmobile at the
Empire City track, winning his nov
ice race. In 1908 he ran away from
school and acted as mechanician for
the late Emanuel Cedrino at Or
mond Beach, Fla. Here Bruce-Brown
broke the one mile amateur straight
way record held by William K. Van
derbilt, Jr., the youngster's time be
ing 33 3-5 seconds. The same year
he won the Shingle Hill olimb at
New Haven, Conn., and in 1909 low
ered his amateur mile mark to 33
fiat at Ormond Beach, while he also
won the Sir Thomas Dewar cup and
broke the ten-mile world's record.
(Contimaed on last page.)
Football, Football, That's The Game For Me,
Slap 'em In The AnkleKick 'em In The Knee
Nv/WEK A SPGCmiVR PANS POUR.
S\T5 TO SEE A GAME, AND ONE
OF TVtS. PLAXERS \S KILLED,
is so tMTERESTtN(*:'mr
THE. ROOTER. ^tGrVRES 'tfE^
^CrErrnHfr- Vte HAUFBACK!
s&~
-^^^.^ii
A-*.J^ji
irwssa
*$%
m.mmmm:'mmsmi3mmf-.
WATCHING THE SCORE-BOARD
OVER LEASED WIRES
(By United Press.)
Wellesley, Mass., Oct. 2All young
men calling on Wellesley girls on
Sunday nights must go to chapel
with them, before they begin the
grate fire or moonlight duets.
Brussels, Oct. 2. Baroness Von
Coehern, shut in a lunatic asylum
by relatives who, she says, were to
lose control of her fortune when she
wedded, has eloped, and marired
Henry Bezoner, her wooer before her
imprisonment^ f^rr-^h"~ '"'i-:^r-:'
New Orleans, Oet. 2.Vincent Se
gura, famous Mexican bull fighter
and the hero of stories written by
O. Henry, was arrested here on sus
picion of starting a filibustering ex
pedition. He proved his identity and
was released.
Omaha, Neb., Oct. 2.Seven
speeches in six hours is the taste of
strenuous life local managers plan
for Woodrow Wilson when he comes
to Omaha Saturday.
Between 9 a. m. and 3 p. m. Gov
ernor Wilson will speak at a carni
val celebration, a "woman's league
convention, a Creighton college stu
dent assembly, a Commercial club
luncheon, a monster Auditorium
gathering and two laboring men's
meetings.
Beverly, Mass., Oct. 2.Every
hamlet and cross-roads in the coun
try may hear President Taft expound
his politics and argue the issues of
his campaign. They may hear him
but not see him.
Paramatta cottage rang with the
sound of his voice yesterday after
noon. Persons in distant parts of the
cottage were jarred by the vibration.
In a few days, as it gains in strength
and volume, his voice may be heard
the country over.
To an audience of oneonly his
military aide, Major Rhoads, being
in the room with himPresident
Taft delivered a stentorian speech
outlining the important campaign
issues and arguing emphatically for
his policies.
He was talking into a phonograph
recorder from which records will
be made and sent broadcast from
coast to coast.
TEACHERS TO LECTURE
At a meeting of the faculty of the
high school Monday afternoon, it was
decided that each member of the fac
ulty would give a short talk at the
weekly assemblies which are held
each Wednesday morning. The teach
ers will give their talks in order of
seniority of service.
'mwmm .-ssi
HALLOWELLS ARE COMING
Concert Company which Drew Pack
ed Houses Here Last Spring
Due Again October 21.
VAUDEVILLE STAES WOEBING
Tihe Hallowell Concert company
will play a return engagement in Be
midji Monday night, October 21.
This announcement was made this
morning by Mrs. C. R. Sanborn. The
people who are to appear in vaude
and the concert will be given for the
Episcopal church fund. The com
pany played two nights at the Grand
theatre this spring and drew capacity
houses at all performances.
Under the direction of Miss Doro
thy Humes, of Cass Lake, the young
people who a? to apepar in vaude
ville for the church three nights,
October 14, 15, and 16 are fast pro
gressing toward finished productions.
The Brinkman theatre will be used
and a different show will be put on
for two performances each evening.
Those who have seen the rehearsals
say that the "Henry" chorus, with
Hubby Lord as the principal, is one
of the best children's chorouses that
has ever been produced in Bemidji.
Another headliner will be "Blow me
a Kiss" by a chorus with Dorothy
Torrance as principal: "Boogie
Man Moon." the song which made
such a hit at Cass Lake a month ago,
will be put on here also.
Mrs. C. R. Sanborn and Miss Doro
thy Humes will appear one evening
in a "Colonial Act" and Miss Humes
and Miss Donna Lycan will go on
one evening in a ten minute enter
tainment which they call "Team
Work." Several of the young men
of Bemidji will appear disguised as
Italians in a song, "Pick, Pick, Pick."
(The press agent did not state wheth
er it was pick-axe or pick on the man
dolin.)
Miss Humes is spending most of
her time in Bemidji and the choruses
are drilling every day.
Will Give Second Lecture.
Miss Beatrice Eddy will give the
second of her series of lectures and
demonstrations on Thursday after
noon, October 10. Miss Eddy has
not yet deeided what food she will
discuss. The demonstration will be
given in the coking room at the
high school and all ladies interested
are urged to attend.
"HO
XDRATHER7\
SV^QOTA GAMEV
O P1NOCUE-
v^= ITS At-J-
THE. ScWEU
rro Nbo-Boss1
-""SI Hi-"* -t
ITALIANS PARDON
FAMOUS COUNTESS
Marie Tarnovski Released From Pri
son After Serving Two Years of
Eight Year Sentence.
PLOTTED TO BUI. HUSBAND
Used Lover As Tool In Order to Be
Free to Marry a Third As She
Had Planned.
TRIAL TOOK SIX MONTHS
Prosecution Showed She Remained in
Vienna While Murder Was
Caried Out By
Accntffjp
Borne, Oct. 2. After having serv
ed less than half of her eight yean
prison sentence, the Countess Marie
Tarnovski, often spoken of as the
most beautiful and captivating queen
of the great criminal adventuresses
of ihistory, has been pardoned by the
Italian government. The announce
ment of the pardon has aroused much
interest and not a little public criti
cism of the action of the authorities
in setting at liberty a woman who,
in the language of Prof. Rossi of G
noa, the distinguished alienist and
psychologist, is suffering from "a dia
bolical malady which makes her un
answerable for her acts, and wbo
should be so confined as to prevent
iher from injuring others or herself."
For two years the woman has been
confined in prison in Venice on a
charge of murder. With her two lov
ers, a Moscow lawyer and a young
Russian official, she was convicted in
1910 on a charge of successfully con
spiring to murder her hxrabapd. t3oont
Paul Kamarovski, 1907. The charges
were based on the accumulated evi
dence produced through an exhaus
tive investigation by the Austrian
and Russian police, by the confes
sions of the lovers, Naumoff and Pri
lukoff, and even by the confession of
the countess herself, which, however,
she later denied and retracted.
The Countess Tarnovski, despite
her long career of intrigue and ad
venture, is now but little more than
thirty years of age and is said to be
as beautiful as ever. She is the
daughter of a noble Russian family
and was educated in a convent.
WCuile still in her teens she eloped
with Count Tarnovski, a wealthy
man, who after their mariage treated
her with great brutality. She grew
to hate him and deceive him. One
of 'her lovers, Borgevsky, was shot
by her husband and died in her arms.
Another, a Russian officer named
Stahl, committed suicide, and it is
alleged that he did so at her insiga
tion. Her brother-in-law, the young
er Tarnovski also committed suicide.
In 1903 the Countess met Prilu
koff, a Moscow lawyer, who desert
ed his wife an dfamily, embezzled
his clients' money, and traveled
through Europe with her. On their
voyages they met Naumoff, a neuro
tic young man of twenty-one, who al
so came under her spell. Later she
encountered Count Karmarovski, to
whom she became betrothed.
In the summer of 1907 the Coun
tess, according to her own account,
became tired of her wanderings with
her lovers, and began to think of
marrying Count Karmarovski and
settling down. Prilukoff, she assert
ed at her trial, suggested that mur
der was far preferable to matrimony.
Then it was that the plot to insure
the Count's life and then kill him be
gan to be hatched. The first step
was to induce him to insure his- life
in her favor for $100,000.
The next step was the inflaming
of Naumoff against Kamarovski, and
this was affected in a simple and in
genious manner. A telegram was
drafted, addressed to the Countess,
and signed with Kamarovski's name.
It contained the foulest insults
against both the Countess and Nau
moff. This telegram was sent from
Vienna to Venice, and telegraphed
back to Vienna. There Prilukoff
and the Countess caused it to toe
shown to Naumoff, and the latter,
in a frenzy of rage, hurried to Ven
ice to take vengeance on tihe suppos
ed slanderer.
Naumoff made his way to the
Count's villa early In the morning
of Sept. 4, 1907. Brushing past the
maid, who opened the door, he strode
into the Count's bedroom. The lat
ter, awakened by his entry, cried out
in alarm. Naumoff, without a word*
fired at him five times with a revoi
ver, inflicting mortal wounds. Nmn-
iCamttnrutHm last
?&MM^
e-3
-3

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