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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 12, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-10-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME 10. NUMBER 143.
BOSTON JUMPS
ONE ON NEW YORK
Superb Pitching of Wood Pulls Out
Odd Game Although Giants
Secured Most Hits.
WAGNER'S FIELDING SENSATION
Robbed Home Team of Three Hits By
Great WorkrRetired Devore
By Hard Throw Out.
PLAYERS SHARE WAS $147,571.70
Sixty Per Cent to Go to Winners
Total Attendance Figures
Placed at 137,004.
(By United Press.)
New York, Oct.- 12.The totai
players sahre of the receipts for the
four world's series games is:'
$147,571.70.
The total attendance to date is
137,004.
Total receipts $273,282.
Commission receives $27,308.50.
To be divided between the clubs
$98,381.77.
By Grantland Rice.
Brush Stadium, New York, Oct. 12.
Joe Wood repeated on Tesreau and
bhe New York Giants and as a re
sult the Red Sox returned to Boston
last night with the jump game once
more in their possession and the
Giants again one down.
Photo by American Press Association.
JAKE STAHL
Manager of the Boston Red Sox.
Smoky Wood, with a gray day to
help him out, was all there, with a
margin to spare. Tesreau was good
but not enough so to cope with the
marvel. Wood's effort was unques
tionably a big factor, but no small
share of the credit for the win must
go to a ball playing centipede by the
name of Heinie Wagner.
Photo by American Press Association.
JOHN J. McGRAW
Manager of the New York Giants.
The count was three to one and
but for Wagner's almost superhuman
work, the Giant attack would have
left a different story to be written of
Wood's day's efforts.
Great was the Mackian infield last
fall, buit it was never within reach of
Boston's great quartette yesterday.
The Giants hammered Wood for
nine hits and but for Wagner and
Yerkes would have run the count up
to thirteen and driven across at least
three more runs and possibly four.
Both teams played great ball and
PITCHER GEORGE WILTSE.
Giants' Veteran Southpaw May
Be Used In World's Scries.
Photo by American Press AsBOCiatloa.
ANNOUNCEMENT
"Bemidji looks good to me," said
Mr. Howard, "and this undertaking
means co-operation. The paper can-
not do it all, we must have the co-op-
eration of the advertisers as well as
the reading public. If we work well
together, I will guarantee as to satis-
fying results, both from the newspa-
per's angle and the advertiser's and
reader's view point.. Bemidji now
has a good daily paper better than
any published in a city of this size
in the state.. By working together
we can produce still a better paper.
The Pioneer
-*r.
For the benefit of it's advertisers
and readers, the Pioneer has been
laying"plans, that will eventually re-
sult in placing this paper into prac-
tically every home in Bemidji and
the sourrounding country.
E. D. Howard, who was formerly
employed by the Chicago American
and some of the larger eastern papers
has been engaged in the circulation
department of the Pioneer, both
Daily and Weekly and beginning
Monday will enter his new field.
-4i?f
*y
has the plant and men
capable of doing the work. You do
your part, Mr. Reader, and Business
Man, and we'll do ours."
In an early issue will appear our
special
premiumNofferv which will be
of interest to every wide awake house
wife in this community. Watch for
it. Boston won a deserved victory, al
though the Giants once more outhit
the American leaguers. The follow
ing attendance and receipts figures
were announced at the end of the
fourth world's series game:
Attendance 36,852
Gross receipts $76,644
Players' share $41,387.76
Commissioner receives .$7,6-64.40
To be divided among management
both clubs, $27,591.31.
The score:
12345678 9
RSd Sox 01010000 13
Giants 00000100 01
Batteries: Boston, Wood and Cady.
New York, Tesreau and Meyers.
BACK FROM DAKOTA.
E. Runyan of Turtle River was in
the city on business today. Mr.
Runyan is one of the old time farm
ers in that community and has just
returned from the Dakotas, where he
says that conditions were really
deplorable during the wet weather.
He is back to harvest his crops on
his Turtle River farm..
SCOOP
THE CUB
REPORTER
3&i
A^ S E BROKE
AHD WmAOOTA
TlCKfeT To 1\\s
g[ WORLD SERIES
HNOUGrHTb GEXIHT&SEE.
Tb MORROWS
BEMIDJI WINS
THE FINAL SCORE BETWEEN
BEMIDJI HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
TEAM AND THIEF RIVER FALLS
RESULTED IN A VICTORY FOR
THE LOCAL SCHOOL BY A SCORE
OF 12 TO 0.
THE THIEF RIVER BOYS PUT
UP A GOOD GAME AND LEFT ON
THE AFTERNOON TRAIN FOR
HOME
BASEBALL
Final results of today's game of
the world's series resulted as fol
lows:
12345678 9R. H. E.
Boston 002 00000 0 2 5 0
N. Y, 00000010 0 1 4 1
Batteries: Boston, Bidient and
Cady. New York, Mathewson and
Meyers.
This gives Boston three games to
New York's one.
EGGS ARE SCARCE.
In speaking of the egg market,
K. K. Roe said:
"Eggs 'have been scarce for the
past few weeks, but we are getting
in a good supply now. On our first
delivery this morning nearly every
order contained eggs." If eggs are
already scarce at this season of the
year, it is probable that they will be
higher than ever this winter.
AUTO SPEEDER IN COURT.
Chief Geil hailed a young woman
driver on the city streets this morn
ing and asked that she appear be
fore the judge Monday afternoon at
4:30. The chief said, "Too many
auto drivers are nto complying with,
the state law in regard to road rules
and the police have been instructed
to enforce them, wherever life may
be endangered."
SAVANNAH PRELATE SIXTY-FIVE
i Savannah, Ga., Oct. 12.Rt. Rev.
Benjamin J. Keiley, Roman Catholic
bishop of Savannah, will reach his
sixty-fifth birthday anniversary to
morrow. Bishop Keiley is a native
of Petersburg, Va., and was ordained
to the priesthood in 1873. He has
been at the head of the Savannah
diocess of twelve years.
IN MEMORY OF RIOT VICTIMS.
Mount Olive, 111., Oct. 12.The
fourteenth annual memorial demon
stration in honor of the four Muont
Olive boys who gave up their lives
in the strike riot at Virden, Oct. 12,
1898, was held here today. John
White, president of the United Mine
Workers of America, delivered the
memorial address. Large delegations
of miners from Belleville, Edwards
yille and other points were present.
The Home Influence.
"Henrietta," said Mr. Meektom.
"What is It, Leonidas?" "Suppose 1
stay at home and economize in order
to facilitate your public career and
employ my leisure hours in assisting
you with your speeches and magazine
articles" "Well?" "When you. are
prominent in public affairs, will you
be one of those who candidly admit
that they owe everything to their hus
bands?"Washington Star.
Pay for What You See.
Theaters in Havana, according to an
xohange, have a system by which pa
trons pay for a seat for one act, and, if
pleased, pay for another act,- and so
on to the end of the performance. By
this method a playgoer may keep on
trying different theaters till he finds a
play to his liking, and spend for his
various "samples" only the price that
he would pay^for one ticket, according
to our plan.
^MV .SCHEME.AS
COM^. OUT "TO THt
Bf i_\_ GiROOTAbS NH
THE. XEM 01* Nt&WT
6HD "TUNNEL OND1
'i .Li-* ^JsCyjS^'diH "**VIj&3Sa&^
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BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, SATUFDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 12, 1912.
ABWCIW8!inifia
CeyiihtJ
A
SAM FULLERTON INJURED
St. Paul, Oct. 12.Sam Fullerton,
deputy sate fire marshal, was hurt
in a wreck at Chisholm a few days
ago and is confined to the hospital
there, according to word received
from him yesterday morning by State
Fire Marsal Keller. His back was
sprained and he was badly shaken
up ut is not in a serious condition.
GOVERNOR OPENS TEXAS FAIR.
Dallas, Texas, Oct. 12.The twen
ty-seventh annual Texas state fair,
bigger and better than any of its
predecessors, was opened today with
an address by Governor Colquitt.
An excellent racing program was in
augurated this afternoon and will be
continued until the fair closes Octo
ber 27.
A i ^ANOTHER BITTER DISAPPOINTMENT
Business Boomers
The difference between a dead town and alive town is
the difference between dead merchants and live mer-
chants. Some merchants are so dead or free from enter-
prise that it takes sizzling hot thrusts to awaken enough
life in them to even penetrate the outermost rim of busi-
ness progress. They will sijb around endeavoring to catch
trade that comesfbo town without offering inducements to
draw business,, j^jrtell tjte public j^at they do not ad-
vertise in th^newspapers but give their trade the benefit
of the little money they might spend in advertising by
giving them more for their money than the advertiser
which they know is a falsehood. The advertiser always
gives more and better goods for the money than the mer-
chant who doesn't advertise, for the advertiser's goods are
turned quicker and are always new and up-to-date. Be-
sides the advertiser is the town boomer, while the non-ad
vertiser is the town sponger. The advertiser, through
the medium of his ads, is reaching out and bringing new
people to town to trade and is thus both directly and in-
directly advertising the town. There is a way in which
every person trading in this town can help the town and
that is to encourage enterprise by patronizing the mer-
chant- who does advertise. That's one way to boom a
town that should have our admiration.
i~ This is the first of a series of articles prepared for
the merchant who wants a better business. Our aim is
to be of service to the enterprising merchant.
Copyright 1912 by Geo. E." Patterson.
LAMBERT TO LEAVE' BEMIDJI
Accepts Position With McCloud Riv-
er Lumber company.
F. H. Lambert, who has been con
nected with the Crookston Lumber
company of this city, will leave for
McCloud, California, sometime be
fore November 1, where he has ac
cepted a position with the McCloud
River Lumber company of that city.
This sudden change comes as a sur
prise to many of his friends. His
family will leave with him, but will
go to Seattle Washington, where
Mrs. Lambert will visit with her
parents for a month. Before leav
ing for the west, the Lamberts will
visit friends and relatives a their
former home in Royalton,- Minne-
sota.
It Was A Good Scheme, Scoop, BU By "HOP
-rtiffti ^l^Y-rri-TiftTti,,
''McM-sx^z^
'WHAT'9 I
tea voo
ABOUT wgi
ACATAI
fcimOSATOfl!!
DISTRICT8JCONSOLIDATES
Votes 26 to 1 to combine two Schools
and Locate One Good One at
Shotley in Future.
OTHERS GET EXTRA STATE AID
By a vote of 26 to 1, school dis
trict 82, located in Shotley, voted
thiB~'"Weefc tp combine and the two
schools wild heVthrown together.V At.
present there are two school Souses
in he district. This will be he fifth
consolidated school district in the
county and will put Beltrami among
the state leaders.
W. B. Sewart, county superintend
ent of schools, announced this morn
ing that he had received a letter
from E. M. Phillips, state rural school
commissioner, that the following
amounts thad been allowed as aid to
Beltrami consolidated schools:
Hines
Annual aid, .$ 750.00
Building aid, 1500.00
Special aid 300.00
Tenstrike
Annual aid,
Building aid,
Special aid,
$1500.00
773.50 650.00
Saum
Annual aid, $ 750.00
Building aid 1500.00
Special aid, 300.00
Total aid for county. .$8023.50
The annual aid is apportioned ac
cording to the number of scholars,
the building aid is one-fourth of the
amount the district has put into the
building, building to exceed $6,000
in value, and the special aid is vtoed
to assist schools that are graded or
semi-graded. Two of the districts
received all of the building aid al
lowable.
PLIGHTED AT ALTAR
Cleveland, O., Oct. 12.Miss
Martha Calhoun and Wilson B.
Hickox, whose engagement was re
newed after having once been brok
en, were maried in this city today.
The bride is the oldeset^daughter of
Patrick Calhoun, the millionaire
traction magnate of Cleveland and
San Francisco. The bridegroom is
a prominent clubman and has been
rated as Cleveland's wealthies"'
lor.
i
Bemidji and Thief River Falls Start
ed at Each Other When Whittle^
Blew at 2 p. m. -^^fe
GOOD DAY FOR FOOTBALL
Early Sun Dried Off Field While Cool.
Weather Materially Aida the
Players.
SUPPER IN CITY KALL
Will Be Served at 5 p. m. by High
School GirlsAll Food to Be
Home Cooked.
Full of ginger and "pep", the Thief
River Falls football team arrived in
the city at 10 a. m. this morning
and this afternon met the Bemidji
high school team at the fair grounds
A bright sun early this morning
dried the frost off the field so that
the men had firm footing. Cloudy
skies with a cool breeze made the day
ideal for fotoball.
The game was started promptly at
2 p. m~ so that the Thief River team
could catch the Soo train for home.
Both teams arrived on the grounds
shortly before 2 o'clock and were
greeted by cheers from the high
school students and other spectators
gathered on the side lines.
The Bemidji boys warmed up fast
and surprised the crowd by the speed
with which they ran through their^
signals. Thief River was not as fasjt
but the team as a whole looked'
heavier and able to give Bemidji a
good game. Both teams lined up full'
of confidence at the first whistle of
:the referee, ^-^^v^^^^^^^^s^r
Bemidji was somew^t 'weakened^
on the line by the absence of John
son who was forced 'to the second,
team because of being low in his
studies. Graham missed several
nights of practice and Jim Sulivan
was not out Friday night. Klein rwas
tried out for Johnson's place, but the
line was shifted in practice so that
Elletson could play there if needed.
Stanton was given practice in
both center and left half yesterday so
that the team this afternoon was able
to shift as needed. Captain Bailey
did not uncork all of his dazzlers as
he is saving a good assortment of
plays for Grand Rapids. The play
today was a succession of line
bucks, cross bucks and a few for
ward passes.
At 5 o'clock this afternoon, the
girls of the high school will serve a
home cooked supper in the city hall
in order to raise funds for he athletic
association. The association had fif
teen cents in the treasury when the
game was started today and de
pends on the receipts from this game
and the supper tonight to pay the ex
penses of the Thief River Falls team
and leave a balance in the treasury.
Many high school students and sev
oral members of the faculty are plan
ning to accompany the team when it
goes to Grand Rapids a week from
today. The team will leave here at
noon and will play shortly after its
arrived in Grand Rapids.
4 ^4*^*^***^*
SUNDAY IN THE CHURCHES
$
Swedish Lutheran.
There will no services Sunday.
Sunday school at 12.
Presbyterian.
Sunday school at 10 o'clock.-
Morning preaching service at 11..
Junior C. E. at 4 p. m. Senior C.
E. at 7 and evening preaching at 8
o'clock.
Mr. Arthur Currier will occupy
the pulpit both morning and evening.
Regular mid-week prayer meeting
on Thursday evening at 8 o'clock.
The public is cordially invited to all
these services.
S. E. P. White, pastor.
I. 0. 0. F. CONFER DEGREE
A a regular session of the local
lodge of the Independent Order of
Odd Fellows, held in their hall last
evening, the second degree was con
ferred upon Dr. Lawrence Isgrygg.
The lodge was extended an Invitation
from the Rebeccas, of this order, to
attend their reception and banquet,
which will be held in the Odd Fel
lows hall next Wednesday evening.
The invitation .was heartily accepted
and is expected that a large num
ber will bo in attendance on that
evening.
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