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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 10, 1912, Image 1

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THE
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 141.
DUN N AMENDMEN
UP O TH E VOTERS
Minnesota Development Association
Urge Its Approval at General
Election By Wide Margin.
NEEDS MORE THAN PLURALITY
State Law Says Changes In Constitu
tion Must Be Ratified By Ma
jority of All Voting Then.
MEANS SMALL TAX INCREASE
Proposes to Raise Available Road
and Bridge Fund From $300,-
000 to $1,200,000 a Year.
C. M. King, president of the Nor
thern Minnesota Development assoc
iation, F. W. Muiphy, president of
the West Central Minnesota Devel
opment association, and R. Bon
nallie, president ot the Southern Min
nesota Development association have
banded together to use the combined
influence of these associations to see
that the Dunn amendment is passed
by the voters this fall.
The constitution ot the state ot
Minnesota, provides that the legisla
ture may levy an annual tax upon
the property ot this state not to ex
ceed one-quarter of a mill to be used
in the construction and improve
ment of public highways (the term
'highways" includes bridges.) At
the last regular session ot the legis
lature an amendment was proposed
changing this section so that the leg
islature might piovide for an annual
tax levy ot one mill instead of one
quarter of a mill to be used in the
construction and improvements of
public highways.
The change is a simple one. It
increases the tax levy tor the purpose
mentioned only tin ee-quarters of a
mill. The present law provides tor
a road tax of one-quarter of a mill
and this produces a little more than
$300,000 a year A one mill tax levy
would raise approximately $1,200,000
annually to be expended by the state
upon the highways and bridges, and
in a manner that would not be felt
by any taxpayer. The pending
amendment increasing the levy from
one-quarter of a mill to one mill be
comes vitally important for "the reas
on that the only manner in which aid
may be obtained tiom the state for
the construction ot highways and
bridges, is through the State High
way Commission
The rule governing the adoption of
amendments to the constitution of
the State of Minnesota, makes it nec
essary for the amendment to receive
a majority of all the votes cast at the
election at which the amendment is
submitted. It is not sufficient that
more voters vote tor the amendment
than vote against it
To illustratesuppose there are
300,000 votes cast at the general
election in November, 1912, and
suppose that only 200,000 vote upon
a given constitutional amendment,
101,000 woulr'Jbe a majority of the
200,000 voting upon the amendment.
In fact, it would be lost. For the
amendment to carry and be adopted,
it would be necessary that it receive
affirmative votes amuonting to a ma
jority of 300,000 votes, the total
number cast at the election. For in
stance, 151,000.
Many persons not feeling that they
understand the amendment fail to
vote at all upon it Such failure to
vote at all counts as a negative vote
just as effectively as if the voter had
voted no on the amendment Tms
rule places the burden upon the ad
vocates of all constitutional amend
ments. A burden much greater than
is planned upon the advocates of a
certain person for election to of
fice
For a candidate to be elected gov
ernor or any other office with the
state, it is only necessary that he re
ceive more votes than any other can
didate for the same office. It is not
necessary that he receive a majority
of all votes cast at election. Thus, it
will be noted that it is made much
more difficult to adopt a constitution
al amendment than to elect any offi
cer within the state. Friends and
I advocates of the one-mill tax amend
1 ment should fully understand and
bear this rule in mind in their efforts
to secure the adoption of this amend
ment at the coming general election
The object of this tax is so meri
-terous and the amount thereof to be
borne by the average voter, is so
very insignificant that people are es
pecially interested in securing th#
Historial SocietyH HHS^ ^^SSB* *R
JOSEPHUS DANIELS.
Member of Democratic National
and Wilson Campaign Committees.
01912, by Afnencan Press Association
adoption of this amendment. Public
spirited citizens associations having
for their object the development of
the state commercial clubs and
similar organizations in the state
have been solicited to take up a cam
paign favor of this amendment,
to the end that the voters thorough
ly understand the purpose of the
amendment before the November
election
ECLIPSE O TH E SUN
Washington, D. C, Oct. 10.
There is to be a total eclipse of the
sun today, but few persons in the
United States and none in Canada
will have an opportunity to view the
phonomena. Residents of southern
Florida, if conditions are favorable,
will be treated to a partial perform
ance by old Sol when he hides him
self behid the moon.
The path of totality will cross
South America from a point near
Quito, Ecuador, to Rio Janeiro, Bra
zil The best place, it is figured, for
observing the eclipse will be in the
vicinity of the Brazilian metropolis.
Here the astronomers from America
and Europe have set up instruments
with long, unpronouncable names to
take observations during the two
minutes duration of the total phase
START ON SUPERSTRUCTURE.
Work on the New Great Northern
depot has reached a point where the
contractors are about ready to start
on the second floor. The window
casings tor the first floor have been
set in and much of the brick work
has been finished.
AGRICULTURE IN MINNESOTA.
The government has just complet
ed the printing of a pamphlet telling
of agriculture in Minnesota The
information is compiled from that
sent in two years ago by census tak
ers and gives farm and farm products
statistics for the entire state both
in sum totals and county by county.
The booklet will be sent free upon
application to the department of
commerce and labor at Washington.
Suicidal Habit of Butterfly.
Considerable interest attaches to a
migration of butterflies to this coun
try from the continent which recently
took place, remarks the London Stand
ard. The migration in question con
sisted chiefly of the pretty "Clouded
Yellow" and the well-known "Painted
Lady." The extraordinary part of the
story is this, that none of either spe
cies will ever get through the British
winter. All true British butterflies
sleep from October to March, either
as eggs, caterpillars, pupae or butter
flies, but the Painted Lady and Cloud
ed Yellow perish. It has long been
suggested that they migrate back
again to France, but the necessity of
waiting for a north wind and the fact
chat such a wind in October is in
variably too cold casts some doubt
upon this theory. The Red Admiral
(s another victim to suicidal migra
ien.
SCOOP
CU
E
TH
I
REPORTER
&***(r To ttAKE. *TVNE P^VCE OP-
A TICKET TO HE WORLD se.\es
I HAVE TO STKK. SOMEBODY
OP^ AND TAKE \T AWAY FfJOM ^M'.
CRO REPOR OU
Record Harvest Predicted.
The department of agriculture's
official estimates of production of
the country's principal crops,
which this year promise to be the
greatest in history, were announced
yesterday and are given below with
figures showing the previous record
crops and ten year produced.
The following preliminary esti
mates are made:
Bushels Bushels
Crops. 1912. Record Crop
Spring Wheat. 330,391,000 292,657,000
Winter wheat 389,942,000 492,888,000
All wheat 720.433,000 784,460,000
Oats 1,417,172,000 1,186,341,000
Barley 224,619,00a 178,916,000
Rye 35,422,000 34,879,000
(a)Hay 72,425,000 70,798,000
The following estimates are based
upon condition figures.
Corn 3,016,000,000 2,927,416^000
Buckwheat 18,000,000 22,792,000
Potatoes 401,000,000 389,196,000
(b)Tobacco 974,000,000 1,055,765,000
Flax 19,000,000 29.285..000
Rice 24,000,000 24,510,000
(a)Tons, (b)Pounds
Washington, Oct. 10.With the
garneririg of the harvests of the
country, predicted earlier in the
season to be greater in most cases
than ever grown by this or any other
nation, the department of agricul
ture continued its preliminary esti
mates ot the production of these
crops in tb* October report of the
crop reporting board of its bureau of
statistics. The report, compiled from
reports of correspondents and agents
of the bureau, and isued at 2:15
o'clock Wednesday afternoon, an
nounced preliminary estimates of
the production of spring wheat, all
wheat, oats and barley, and esti
mated, from condition reports, the
prospective total yield of corn, buck
wheat, potatoes, tobacco and rice.
CHARLEY TAFT LIBERAL
(By United Press.)
Washington, Oct. 10.Charles P.
Taft, President Taft's brother told
the Clapp investigating committee
yesterday afternon that he gave
$159,339 in 1909 to help his brother.
Four years ago, he testified he- gave-
$324,339 to the national committee
and the Ohio state campaign, but
Chairman Hitchcock later returned
$15,000. In 1904, Taft said he gave
$5,000 to the Roosevelt campaign
fund. In 1908, $44,986 was con
tributed by him exclusively to as
sist in the Ohio campaign. In the
primary fight last spring he gave
$125,000 to Representative McKin
ley for the national campaign, $64,-
000 to Arthur Varys for use in Ohio
and paid $8,300 to send the Blaine!
Marching club to Cincinnati last
June.
DYNAMITE TESTIMONY
(By United Press.)
Indianapolis, Oct. 10.Actual
taking of testimony in the dynamite
conspiracy began yesterday after
thirty hours of statements by attor
neys for the prosecution and de
fense.
Warren G. Duke, of Evansville,
Ind a Western Union employee was
the first of more than 700 witnesses
who will be examined. Duke testi
fied about a telegram sent by Hockin
in Chicago to McManigal in Evans
ville. Duke was to be followed by
other telegraph and telephone em
ployes to tell of messages.
NYE PLEADS GUILTY.
(By United Press.)
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 10.State
Representative George E. Nye, of
Pike county, Ohio, facing trial next
week for soliciting a bribe in con
nection with the White-Quayle bill
in the legislature, came'into criminal
court yesterday afternon and plead
ed guilty. Sentence was deferred
PARTRIDGE KILLS SELF IN DOOR
A partridge got caught in one of
the doors at the high school about a
week ago and when picked up was
found dead.
F^^M^AF^FOR^^ Jp
POCKET- AMD THAT DONTW/ORKH
XLU POINT MY PIPE AT Hll^
A frUHAMP SCARE. HIM. INTO
COWNfr acaoss!
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, THUFSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 10, 1912r
(Copyright)
GREEKS LEAVE CHICAGO
Three Hundred Ready to Go From
Twin Cities and Many Others
Expected in From Country.
RETURNING HOME TO FIGHT
LATEST FROM THE FRONT
Londan, Oct. 10.By special wire
at 1:32 p. nvAJ&udons hattje is
reported in progress between the
Turks and Montenegrans around
Detithitch mountain on the Turkish
frontier. Heavy losses reported.
Chicago, Oct. 10.Greek women of
Chicago justified ancient Spartan
traditions last night and smiled
through tears, though their hearts
were fearful, as they "bade goodbye
to 300 young men who left for the
Bulgarian frontier.
All day long bugles had sounded
calling the men together at Blue Is
land avenue and Polk street. War
buleltins had been read telling of the
first battle, uniforms had been
donned and at six o'clock last night
the Young Greeks' Educational as
sociation, which has been conduct
ing drills for weeks, received its or
ders from the front.
The scenes .during the day at the
armory of the Young Greeks' assoc
iation resembled the days of prepar
ation before the Spanish war. Bul
bulletins had been read telling of the
printed as dodgers and distributed.
Cheers were given when the news of
Montenegro's was declaration against
Turkey was received in a special
dispatch from Lesemahos Kaftogog
lou, minister from Greese at Wash
ington.
Minneapolis Men Ready.
Minneapolis, Oct. 10.The call re
ceived here from the Greek consul is
for the return of all reserves of the
Greek army enlisted from 1900 to
1009 and for all men wh.o left Greece
in 1910 and 1911 who had not en
tered the army.
Will Fight to a Finish.
Gust Brown, owner of the Be
midji Candy Kitchen'.says that Greece
has five warships and several hund
red thousand more men than when
she warred on Turkey last. The
country also has a good war fund.
Mr. Brown says that if the powers
do not interfere, the Balkan states
will fight Turkey to a finish.
fUPwv"m^ouS\
HANDS- MY MAM-
B&FORETMAKE
MOUR HEART
LOOK UK6 A
Sw\ss CHEESE*.
A REGULAR CIRCUS PERFORMER
BAGLE FAIR OPE N
Bagley, Oct. 10.Special to the
Pioneer.The first day of the sixth
annual fair of the Clearwater County
Agricultural association opened to
day with a fine display of vegetables
and stock. The attendance was light
owing to the bad weather and the
condition of the roads. Tomorrow
will be everybody's day, and a large
attendance is expected from outside
villages and cities.
NYMORE PAVING PROGRESSING.
-Pavement has been laid on -the
Nymore road to a point a few yards
this side of the spur running into
the Crookston Lumber company load-,
ing sheds. Lack of labor and poor
working weather has handicapped
the contractors so that the work has
been moving slowly. The old wood
en sidewalk has been taken up in
order that teams would have rom to
pass the paving gang. The old walk
will not be relaid as the wood had
rotted and it is probable that people
passing that way will have to use
the street until next spring.
REAL ESTATE FIRM MOVES.
Reynolds and Winter have moved
their offices from the rooms on Bel
trami avenue formerly occupied to
the building opposite the Markham
hotel which was until recently oc
cupied by the Boston Lunch. The
firm is painting the outside of the
building and making interior repairs
JOURNAL MAPS ARE OUT.
-The Pioneer has received the 1910
"census maps of the Northwest from
the Minneapolis Journal. The maps
are bound together and not only give
correct geographical locations but al
so give population and vital statis
tics taken from United States census
reports.
FROM SOUTH DAKOTA.
South Dakota is the latest state
to send a colony of settlers to Nor
thern Minnesota, five families from
Eddy having purchased land on the
B. Walker Mallard tract in Hub
bard county. They are: James
Flaws, 120 acres L. R. St. Johns,
80 acres Edward Hupp, 120 acres
Walter Tisch, 120 acres, and John
Flaws, 520 acres, the latter tract
being purchased for the purpose of
starting a sheep ranch and cattle
and dairy farm. John Bolt of Lake
Itasca with 80 acres has also joined
the Mallard colony. All of these
purchasers are to settle at once with
their families.
You're A Real Rough Guy, Ain't You, Scoop By "HOP"
HOME COOKED SUPPER
High School Girls to Feed Bemidji
In City Hall Saturday Even
ing for Quarter a Plate.
THIEF RIVER TO PLAY HERE
High school girls will serve a home
cooked supper in the city hall Satur
day evening at 5 o'clock in order to
raise -money to assist In financlti&
the football team. Arrangements
were completed last night whereby
Thief River Falls will send a team
to Bemidji and the game will be
played on the home field at 2 o'clock
Saturday.
The high school supper is in charge
of the young lady members of the
High School Athletic association.
Each class has one girl on the board
6f control and these four, consisting
of Edith Ryan, Ruth Miner, Ruth
Getchell and Lucille Moritz, togeth
er with the secretary, Flora Todd,
will- solicit the food and name the
girls who will assist In the service.
The high school has had two games
this season and with the money
raised from one party has succeeded
in breaking even. It will cost over
$40 to bring the Thief River Falls
team to Bemidji and this amount
must be raised from the gate receipts
and the proceeds of the supper.
Thief River Falls has a team
which has been practicing hard since
its defeat by Fosston and is out for
blood. Reports say that the Bemidji
boys will have a hard game. Be
rn Jji team has been crippled this
weok by absences and last night
were unable to practice at all. The
field was wet this afternoon but the
coach will give the men a good work
out tomorrow.
BITTEN BY A DOG.
The son of Mr. and Mrs. S J. Har
vey was bitten by a large dog yester
day. The boy's wound was dressed
at once and he is said to be progress
ing nicely today.
BALLASTING RED LAKE ROAD.
The Red Lake road has had a gang
of men at work for some time ballast
ing the road bed and leveling off the
grade. Gravel has been hauled^ for
nearly the entire length of Section 2
and work will be started on Section
3 at once. The grade is being chang
ed from one to four inches-. It is
estimated that the job will take about
six weeks to finish.
BEST HOUV-UP*
MAW BEAtWtUJEJ
A*\'A F? ST COUSIN
J"O"TYP-WE.SPOD
TEN CENTS PE
GIANTS ANI
BATTL E 1
Game Called After E
Because by Darkne
Score 6
PLAY AGAIN THIS
Umpires Announce Thi
Be Resumed and C(
A Victo:
1
MATHEWSON IN
Veteran In Box Until the End Wear
ing Out The Three Opposing
Boston Pitchers.
The Game Today.
123456789
New York 0 1 0 0 1 0
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 0
BatteriesNew York, Marquardt
and Meyers. Boston, O'Brien and
Corrigan.
(By United Press)
BY GRANTLAND RICE.
Fenway Park, Boston, Oct. 10
One of the most desperately con
tested games in any world's series
ended here in a tie score when dark
ness forced the closing of the second
game of the series between the
Giants and the Rd Sox at the end
of the eleventh inning.
Three different pitchers, Collins,
Hall and Bedient, occupied the slab
in turn for the home team, while the
veteran Mathewson bore the brunt
trfelavoainning^ ofttfeBprnrtefloat
ing, winding up the afternoon's work'
by retiring his last three opponents
in order.
The Giants got off badly, putting
Mathewson in the hole in the first
inning when the Sox piled a three
run lead. Stahl's men continued in
front until the eighth inning, when
the strain proved too much for Col-
linB and the Giant stick wieldersf"
forced in three runs,took the lead for
the first time and sent Collins to the
bench.
The veteran Matty's victory was
short lived, however, as a double
and a single in the Sox's half put
them on even terms again. The
ninth was a blank for both sides in
the tenth the Giants went into the
lead with a margin of one run,
which the Sox promptly duplicated
in their half of the same inning.
Neither side scored in the elev
enth and the umpires called the con
test and announced that it would be
played off on this field this after
noon.
From start to finish the contest
was a heart-b*eaker, the strain
several" times being obvious in the
work of the opposing players.
Boston turned out its baseball
legions, over 30,000 strong, to wit
ness the game. The weather was
fair and the edge of a sharp wester
ly breeeze was somewhat dulled by
the sun. Long before the game be
gan all the best seats were taken
with only a tew bare spots nfear the
back fences
The New York fans, undismayed
by the defeat of the Giants TJuesday,
shouted approval at the fast practice
of the National leaguers
York crowd ireely took the B!
of the offered wag of 10
the Bostons would the
One o'clock found only a
ty spots in the imreserVed
bleachers, but .he main grad stand
filled slowlj
The score
2 34 5 789 1001
Boston 300 0 10010 1 .06
N
1 vk
^!i
^Jf~
&>
s*t-
A
ioooao 1\06
oi
BatteriesBoston. CollinsJ Hall,
Bedient and Corrigan.
Ne*r York: Mathewson aft Meyers
REAVES
Bagley, Oct 10.Miss B?Vi^i
and Walter Heavfes, of Bniddi, were
married this morninftr8t fcy 'Justiceevee
Blegen. This is
eouol
th
married by the judge j tlie first
license evecro issued in ^learwater
county
peoples i
tore
The Bemidji directore^^ro^Walter-,
Reaves as the stewar^Jj b* Com-)
mercial cWb fflfcpj* '**&*

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