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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, November 04, 1912, Image 1

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UB aad
District
District Xo
Birch Blackduck Frohn Hornet
'Langor
Xorthern Moose Lake
Port Hope
Summit
Ta-v lor
Turtle Lake
Turtle River
Unorganized
Districts
TABL E PREPARE AUDITO GEORGE
SHOW S COUNT ROA KPENDlTURiS
Mony
District No
Baudette ChilgTen Gudrid
Lakewood
McDougrald Myhre Spooner
Rapid River
Walhalla Wabamca Zippel
Contracts
Unconplited
2
1,552 94
73 33
500 00
300 00
500 00
District Xo
Alaska
Buzzle Benville Eckles Grant Valle
Hamre
Jones Liberty
Lee Lammers
Maule Ridge
Minnie Roosevelt Spruce Grove
Steenerson
3
302 65
1,067 84
300 00
250 00
3 15
583 80
District Xo
Battle Cormant
Durand Eland
Hagait Kelliher Xebish Obrien
Quiring
Shotle\
125 00
341,00
5
12 53
280 8 67
1 379 3
601 16
440 84 206 00
1 329 62
31 2"
14 20
1 322 00
152 43
16 93
Grand Totals, $15,354 16
COMMUNICATION
Bemidji, Minn Nov 2, 1912
Editor Bemidji Pioneer
There appeared the last issue
of ''Though," the Socialist organ of
this city what purported to be a ser
mon by "Father" W. Ross of St.
Alban's church, Superior, upholding
the doctrines of Socialism, thereby
attempting to give the impression
that Catholic priests are in sympathy
with the fundamental principles of
that party
The fact is, however, that '"Fath-
er" Ross is an Episcopal minister, as
may be seen from the following let
ter Bishops House, Superior, Wis, Oct
30, 1912
Mr Patrick Russell,
Bemidji, Minn.
Dear Sir-In answer to your let
ter of the 29th addressed to Bishop
Schznner, I desire to say that the
Rev. M. W. Ross of St. Alban's
church of this city is an Episcopal
minister and not a Catholic priest
Sincerely yours,
J. A Pilon, Secty
Thanking you for giving the fore
going space your columns, I am
Yours truly,
P. J. Russell.
SOME ELECTION ODDITIES.
Washington, D. Nov. ,4.Ac-
cording to figures gathered by the
Bureau of Statistics, upwards of
15,000,000 citizens of the United
States will record their votes for
president in the election Tuesday. A
total of about 1,400,000 women, in
the states of California, Colorado,
Idaho, Washington, Utah and Wyom
ing, are eligible to vote.
By no means all the men of twen
ty-one in the country are qualified
voters, for the varying law* of the
states not only bar convicts in the
prisons in most cases, but place other
restrictions on suffrage that became
exceedingly important in presiden
tial years.
As nearly every state bars convicts
from voting and there are about
150,000 convicts in the prisons' of
the country,election day will mean
t3*SftVS **V
Figures Given Are For the Work Done Or To Be Bone Baring the (Mr-
rent YearIndicate Amounts Given and Beceived from All
Townships and Commiss3me?s' Districts. I
The following statement has been prepared- by County Auditor George
and shows the amounty of money to be spent for good roads in each
township of the county during the year IB12 for good roads. The state-
ment also shows the tax levy for each township. The difference be-
tween the amount -spent and the tax levy i& the amount that the^ people
of that town received or paid to help other towns. It will be noticed
that by adding the figures in the last column by districts th at the total
levy .for any one district may so be .found. It is not,the 4uty of the
county auditor to prepare such tables but Mr." George worked several
nights last week doing this order that the voters might know where
their money was expended.
STATEMENT OF 1911 COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE LEVY, AND OP
MONEY EXPENDED AND TO BE EXPENDED IN 1912, IN EACH
TOWN AND COMMISSIONER DISTRICT:
Town
Tola! Expended
District Xo
Bemidji
I
District
Total
&
$602.40 $206.00
347 00
73 33
$808 40
Villages, 1,552.94
73 33
500.00
300 00
500 00
190 00
4
194
723 33
3 15
9 78
2,1*6.78
28 95
311 31
560 06
832 60
300 00
3,346.60
Villages,
302 65
1,082 00 2,149 84
300 00
250 00
3 15
773 80
3,779 44
Villages,
194
340 00 1,063.3?
3 15
9 78
3,7 40.78:
28 95
311 31
^6&5-0
5173 60*
300 0
1,604 Q0
7,317.90
V?"
12 53
2.80 8 67,
1 37 39
601 16
646 84
2 651 62
31 25
14 20
206 00 358 43 5,706 89
Villages,
16 93
$5 622 00
U. T. C. TO
I
1911
$808 40
347 00
73 33
Totil
Levy Tai Levy
$134 62 $134.62
3,444.80
98.74
115.23
81.66 69.20 53.81
34 21
83 69
90.22
36.40 63 03
39 51 765.70
788.23
185 38
123 64
54.20
110.05
170.37
59.46
113 15
128.92
59 17
168 88
184 80
16.66
127.50
31.55
15 95 1,549 68
45 04
160 96
rj i73.99
211 40
9153
261.06,
334 43
292 04
268,43
63.46 55V76-
*2v~
14037 220.12
219.13 217 75
140 42
332 83
72 86
205 63
300 98
116 82
231 44
155 53
i-h- o- Si" ~H
%9ia 05
"~~"~j,
i
'ih-Z,
2,353 78
261 77
16 93
$20,976 16
867 65
$12,160 14
GIVE DANCES.
k,4- 0
For Crookston Trip.
The Bemidji Council of the United
Commercial Travelers have arranged
for a series of dances to be held
througout the coming winter months,
the first of the series to be held at the
City hall Friday evening, November
15
The plan of the committee is to
include special features from time to
time that will add to the pleasure of
those attending. In addition to this
light refreshments will be served.
The season dances will consist of
a series of seven dances given at in
tervals of two weeks. Tickets for
the entire season will be sold at $5.
and single dances will be one dollar.
During last winter this Council gave
one dancing party and repeated re
quests have been made to give more
The series of dances is just one of
the plans under way, the proceeds of
which will be placed in a fund, to
ward defraying expenses of the local
council to attend the state conven
tion at Crookston next summer
The members plan on going'there in
a body and will if possible take the
Eemidji band with them. This will
mean a great advertising feature for
the city as well as the U. C. or
der.
1
REPORTER
SCOOP
SCOOF-YoHoereow!
TAfce- THESE SAMPLE^
*AM_QT5 OuVHl
PASS 'EMARQU NP
ON THE. STREETV
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 162, BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, H0VEMBER 4,%tl?
CAPITOL
IS NEAR
CAPTURE
(By United Press). *_
Sofia, Nov. 4.Constantinople is
tottering and her fall is hourly ex
peeted. ~sM* i'^: i
Berlin, Nov. 4.Either by exterm
ination or bjL capture, the Bulgarians
today had practically cleared East
ern Turkey of Ottoman troops down
to the last line of the Constantinople
defences.
Vienna, Nov. 4.Terriflic fighting
between Turks and Bulgarians is in
progress just outside Constantinople.
Today rioting has broken out in the
city itself. Starving inhabitants are
seizing food commandered by the
government to feed the troops.
HOLD KLEIN FUNERAL
The funeral of Mrs. W. C. Klein,
who died Saturday morning, will be
held at 2 p. m. tomorrow afternoon
from the Klein residence on Bemidji
avenue. Reverends White and Ran
dahl will officiate.
GOOD WEATHER PROMISED
(By United Press).
Washington, Nov. 4."The finest
ever" was the prediction today by the
United States weather bureau for
Tuesday^The weather man. promis
ed clear skies and warm temperature
practicallj throughout -the United
States^ Jk
i% J. s%
"FOR LADIES ONLY
According to the corrupt practices
act, it is illegal to use any convey
ances to take voters to the polls
Ladies should not go to the polls to
morrow in rigs which they do not
own.
The day is a legal holiday for
banks Saloons will also be closed.
DISPLAY IN CEDAB RAPIDS.
Al Kaiser, the Bagley banker, who
returned home yesterday after a trip
to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has inaugu
rated a plan wnich will materially
augment the plan of exhibits in out
side state undertaken by the North
ern Minnesota Development associa
tion.
Mr. Kaiser decided to place an
agent at Cedar Rapids and securing
a room in the offices of the Sixteenth
Avenue Realty company of that
place assembled an exhibit, following
the close of the Clearwater county
fair, laying special stress on alfala,
timothy and clover, and twenty na
tive grasses, corn, vegetables, and a
specially fine exhibit of potatoes.
The exhibit weighted 1,800 pounds.
This was arranged in the land office
referred to, with a good window dis-_
play and placed in charge of C. R.
Kris formerly of Bagley, who will
devote his entire time to interesting
Iowans and others passing through
there, in Clearkater county lands.
The fact that the exhibit is there,
however, will advertise not only
Clearwater county, but all of North
ern Minnesota, and the idea ia one
that can pe employed by other land
dealers who have agencies in other
states farther sounth.
Many of those who saw the Clear
water* display at Cedar" Rapids would
not have believed all the things were
raised in Clearwater county, had\ not
Mr. Kriz been personally on ^-the
ground.
SDLLTfAN-WEINGART
Blackduck Business Men Celebrate In
Honor of Marriage of One of
Their Number.
WEDDING IN IOWA WEDNESDAY
3^J. dGsSHHiya, ^aseweler: and auto
dealer of Blackduck, was the guest of
nonajr at a-stagj'sunper given by
J* Si. Reed |ast *Biursday,-"evening.
Sullivan left Blackduck Thurs
day night for Iowa where he is to
wed Miss Clara Weingart. a former
Blackduck teacher, on Wednesday of
i his week. The guests were all Black
duck business and professional men
who .have known Mx* Sullivan^for.
some lime. i.
Dr. John Koch acted as toast
master and the responses did not
spare the guest of honor. The fol
lowing responses were made*
As An Old FriendJesse Dade.
Ole's* Experience and its Lessons,
Reed.
An Unmarried Man's Advice, Wes
ley Peik.
A Married Man's Advice, John
Cann
The Future Mrs. Sullivan, Charles
Hayden.
Jim As srBachelor, E. N. Smith.
Jim As a Benedict, Dr. Roy Gard
ner.
Autos and School Teachers, Dr. J.
M. Freeburg."8
How Do I Peel? Mr. Sullivan.
The following men were the guests
of Mr. Reed.: Bert Smithy Jesse Dade,
H. M. Latterell, A. E. Witting, John
Cann, C. ~W. Conway, Wesley Peik,
Dr. Roy Gardner, E. N. Smith, Charl
es Hayden, Dr. John Koch, E N.
French, E. Oberg, C.W Dudley,
Dr. J. M. Freeburg and Mr: Sullivan.
ADDITIONAL SOCIETY
Earl Carson and A. D. Bailey, high
school instructors, spent Sunday as
^guests at the Klein farm.
Miss Elsie Schmitt entertained at
Hallowe'en supper Friday evenings
^he entertained a 'dwfcen* guests.
Wmr V? Hanson was taken to St.
Anthony's, hospital this morning
with a severe attack of typhoid fev
er. Mn Hanson has *een employed
by Graham and Doran, butchers.
Scoop's Finger Didn't Hit The Right Name
-gisr^
Little Miss adver
tised a reward for the
return of her pet fox
terrier on Tuesday.
JO Wednesday she
recovered her own
'^Bouncer" and ileight
other dogs.
$ Wait
getters.
PLEAD FOB GOOD BOADS
Other names added to List Published
in Saturday Pioneer.
Several more farmers have added
their names to the list of men who
are working for and want Amend
ment 1 to be passed tomorrow. The
list was printed Saturday in the Pio
neer These men say that the Dunn
amendment which is number 1 on
the pink ballot, will relieve them of
a part of the burden of taking care
of the roads by lifting it from their
shoulders and placing it upon the
shoulders of the large cities which
are equally benefitted by our gootr
roads The Dunn amendment will
tax iron range and city property to
make a fund with which Northern
Minnesota can make good roads
Following are additional names.
W. G. Schroeder, Harry Bachle,
B. Bardwell, J. H. French, Fred Bard
well, Frank Clarke, Joe Steidle, Al
bert Pedersen, E. J. Parks, N. G. Rey
nolds, F. Schroeder, Loren Coyle.
H. C. Geil, Charles Cramer, and John
Morrison.
*~s^*^.
HOBNET.
Benson and Potter of Blackduck,
have charge of a camp on the Jesse
Fisher place.
Isaiah Booth, who has been visitr
ing his sister, Mrs. Miller, for the
past three weeks, left on-Friday for
his home in Iowa.
Myrtle Miller spent a few days at
her home, returning to Blackduck on
Wednesday.
Miss Anna Anvid and Mrs. J. D.
Bogart went to
evening.
George Bogart and wife, Mrs.. Mur
ray and daughter Eva, went to,
Blackduck on Saturday.
E* rrr
SI
^-*J *aa?r
DAYTON LIKES POTATOES
Head of Minneapolis Store Thanks
T. .Burke for Samples
Given In June.
YIELD TWENTY-TWO TO ONE
Burke*e ^Wljen the Minneapols jobbers wer
in Bemidji June 19
onT
#^1%*Mi?neS?ta'
their tour of
P^sgentjoi^tlie^^rorthern Groeery
coinpany,". presented George D. Day
ton, -president of the Dayton com
pany^ wil^x two big Beltrami pota
toes. On Friday Mr. Burke received
the following letter which is self
explanatory:
Mr T. J. Burke,
^JPres. of Commercial club, 5
^Bemidji, Minn. j
My Dear Mr. Burke: I S
The call our Minneapolis people
made on the good people of Bemidji
last June has been a pleasant mem
ory. You willv
recall you very gra-
ciously presented me with two fine
potatoes. I brought them home and
put one in a glass jar in alcohol
the other I cut into pieces and plant
ed June 22. The crop fro mthat
one was twenty-two potatoes, part of
which were baked for last Sunday's
dinner and balance cooked in cream
for last night's dinner. The taste of
the new potatoes was as delightful
as the memory of your kindness has
been pleasant.
I hope everything about Bemidji
will be as productive as this one po
tato was and that the measure- of
your future prosperity may be" as
twenty-two to one.
Respectfully, &
George D. Daytoou
1
Beltrami- county potatoes won the
highest honors at the last state fah
and as fast as people are being in
troduced to them, their quality is
making them famous. s^
GYMNASTICS FOB GIRLS,
A class of girls has been formed in
the Bemidji high school to practice
gymnastics. Miss Sherwood has been
appointed instructor and has already
ordered a gymnasium equipment.
The girls will practice in the gym
nasium as
the sewing room wb|eh
Blackduck Friday has-been located in the gym has been
moved into the rooms formerly ^c-
cupied by the first grade. The grade
students nave been moved to the cen
tral building.
By-"HOP'
-T s eft
*TEN CENTS PER #Hfc?
fWILS0N3ESCA^
DEAlM|Kp|lY
Suffered Severe Scalp Wound When
Head Hit Iron Bar On Auto-
~L mobile Sunday Mdnunjj?
(By United Press).
Princeton, N No\ 4.Oir'the
very eve of the general election, Gov
ernor Wilson, Democratic candidate
for the presidency, had an escape
from death as narrow as that of
Roosevelt at Milwaukee. The gov
ernor is today wearing a bald spot
and several inches of surgical plaster
over a scalp wound which might eas
ily have been a fractured skull. He
was injured while driving in his
automobile Sundaj. The car hit a
mound in the road and he was bounc
ed against the iron bar which sup
ports the top. As Roosevelt was sav
ed by a bundle of manuscript," so
Wilson was saved by a heavy cap
which broke the force of the blow.
Today, however, he is back on the
firing line telling New Jerseyites
how to make their ballots tomorrow.
Election Facts In Bemidji^
Polls will be open from 6 a. ia. to
9 P- m. ^t^
First wardPolling place Miller's
store JudgesGeorge Kirk, F. S.
Arnold and one to be appointed.
'ClerksJ. J. Conger and J. P. Rid
dell.
Second wardPolling place -city
fire hall JudgesD C. Smyth, J. C.
Essler, J. Fenton ClerksT. C.
Bailey, A Wilson
Third ward Polling place Di
caire's store Judges^P. M. Di
caire, Gharles Wmtersteen, J. M.
Phillipi. ClerksC B. Hoyt, George
Canterbury
Fourth wardPolling place Star
taeatre. JudgesH E Anderson,
L. Wright, John Croon ClerksB
A Garrow, A Merrill
On the e\e of the 1912 general
election, predictions from all over
tue country point to the election of
Woodrow Wilson as the next presi
dent of the United States. Many be
lieve that the election will go to the
house but point cut that the house
is Democratic now and probably will
remain so.
Two tables were issued by the New
York Sun today The first is based
on a conservative estimate of the
Wilson strength and gives the New
Jersey governor 303, Taft 146, and
Roosevelt 82 Minnesota's twelve
are put in the Taft column in this
table. The second table is based on
the most optimistic forecasts, of the
Democrats and gives Wilson 355*,
Taft 136 and Roosevelt 40 Minne
sota is also placed in the Taft col
umn in this table.
Men who have returned from the
twin cities within past day or two
say that it is a mistake to put Min
nesota in the Taft column They say
that it will go for Wilson by a big
vote. At the theatres in Minneapo
lis the people have been showing
their political drift by applauding
for their candidate as the pictures
are thrown on the screen It is said
that Wilson is the popular candidate
Straw votes taken in Beltrami
county, especially the -city of Bemid
ji, Blackduck and several outlying
towns give Wilson a treble plurality
over either Roosevelt or Taft^ an/l a
clean majority of all Votes cast.' *lt
is* said that Wilson is especially
strong with the farmers who have
not forgotten the reciprocity agree
ment, Ballinger incident and other
errors of the Republican party and
who believe a third party, is unnet-
essary.*,^ I"9}
Should the electoral college fail to
name a president and vice-president,
the elections will 'go '*to _Tthe
house and to the senate.^ In the
house it will be necessary forJJae
candidate to receive a majority of
all the states, each state haying one
vote.,* At this election, two^ir4s
of the states must be represented rby^
one or more members far order "to
have a quorum. In case the house*
(Oonttnoeff on last PM).
3
ELECTION IS PREDICTED
Figures Issued By New York Sun
Give Him Majority On Oon
servative Estimates.
#H
.1*1
MINNESOTA NOT INCLUDED
Easterners Place Gophers On Taft
Taft List But Local Men Say
Democrats Will Win.
*%"S
Hf^a4i
J%

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