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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 11, 1912, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-10-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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I
RAILROAD TIME CARDS.
SOO BATLBOAD
16* East Bound Leaves 1:54 ant
US West Bound Leaves 4:87 pm
lt Bast Bound Leaves S:46 pm
187 West Bound Leaves 10:88 am
OSXAT HOBTEBBH
88 West Bound Leaves 8:80 pm
84 Bast Bound Leaves 12:08 pm
16 West Bound Leaves 8:48 am
88 Bast Bound Leaves 2:80 am
106 North Bound Arrives 7:45 pm
100 8outh Bound Leaves 6:80 *m
Freight West Leaves at 93)0 am
JYelffht Bast Leaves at 8:80 pro
vnnrsBOTA nmsairATxoirA&
82 South Bound Leaves
81 North bound Leaves
14 South Bound Leaves
28 North Bound Leaves
Freight South Leaves at
Freight North Leaves at
vnrar., BED at
1 North Bound Leaves 8:86 pm
8 South Bound Leaves 10:80 am
8:16 am
0:16 pm
.11:46 pm
4:26 am
7:00 am
0:00 am
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
RUTH WIGHTMAN
TEACHER OF PIANO
Leschetitsky Method
Residence Studio
1002 Bemidji Avenue
Phone 168
MUS IC LESSONS
MISS SOPHIA MONSEN
TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY
Studio at 921 Beltrami Avenue
ALDEN M. REMFREY
Teacher o*
tolin, Piano and Band Instruments
PIANO TUNING
Leader Bemidji Band Phone 536
LAWYERS
GRAHAM M. TORRANCE
LAWYER
Mass Block Talsphons 68*
D. H. FISK
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Office second floor O'Leary-Bowser Bldg
PHYSICIANS, SUKGEONS
DB. ROWLAND GELM0RE
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
OfficeMiles Block
DR. E. A. SHANNON, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Offlcs in Mayo Block
'Phone Res. 'Phone 10'
DR. C. R. SANBORN
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office Miles Block
DR A. E. HENDERSON
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Over First National Bank. Bemidji, Mln
ffflc 'Phone 86 Residence 'Phone 73
BR SMITH
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office ID Winter Block
DR MAKCUM
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
othc* in Biayo Block
'Faun* l Residence Phone 11'
UJNEh W JOHNSON
PHY^IOAN AND SURGEON
Office over Securtly Bank
DENTISTS
DR. D. L. STANTON
DEN11ST
Office in Winter Block
DR T. TU0MY
DENTIST
1 National Bank Bids fi it
DR PALMER
DENTIST
Miles Block
Hint Work by Apolntmeat Only
NEW PUBLIC LIBRAE
OpeD dailv i-mepi -Minday I i.
7t. in -oinJhk reading r,,,
only I io I
TOM SMAHI
HHA AND TRANSFER
ATX AJTD PIANO &XOVXHQ
KM Pbonu 68 Kit America A v.
Office Pbone IS
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
1
E. IBERTS0N
UNDERTAKER and
COUNTY CORONER
405 Beltrami Ave. Bemidji, Minn.
CENTENARY OF THE TROUSER
Was Napoleon's Victorious Legion*
Who Brought That Garment
Into FasHion.
As nearly as can be ascertained it
8 a hundred years since Napoleon
3onaparte's soldiers introduced tke
M-ne style of leg wear which speed
ly secured recognition as the distinc
Uvely masculine garment of civilians
Ihroughout two continents.
In 1814the year before Waterloo
it was related as a current news
[tern of some importance that the
great duke of Wellington had been re
fused admittance to Almack's in Lon
don, because he presented himself
wearing trousers instead of the con
ventional breeches which the dress
regulations then in vogue demanded.
As a matter of historical fact trous
ers have been worn by various races
and by both sexes in all the ages oi
which any authentic records exist.
Generally speaking, trousers were re
garded in ancient times as symbolical
of inferiority or effeminacy. In the
triumphal processions of the Caesars,
for example, prisoners of war wore
them as a sign of defeat, while the
sturdy legs of Roman's victorious le
gions were bare below the bottom oj
the skirted or kilted coat of mail.
For the last hundred years or there
about trousers have been widely reo
ognized as the garments of authority,
the outward and visible sign of th
stronger sex, says the American Tail
or and Cutter. But that position has
not been won or maintained without a
struggle. Many attempts have been
made to trample dawn the tyranny of
trousers, as their rule has been called
many times has their superiority been
challenged. But so far their position
remains secure.
BEER BARRELS IN WARFARE
Used in English Army Maneuvers for
the Construction of a
Foot Bridge.
"The way they have in the army" of
getting across country, despite fire,
hail, snow and vapor, was illustrated
by a fine piece of handy-man work
during field training at Aldershot, Eng
land, recently.
The Third Infantry brigade found it
self obliged to retire. The enemy
were too strong in front. Unfortu
nately, however, the Basingstoke canal
stretched behind them.
This was the chance the Second
Essex had been locking for. They
commandeered hay xrom a neighbor
ing stack, lashed it into five-foot
square bales, wrapped these in tar
paulin wagon covers, and moored the
completed articles like rafts in the wa
ter Planks stretched from one to the
other enabled the whole battalion to
cross over in single file.
Meanwhile the Second Middlesex,
not to be beaten, borrowed half a doz
en empty beer barrels from an inn and
made'a light foot bridge.
The Somerset Light infantry find
ing plenty of cut timber in Pyestock
wood, made a fairly substantial tres
tle bridge in less than two hours,
across which all the vehicles of the
brigade were passed, the battalion fol
lowing in fours.
The Second Border regiment also
constructed a light barrel bridge, and
the whole brigade crossed the canal,
thanks to their handy men, without
mishap, the rear guard destroying the
bridges.
Maine's Greatest Crop.
The total sale of the Aroostook po
tato crop of 1911 is estimated at be
tween 14 000,000 and 15,000,000 bush
els, leaving betwen 2,000,000 and 3,-
000,000 bushels that were sent to the
starch factories, used for seed and
food purposes here in the country
or lost. It is figured that for crops
sold the average price was over $2 a
I barrel.
This means that Aroostook received
i for tbe crop of potatoes which it
I raised in 1911 between $1,650 000
I and $1,800,000. The exceptionally
good year has enco^aged the farm
ers, and their plans show that there
I will be no shrinkage of the acreage
this season It will not be increased,
however, to any appreciable extent.
Most of the Aroostook farmers be
lieve that the time has come to stop
Increasing the acreage and to devote
themselves to the problem of secur
ing further increase of the yield an
acre.
New Coal-Carrying Vessel.
An improved type of coal carrying
vessel has just been launched at
Blyth, Newcastle, England, which, in
opirion of experts, will begin a new
pra in the building of cargo ships. The
\e=fcel is constructed on what is
known as the "arch" pr'nciple, which,
it is claimed, offers important advant
ages over boats of tho ordinary type,
wnh i dead weight of 3,100 tons and
a diaft of 18 feet 4 iaches. It is as
serted to be the fastest collier built
and it will be used for coaling pur
poses in connection with the British
fleet. Smaller capital outlay, cheaper
maintenance, and increased rate of
speed are among the favorable fea
tures claimed for the vessel.
Artistic Birds' Nests.
For true art, one must look for the
virpos' nests. They are of the most
exquisite workmanship and really
lovely to behold. They are woven
BO carefully and compactly that the
tempests seldom dislodge them. The
little masses of lichens, plant down
and vine tendrils, looking for all the
world like baskets hung from the
crotches of trees, tind nearly always
well concealed by leaves, are prob
ably as safe depositories for eggs at
can be found in the bird world.
:..'H^4BS?fES
MONEY
CHEERFULLY
REFUNDED
THE BEMUm DAILY PIOHEER
Copyright Hart Schaffner & 1 arx
BEN SCHNEIDER, Pres.
Today fashionably clad boys wear Chinchilla Over-
coats. The smallest fellow, 3 to 10, get beautiful
grays, navys and reds, at $5 finer grades, including
browns are great up to $10.
Boys' convertable collar Overcoats loose-belt-
back Ulsterettes, warmth without weight weaves
Russian Overcoats and 3-4 Reefers, $5 to $12.
Underwear interest is up at top pitch and you'll
find us meeting if. Specially good is a pure-fibered
combed wool garments at $1.50. It only starts the
list. ^lany others at $1.00 to $5.00.
Just received, a large shipment of Gloves from
that master hand-wear maker, Adlers, at $1.50 alone-
You can get cape, suede, piques and other gloves,
$1.00 to $2.50.
When You Gome Here to See Our Fall Suits and Overcoats
you'll appreciate what it means to you to
have somebody do what we've done for you to have the
world's best fabrics selected by experts to have the
choicest model's picked out and set in array for your
choosing.
HERE are Suits and Overcoats of the best weaves
known the season offers many new colors, patterns,
weaves The new models are very striking English
ideas Americanized American designs, very smart.
Suits and Overcoats, $20, $22, $25 and $30.
HART SCHAFFNER & MARX have made for us some very choice
things exclusive weaves and styles. We'll show you unusual values at
$20.00 and $25.00.
Our Young Men's Department is planning to outdo all former sea-
sons, and the goods are here that will do it. The liveliest, snappiest lot of
Young Men's Suits and Overcoats ever produced at $15, $18, $20, $22, $25
and $30. Exceptional values at $20 and $25.
Sterling Quality In $ 15 Suits and Overcoats which means good $20
at $15 for Men and Young Men. They'll surprise you by their excellence.
Smart*fashions, all wool fabrics made for discriminating Men who want
something extra good. They're better by 50 per cent than the usual
$15 Suits and Overcoats.
The Styles and Qualities You Want In Boys' Clothe
trousers, $5.00.
naw? $5 to $8 50
Bemidji, Minn.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11,1912.
-r.. fif ft
That Wooly Boy Suitso strong and so sturdy
lookingthe very thing to increase a boy's self-
respect in excellent all-wool materials, norfolk or
double breasted styles some with extra pair of
Finer two-piece Suit styles, exclusive with us,
norfolks and double-breasted, in materials that do
honor to father, $6.50 to $12 others from $3.5*1
up, too.
The stinging lash of the most whipping wind, can't
pierce a heavy Sweater. Here's that shawl collar
one, unbelieveably light and amazingly warm, $5
More from $2.50 to $8.50. Rather have a, Macki-
MAIL ORDERS
PROMPTLY
ATTENDED
CHAS. COMINSKY, Sec. and Treas,

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