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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, October 15, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-10-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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DOCTORS SAY THAT THERE IS GRAVE
DANGER FROM BLOOD POISONING
Bullet Carried Rust and Particles of Clothing and
Papers into Colonel's Body After Passing Through
His Spectacle Case
ASSAILANT GAVE NAME OF JOHN SCHRANK
Is Now Being Held in County Jail Under $5,000 Bond
to Await Action of Next Term of Municipal Court
Which Convenes December 10.
OPERATION PERFORMED THIS AFTERNOON
Physicians Ascertained Early Today That the lead Did
Not Reach a Vital Spot-Will Quit Campaigning
and Be Removed to Oyster Bay
(By United Press.)
New York, Oct. 15.2:15 p. m.Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt with her son
Theodore and daughter Ethel, left suddenly for Chicago on the Twentieth
Century Limited this afternoon.
New York, Oct. 15, 1:45 p. m.Mrs. Roosevelt, her daughter Ethel and
Mrs. J. W. Roosevelt went to Progressive headquarters just before noon,
and in to the private of George W. Perkins listened over the telephone tov
Chicago. "While shocked by the occurance," *aid Mrs. Roosevelt, "I am1
hopeful and the latest word that my husband is in no danger allayed some
of my fears. My son Theodore will go to Chicago on the limited this af-
ternoon and if possible will birng the Colonel home at once. My own plans
will depend upon what Mr. Lambert learns by telephone from Dr. Murphy.
We want the Colonel with us at Oyster Bay, and hope to have him there
very soon."
Reservations have been held for Mrs. Roosevelt and members of her
family on the Limited should it be necessary for her to go to Chicago.
St. Paul, Oct. 15, 1:45 p. m.The following statement of Roosevelt's
condition was issued from Mercy Hospital shortly before noon: "Bullet lodg-
ed in chest one inch below right nipple without striking any vital spot
bullet ranged upward and inward for distance of four inches into chest wall.
No evidence that bullet penetrated Ming. Pulse is 90 temperature 99.2
resperation 20 leucorite count 8-200. No operation to remove bullet will
be made at present time. Condition is hopeful but wound is sore. Abso-
lute rest is demanded for number of days." John D. Murphy and Arthur
S."Curry. L. Terrell, R. G. Sayyl, attending physicians.
PRESS BULLETIN AT 1:30 P. M.
Milwaukee, Oct. 15.Schrank was arraigned in district court at 10 a. m.
this morning. He pleaded guilty to the charge of assault with intent to
kill and was bound over under $5,000 bail to the next term of municipal
court which convened December 10.
(By United Press.)
Milwaukee, Oct. 15., 1 p. m.John Schrank, the man who attempted the
assassination of Roosevelt here last night showed no emotion at noon today
when a warrant charging him with "assault with intent to kill and murder1
Theodore Roosevelt" was served on him in his cell in the county jail.
"Why did you shoot Colonel Roosevelt," he was asked. I read stories
about him in the New York World and Herald," replied Schrank'" and I
thought he was crazy to seek a third term. I followed him from Montgom-
ery, Chattanooga and Atlanta all through the south waiting for a chance.
I do not care what they do with me. I am only sorry that my intentions
were not realized and that I failed to kill Roosevelt."
He gave his name as John Schrank, East Sixteenth Street, New York, and
said that he had worked in a hotel of which one of his relatives was the
proprietor.
"I followed him since September 10. September 14 was the date on whieh
President McXinley died after being shot by Czolgosh."
When searched, Schrank was found to have 157 clippings concerning
Roosevelt in his pocket and also the itinery of the present trip. Schrank
is about thirty-six years old and some five feet seven inches tall. He is
a German and a well known bowery character in New York.
Chicago, Oct., 15.Bulletin at 10 a. m.Colonel Roosevelt will do no
more campaigning this year. Positive announcement that the injury to
the presidential nominee was serious enough to keep him off the road during
the remainder of the campaign was made known at Mercy Hospital this
morning after the examination by the doctors.
As soon as he is able to leave this city, Roosevelt will be taken to Oyster
Bay where he will remain at home until he is completely mended and he will
take no further active part in the campaign. The fact that his injury was
nidi that it would force him into retirement for some time was pointed out
pt Roosevelt by surgeons at the hospital. They were emphatic in telling
him that to insure his complete recovery he would have to remain quiet for
several weeks.
jThe Colonel reluctantly agreed but insisted at the same time that he felt
'perfectly well" and could go back campaigning in twenty-four hours.
Chicago, Oct. 15.'10%. m.Colonel Roosevelt, who-was last night shot
by a fanatic in Milwaukee this morning said that he "was not feeling so
bad." His condition' nevertheless, is admittedly serious. Surgeons located1
the bnllet lodged under the tenth rib against the wall of the chest.
CCoBttmud OB last pace.)
i iiir
CROWDS WAIT FOR
BRINKMAN SEATS
Hundreds lane Walk Until First
Audience Leaves Boom at Home
Talent Vaudeville.
SUCCESS BEYOND DREAMS
Receipts for Monday Evening Said
Close to $163 and S. R. 0. Sign
Needed.
SECOND PRODUCTION TONIGHT
Will Be Started at 7:30 and Repeated
at 8:45Every Number to Be
New.
Few entertainers are ever present-
ed with a first night audience that
taxed their theatre to the extent that
the Brinkman was taxed last night
for he first of the series of home tal-
ent acts to be presented this week.
As early as 7 o'clock the crowd began
drifting toward the theatre and by
7:30 the S. R. O. sign would nave
been hung out had Mrs. Brinkman
been able to secure one. As it was,
the crowd lined the sidewalk until
8:30 wnen a second performance
was given. Mrs. Sanborn reports re
ceipts of |163.
Those who attended the perform
ance were not anxious to say which
selection they liked the best. Mrs.
Sanborn and Miss Humes, in their
Colonial Act, reached a place not
touched by the other numbers and
were in a class by themselves. Mrs.
Sanborn has played before Bemidji
audiences many times and received
a demonstration as she came on the
stage.
"Dear Old Moonlight," sung by a
chorus of girls dressed in white who
carried baskets of flowers and by men
in dark coats and light trousers, not
only seemed to please the audience
musically but proved to be an effec
tive piece of stage work. "Teasing
Moon" also called for moonlight ef
fects and Miss Wightman and her
chorus were liberally encored.
Vera Cutter and Vera Dempsey,
two tiny tots, were assisted by Louis
Brown and his violin in giving their
Dutch dance. They were called back
several times. Louis Brown looked
thoroughly Dutch in his wooden
shoes and Dutch costume while the
girls might have come direct from
Ellis Island.
"I'll Meet You at Half Past Two"
called for the encore "Oh, John" from
the Misses Lycan and Humes. Their
numbers had been presented in Cass
Lake so that they were thoroughly
familiar with both music and dances.
MiBS Lycan has lived in Bemidji sev
eral years and Miss Humes is so well
known here that both received dem
onstrations as they came on the stage.
"Rum Turn Tiddle" closed the pro
gram and was encored until the sing
ers were tired. "That Melodious
Strain" is being whistled on the
streets of Bemidji today.
This evening, a second program
will be presented and a third to
morrow night. Nothing in either
(Continued on last page).
SCOOP
CU
TOB
REPORTER
AS ABOUT TO ENTER THE MILWAUKEE AUDITORIUM
(CooyrlcnH
HILL HELPED DEMOCRATS
Gave $15,000 to Harmon Campaign
Fund According to Testimony
Before Clapp Committee.
RYAN SPENT SMALL FORTUNE
(By United Press.)
Washington, Oct. 15.Campaign
contributions by Thomas Fortune
Ryan, millionaire railroad magnate,
were"$77,000 to the presidential cam
paign of Governor Harmon of Ohio,
and $35,000 to that of Representative
Underwood.
This fact was divulged to the Clapp
committee investigating campaign
fund contributions, at its session yes
terday afternoon.
Lieutenant Colonel Nichols, of
Ohio, Harmon's manager, told of the
receipt of $77,000 from Ryan and
also $15,000 from James J. Hill, of
St. Paul.
The total Harmon contributions
were $122,000 and the expenditures
$146,000, Governor Harmon making
good the deficit.
Senator Bankhead of Alabama,
pre-convention manager for Repre-
sentative Underwood, said his total
receipts, including Ryan's $35,000
contribution, were $52,000. Sena-
tor Bankhead denied that the South-
ern railway or the Standard Oil gave
directly or indirectly.
Late in the afternoon the -commit
tee issued m. subpoena for Mr. Ryan
to appear for examination today.
Roger Sullivan of Chicago testi
fied that the presidential primaries
in Illinois were "mostly incidential"
to his fight with the Hearst-Harri
man crowd which cost him $50,000,
he said.
PUMPKIN PIE TIME
Year
1884 1885 1886
1887
1888 1889 1890 1903 1905 1906
1907 1908 1909 1910 1911
Winner
CHRISTIAN CHURCH CONVENTION
Louisville, Ky., Oct. 15.The
Christian churches, or Disciples of
Christ, began their international con
vention in this city today. This de
nomination, which began about
eighty-five years ago under the lead
ership of Dr. Alexander Campbell, is
now more than a million strong.
Delegates and visitors are her-e from
foreign countries. Fully 20,000 are
expected by tomorrow.
While the annual review of the
missionary and other branches of
church work will occupy much of the
time of the convention, other .matters
are slated for* attention that promise
to make the convention one of un
usual interest and importance. For
some years a committee on unifica
tion has been at work, and will re
port in favor, so it is understood, of
one convention, somewhat on the
lines of the Baptists. It is believed
that the report of the committee will
provoke spirited discussion.
MEET OF LIFE UNDERWRITERS
Memphis, Tenn., Oc. 15.Noted
insurance men from all parts of the
country gathered in this city today
for the annual meeting of the Na
tional Association of Life Under
writers. The sessions will continue
until Friday.
WORLD'S BASEBALL SERIES OF FORMER TEARS
League
Providence Chicago St. Louis
Detroit New York
New York
Brooklyn Boston New York
Chicago Chicago
Chicago
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia Philadelphia
Every Good Sporting Editor Employs A Bouncer
Loser St. Louis
Metropolitans Chicago St. Louis
St. Louis
Brooklyn Louisville Pittsburg Philadelphia
Chicago Detroit Detroit Detroit
Chicago New York
National National
A. A.
National National National National
American
National
American
National National
National
American American
League
A. A.
A. A.
National
A. A.
A. A.
A. A.
A. A.
National
American
National
American American American
National National
GIANTS
Games
33 30 42
104
33 33
41 41 43
40 50 43
.#1
42
BANQUET AT I. 0. 0. F. HALL.
Wednesday Evening a Joint Social
Session of Two Lodges Will
Meet.
The local lodge of Rebeccas will
entertain their members and friends
and also the membew of the I. O. O. F.
local lodge at a joint progressive
game and dancing party Wednes
day evening, October 16. After the
party s, banquet will be served.
Mrs. Clara Carlson, of Kelly Lake,
assembly president of the Rebeccas,
will be the special guest of the even
ing.
The Odd Fellows are planning to
turn out in large numbers and it is
predicted that this joint meeting will
be one of the largest ever held in the
local hall. There are more than 100
members belonging to the local or
der and nearly all of them have ex
pressed a desire to attend.
LIVE ALLIGATORS HERE.
E. A. Barxer and company this
morning received two live alligators
from Florida. They are being used
in the Barker window display for a
.-:^'-r
few days. ~,:.A-S^::
BY 5 TO 2 COUNT
Knock O'Brien Out of the Box in
First Inning But Fail to Scott
On Collins.
GAME WAS SIXTH OF CTrayy
New York Has Won Two, Boston
Three and One Was Flayed to
A Tie.
TESREAU AND WOOD TODAY
If Former Wins, Red Sox Will Have
Chance at Final on Their Home
Grounds.
(By United Press.)
FINAL BASEBALL TODAY.
R. H. E.
Boston 4 ,1 2
New York 16
Press Box, Stadium, New York,
Oct. 15.Driven to bay, the Gianls
led a last rushing desperate assault
against the Red Sox machine yester
day in the sixth game of the world's
series and tore it apart within one
round. Marquard pitched his pals
to a romping cakewalk victory by
the count of 5 to 2.
The Rube, as in his first start,
broke the Boston attack at every
turn and after one rickety round,
the .second, stopped Stahl's slashing
sluggers with a thud.
Today the Giants are back at Bos
ton for another game stand where
Jeff Tesreau and Joe Wood hook up
for their third clash.
The first round at the Polo Grounds
yesterday settled the battle. StaMJ'
stuck in "Buck" O'Brien and th
Grants were ready.
Knowing that they were fighting"
with their backs to the wall, the Red
Sox spitballist fought with such sav
age fierceness that he was--on the
ropes in a twinkling, and he was
slammed for six hits and five runs
before Stahl coud get another pitch
er warmed up and into the fray. _^
Ray Collins followed O'Brien in
the second round, rolling back. th
Giants' rushes with wonderful pit
chingsure and effectivebut his
brilliant work went to seed.
For working on that five-run lead
the Rube, after one short lapse
through over-confidence, settled to his
task and breezed along under wraps."
From the second round on he was
never in trouble and sharp, sure sup
port by his ma+es
c-Su
TAKE ONE
did the rest.
That first assault on O'Brien was
a clumsy one. Doyle led with a nit
and a steal. Then with two out
Murray singled, Merkle doubled,
Herzog doubled, Meyers singled, and
Fletcher dumped a bunt which'
squeezed the Indian over with the
fifth run.
But this wasn't all, for, in the mid
die of that wild melee, O'Brien walk
ed Doyle home with the first run,
(Continued on last pace).
"HOP
*m
&*&
a
4 S
Tesreau and Wood were batteries
today.
(Written by Grantland Rice*}
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