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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, November 05, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-11-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 163.
Have Been Offered $125 for Each
100 New Ones Turned In Paid
For In Advance.
PREMIUMS FOR SUBSCRIBERS
Dictionaries and Silverware Will Be
Given to Readers As Addi
tional Values.
FOR A BIG CIRCULATION
Bemidji's Daily Paper to Be In
Every Home Before Campaign
Ends At Christmas.
The launching of a circulation pro
ject, that is far greater than any
thing ever undertaken in this sec
tion of the country ,has been begun
by the Pioneer, through the co-oper
ation of the ladies societies of the
various churches in the city of Be
midji. In order that the reading
public may be familiar with this
manner of securing circulation, the
following statement of explanation
is deemed necessary.
The Pioneer has agreed to make a
gift of $125.00 cash to each of the
various ladies' aid societies for the
securing of each set of 100 yearly
subscriptions to the Daily Pioneer
'before Christmas time. In case any
club does not reach the 100 mark,
$1.00 for each yearly subscription
secured will be given to such club.
Present subscribers of the paper are
given the privilege of helping their
respective church societies by paying
one year in advance, for which the
club will be given the same ratio.
(Cpnttsnaa on last page).
BEMIDJI CHURCH WOMEN TO WORK
FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS TO THE PIONEER
viz: $1.00 for each_j:ear paid in-j^rj^i^an_de,--Everythi ng Trat the
vance. No commission will be paid
on arrearages collected. Should the
subscriber wish to subscribe for a
period of six months, and should the
old subscriber wish to make an ad
vance payment, for a period of six
months, a credit of fifty cents will be
given to each club for each subscrip
tion so secured.
The presidents of the various so
cieties have submitted names of their
respective members, and actual work
is now in progress. The members
are getting busy securing promises
from the various church members
and friends of the church, as well as
their own friends. They already re
alize .what a great opportunity this
subscription plan gives to the church.
Many have longed for a chance to do
something whereby the church might
receive financial aid. Many have
asked themselves the question,
'"What can I do to be of more than
attentive service to my church
The time for this opportunity is
right now. Every church in Be
midji can benefit by this offer. It
does not take work or strenuous labor
to accomplish big results. All that
is necessary is organization,
fected organization. Team work.
Let every individual member do his
or her part and the result is bound
to be surprising. Think of what it
would mean if every member turned
in his or her own subscription, new
or renewal, to the respective ladies
societies! Churches who have a mem
bership of but 100 will have already
reached their first gift of $125.00.
Churches who have a membership of
200' will have double this amount.
But it is not necessary to stop at this.
Every church and every ladies' so
ciety has among its membership a
certain number of hustling subscrip
tion getters. Some will secure three
or four or five subscriptions, among
friends, while others will make a
thorough canvass of their respective
neighborhood, and then again there
will be some who will endeavor to
cover the city, while others will
send to the surrounding towns, ask
ing them to help their church.
In addition to this offer to the
ladies' aid societies, the Pioneer has
decided to make a gift to every sub
scriber. With a year's subscription
paid in advance, the subscriber is
given his choice of any of the follow
ing premiums:
One Limp Leather Bound Dic
tionary $4.00
One Rogers' Silver Sugar Shell
and One Roger's Silver But
ter Knife 1.50
One Roger's Silver Berry Spoon 1.25
Six Roger's Silver Teaspoons. 1.25
With each six month's subscrip
tion to the Daily or yearly subscrip
tion to the Weekly, paid in advance,
a choice of the following:
One Cloth Bound Modern Die
tfonary $2.00
FARM ON WHEELS
COMING SATURDAY
Soo Line Special Will Be Open In
Beznidji From 3 to 6 In
the Afternoon.
DEMONSTRATE BEST METHODS
Is Designed to Promote Development
of Agriculture, and Domestic
Science.
VISITORS TO FEEL AT HOME
Commercial Club To Meet Tonight to
Decide On Character of Their
Entertainment.
Plans for the entertainment of the
visitors will be discussed at the Com
mercial club meeting this evening.
The meeting will start at 8 p. m.
sharp.
Minneapolis, Nov. 5.Demonstrat
ing the best methods of farm prac
tice adapted to the sections of Min
nesota reached and to promote the
development of agriculture and do
mestic science in rural districts the
agricultural special train, composed
of eleven cars bearing an ideal farm,
will begin a thirteen days' trip
through northern Minnesota, leaving
Minneapolis tomorrow, visiting forty
Soo line towns and making demon
strations to the farmers of what good
actual acres and the farm. buiWings
will be taken along. Beef and dairy
cows, sheep, calves, pigs, horses and
chickens will travel in company with
a staff of lecturers from the college,
which will include four women con
nected with the extension depart
ment of home economics and domes
tic science. The first stop will be
made at Brooten at 9 a. m., where
the train will remain for three hours.
The plan was worked out by Dean
A. F. Woods of the agricultural col
lege and Presdient George E. Vinc
ent and members of the agricultural
department of the Soo railroad. Pro
fessors A. D. Wilson, Andrew Boss
and C. P. Bull and N. C. Chapman,
state poultry expert, will be with the
train during its entire trip and Dean
Woods and President Vincent will
spend several days on the road. The
train will be on exhibit during this
afternoon at the Fifth street N sta
tion, where all interested in agri
culture are invited to visit the ex
hibits.
Schedule of Trip.
The following is the schedule by
Per- days, the first town each day to be
visited from 9 to 11 a. m., the sec
ond from 12 to 2 p. m, and the third
from 3 to 5 p. m.
Nov. 6Brooten, New Munich and
Bowlus.
Nov. 7Pierze. Onamia and Wau
kon.
Nov. 8Moose Lake, Lawler and
McGregor.
Nov. 9Remer, Cass Lake and Be
midji.
Nov. 11 Clearbrook, Oonvick,
Gully and Oklee.
Nov. 12Olso, Alvarado and War
ren.
Nov. 13Radium, Viking and
Thief River Falls.
Nov. 14Orleans, Lancaster and
Bronson.
Nov. 15 Karlstad, Strandquist
and New Folden.
Nov. 16Plummer, Brooks and
Detroit.
(Continued on last page).
SCOOP
THE CUB
REPORTER
THfiT POOR. H^M- HE-
ACTS LIKE. ME_ WAS
S A TRANCE-
MRS. W. C. KLEIN BURIED
Laid to Rest In Greenwood Cemetery,
After Funeral Service Held In
Her Home.
LEAVES A GIRL AND A BOY
In the presence of her relatives
and many friends, the funeral serv
ice of Mrs. W. C. Klein was read at
2 p. m. this afternoon by Reverends
White and Randahl. The body was
taken to Greenwood cemetery where
it was buried.
During the services, a quartette
composed of the Messrs. C. W. War
field, Andrew Rood, John Lucas and
C. J. Woodmansee sang "Jesus, Lover
of My Soul" and "Nearer My God,
to Thee." Mrs. Berggren sang "Face
to Face," which was one of Mrs.
Klein's favorite hymns. The follow
ing friends acted as pallbearers: W.
N. Bowser, R. H. Schumaker, J. P.
Riddell, Dr. Stanton, George French
and Earl Barker.
Mr. and Mrs. Klein have been Be
midji residents for about twelve
years, coming when the city was but
a hamlet in the wilderness. Mrs.
Klein leaves a husband and two chil-
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 5, 1912.
WHO WILL OWN THE CHICKEN TOMORROW?
fl Inside Information is
the costly, valuable in
gredient that figures
most prominently in all
business deals.
There is a wealth of
"Inside Information" in
the want ads.
fJMany business men
whose preeminent suc
cess is attributed to a
highly developed fore
sight and shrewdness,
are in reality making
daily use of this want ad
Information. cInside
dren, a girl of ten and a boy of three.
Her tragic death has been the cause
of much sorrow to her friends and
her death claims one of Bemidji's
most popular women.
ADMITS KILLING GIRL
Thirty-six Hours of Silence On Part
of Jail Attendants Breaks
Conway's Nerve.
EXONERATES HIS WIFE
Chicago, Nov. 5. Broken by
thirty-six hours "self treatment," a
new form of "third degree," Charles
Cramer, a clown, whose stage name
is Conway, confessed to the police
yesterday afternoon that he killed
Sofia Singer, the Baltimore heiress,
who eloped with Wm. Worthen. The
silence of jail attendants, with no men
knowledge of why his wife screamed
yesterday during her confession, be-
gan telling on Cramer today. Finally
he broke down .crying, "take me
from this dark cell I'll tell all."
His story added new features to
his wife's confession Saturday. He
claimed that he struck down the
woman in self defense, when she at
tacked his wife with a Tazor after
al proposal to his wife,
ated his wife from all blame. Cramer
and the woman were formally ar
raigned on a murder charge.
Why, O Course, Scoop, That Was It! By "HOP
^&?$gm&?^:?^?m WT CENTS PER WEEK.
^B*yf*v A.'_
"fc-'ldsif6^
The first alarm was turned in at
the city hall at 7:55 but by the time
the firemen got to the scene smoke
was pouring from a dozen places and
it was'Impossible to locate any one
source of the blaze. The failure of
the department to get a quicker
alarm was due to the fact that Mr.
Lycan was unable to get central.
The department made a quick run.
Many of the regular roomers had
left the hotel but others were still in
bed or getting up. Ralph Lycan and
the bell boys called at all rooms and
left the doors open in order to be as
sured that no one was inside. So
quickly did the flames spread that
those who had inside rooms lost prac
tically everything they had while
those on the outside were able to
save some of their belongings before
the smoke drove them away.
Water Gives Out.
At 9:30 th water in pressure
tank waen&inee found to be low so that
fire
th
th
Du
wate wa
he rebuked her for making an immor- forenoon of an election day. One
He exoner- polling booth, that of the Fourth
ward, was moved because of the fire
but the judges had little to keep
them busy.
HOTEL DESTROYED BY FIRE WHICH
BROKE OUT EARLY THIS MORNING
Many Guests Caught In Bed and Forced to Flee in Scanty Attire as tte #J^ $
.Flames and Smoke Four Through the Halls and Into the Booms.
Routing Out Late Sleepers.
BUILDINGS AND FURNISHINGS ARE A COMPLETE LOSS
Only Outside Roomers Able to Save Any Personal Belongings As Bias*
Came Through Center Walls and Flues Soon After It Hid
Started in Laundry Chute.
PRESSURE WAS TOO LOW FOR EFFECTIVE WORK
Supply in Tank Gave Out at 10 a. m. and Engine Had to be Taken to
Lake Where it Pumped into the Mains.The
lfarV, pjjj^
With Homeless Teachers and Business Men.
Fire broke out in the Rex hotel at 7:45 this morning and in spite
of the best efforts of the firemen spread through -all parts of the building
and at noon the structure and contents were a total loss. The fire start-
ed at the bottom of the laundry chute. It is believed that some one care-
lessly threw a lighted match or cigarette stub down the chute and that it
set fire to the waste in th bottom. The biulding was built two years
ago by the Duluth Brewing and Malting company and was worth about
140,000. Contents were worth about $11,000 and were covered by $5,000
insurance. Few of the roomers had any fire insurance and many lost all
of their personal belongings. The hotel was operated by Lycan and com-
pany which leased the building and Ralph Lycan was resident manager.
It could not be learned at pfess time whether or not the hotel would be
rebuilt. The fire was discovered by Ella Kemstad, one of the chamber-
maids.
THE REX HOTEL.
was takethedown to
^dP^Ped water into the
lak
mains. With both the engine and
th
Warfiel
pump
work
fire_
wereasfurnishedaatswitonffaihlr.e
not
water
mucturned
needed Th
kept al after
wa
Tinnn anla nixuM
tim
.1
.fire noon anid at press. th.e. was_
SMALL VOTE OUT
Owing to the Rex hotel fire, the
vte cast in Bemidji by noonintoday smallest ever cast the
tn
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY.
3K^
far from out. At 11 a. m. the west
wall fell in and opened the center
of the blaze to the firemen's hose.
The south wall fell out at noon with
a roar heard across the lake.
Miss Ethel Murray and Miss Ethe
lyn Hall, two Bemidji teachers, were
at breakfast when the fire started.
Mrs. Murray was still in bed. The
ladies at once went to the hotel but
were too late to get out their trunks.
Ladders were raised to the Murray,
room on the second floor and the
Hall room on the third floor and
friends took out such clothing and
other articles as were in the room
and dressers. G. G. Winter had the
room next to Miss Hall but Jack
Hillabe was unable to get into the
room as the smoke was too dense.
Lost Sixteen Bucks.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Marcum got
all of their things out of their rooms
on the third floor but lost sixteen
ducks which they had put in the ice
box last night. The Marcums had
been hunting at Mud Lake and re
turned late last evening. Will Chi
chester, Lee La Baw, L. C. Griffith
and Morier Larry were able to save
the most of their things but some
shot left in the rooms exploded and
(Continued on last page).
WILL WILSON WIN?
Telegraphic Returns At 2 P. M. In
dicate a Heavy Tote and Demo
"cratic Landslide.
(By United Press.)
St. Paul, dated New York, Nov. 5.
Telegrams up to noon reporting
record breaking Democratic vote, car
rying out predictions land slide
everywhere in the United States,
were pouring into Democratic head
quarters today. National Committee
man Jones wired from New Mexico
that the newest state in the union
was rolling up a remarkable vote
for Wilson and he said that the New
Jersey governor would have a ma
jority over both Taft and Roosevelt.
William R. Wallace wired from
Salt Lake city, that Taft was lead
leading Roosevelt in Utah by two to
one and that the deflection from the
regular Republican vote would be
sufficient to give Wilson the, state by
small plurality. Similar nyeportaT
come from Ohio, Indiana, Mic*ig
(Conttened on last mn).
iW-
iff
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