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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, November 15, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-11-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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TELEPHONE CO. TO
PENSION EMPLOYES
Combined Corporations of Four
Companies Set Aside
$10,000,000.
SYSTEM HAS 175,000 EMPLOYEES
Distribution of Moneys Covers
Accident, Sickness, Death
and Pension.
INTEREST BEMIDJI EMPLOYEES
Plan is Largest of Its Kind Ever
Undertaken in United
States.
Theodore N. Vail, president of the
American Telephone and Telegraph
company has announced a plan for
employees' pensions, disability bene
fits and insurance which will go into
effect the first of next January. This
plan is probably the most comprehen
sive of its kind ever undertaken in
the United States, not barring the
steel trust.
The people benefited are the em
ployees of the American Telephone
and Telegraph company, and Asso
ciated Bell companies
ican Telephone and Telegraph com
pany and Associated Bell companies,
the Western Union Telegraph com
pany and the Western Electric com
pany.
The plan for the distribution of
this fund has been characterized as
the most liberal, comprehensive and I
ideal ever inaugurated President
N. Vail has provided combined bene- i 7
fits for superannuation sickness, ac
cident and death, for an industrial
army more than twice as large as
the standing army of the Unitea
States
This provision is made entirely at
the expense of the various companies
interested, without contributions of
any kind from the employees them
selves The application of these vari
ed benefits will be strictly democrat
ic and will be for the benefit of all
employees of every rank. The plan
will provide for free change of em
ployment from one company to an
other, with full credit for combined
terms of service.
More than 7,000 employees of the
Northwestern Telephone Exchange
company, the Iowa Telephone com
pany and the Nebraska Telephone
company, three Bell companies now
operating as a working unit throug
out Minnesota, the Dakotas, Iowa and
Nebraska will be affected by this
plan. The pension benefit is retro
active, affecting employees now work
ing for all Bell companies.
The Bell system and associated in
terests provide employment for about
175,000 people of this number 130,-
000 are employees of the Bell tele
phone system. The total yearly pay
for the whole group is about $115,-
000,000, something over $80,000,000
being paid out In wages by the Bell
telephone system alone.
The terms by which provision is
made for the needs of age, illness,
accidents and deaths, may be sum
marized as follows:
Pensions
Male employees who nave reached
Continue on last page).
GET BADGER'S GOAT
Minneapolis, Nov. 15.Minnesota
got Wisconsin's goat today. Minne
sota may do it again tomorrow, and
then again it may not, but there was
no question about todays perform
ance. The Badge "Nanny" was tak
en into camp. Decorated with the
colors of the University of Wiscon
sin, the goat, a large black and white
one, had been tethered to a stake on
the campus of the University of Min
nesota and carefully shrouded with a
tent of canvas. Two thousand stu
dents, headed by the band, marched
to the spot today, and with fitting
ceremonies the goat was "unveiled"
and led away.
Dr. H. L. Williams wielded the
sword that knows no brother on
Northrop field last evening. Secrecy
at football pracitce has been most
pronounced all season and this week
the lines have been more closely
drawn than ever before. But the
last word in this respect was spoken
by the Gopher coach yesterday, when
he dro\e a dozen carpenters off the
field, refused admittance to several
former visitors and doubled the force
of student guards and cautioned
them to allow no one near the gates.
Ray Landis, of the Minneapolis gen- make a fair showing against Min--
eral office: jnesota.o If Minnesota wins and at
THE PLAN. I
A fund of $10,000,000 for pen
sions, sick benefits and life insur
ance will be available on January
CHICAGO STILL HOPEFUL
first, for the 175,000 employees of
the Bell system and associated inter
ests, and their families and depend
ents, amounting altogether to morejo|j w*i\n I A nrr Clllf
than a quarter of a million people SUE rUK LAKUfc jUJH
This $10,000,000 fund will be made
good from year to ea by annual ap'
propriations on the part of the Amer-
Chicago, Nov. 15With the end
of the conference football season a
week away, Saturday's game at Min
neapolis between the Unhersity of
Wisconsin and Minnesota is expect
ed to settle the conference champion
ship. If Wisconsin wins, the cham
the Western pionship will go to Madison. If
Union Telegraph company and the Minesota wins, the teams still will
Western Electric company. The Be- have Chicago to play on November
midji employees of these companies
are particularly interested in the
plan. Following is the outline of
the plan as furnished the Pioneer by
25, the last game of the season.
The University of Chicago coaches
and backers do not predict that the
Maroon team can hope to more than
crippled players Chica
i
cs
suc
go could defeat the team a week
from Saturday, the conference cham
pionship would be lost in triple tie,
with each of the leading teams hav
ing one defeat to its record.
I
New York, Nov. 15 A suit
against James B. Haggin, multi-mil
lionaire horseman of this
city,o
rmov ec Anaond
a
Hagsi
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 172. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, FFIDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 15, 1912.
was
filed late today in federails court by
District Attorney Wise to recover
$2,512,964.
It is alleged cordwood an othesr
amun
th
valu
th
governmend land
Montana, of
fro
tUnb ee
Co
Wa
S
tb Principal stock
is
tn
holder, between September 1883 and
I July 1895
POWERS TO AGREE
Paries, Nov. 15That the powers
have agreed definitely among them
selves what policy they shall adopt
in the future in the Balkans was
stated on semi-official authority here
today. No matter what the allies do,
it was stated, the powers will not
clash.
ASTOR GETS $65,000,000.
Arrives at his Twenty-first Birthday
And is Master of Fortune.
New York, Nov. 15.William Vin
cent Astor, head of the American
branch of the Astor family since the
death of his father, John Jacob As
tor, who went to his death on the
steamer Titanic on the morning of
April 15, 1912, reached his majority
today and by virtue of this fact came
into the full control of the Astor for
tune which is conservatively estima
ted at $65,000,000. When the estate
was appraised by experts shortly af
ter the death of Col.John Jacob Astor
to determine the amount of inheri
tance tax to be paid, the aggregate
value of the estate was placed at be
tween $75,000,000 and $80,000,000.
As these figures are official and pro
bably as nearly correct as possible
under ..he circumstances, the amount
of the fortune into the possession of
which young William Vincent Astor
came today, may easily be estimated.
(Copyright.)
TUNGSTON LAMPS DROP
May Reduce Cost of City Lighting
System in Residence
Section.
CITY NEEDS MORE GOOD LIGHTS
The fact that tungsten lamps have
taken a drop of forty per cent will
be of special interest to Bemidji, in
as much as it has at the present
time a large number of incandescent
lamps scattered about the city, which
in all probability will be replaced
by the tungsten.
Fifteen to 25 watt tungsten
lamps that formerly sold at 50 cents
now cost 30 cents at retail, 40 watt
lamps formerly 55 cents now retail
at 35 cents, 60 watt lamps, formerly
75 cents now 45 cents, 100 watt
lamps formerly $1.00 now 65 cents,
150 watt lamps formerly $1.50 now
$1.00.
Residents formerly burning the in
candscent lamps can now afford to
purchase tungsten lights, which
throw out more light and burn less
juice The use of this lamp is ad
vocated by the Warfield Electric
Light company of this city and they
are anxious to co-operate with the
citizens along the lines of installing
lights which will mean a saving to
every individual in the cost of ele
tric current.
It has many times been suggested
that the small incandescent lamps
on the numerous street corners be
replaced and in the face of this drop
in the cost of the tungsten lamp, it
it presumed that the light company
will replace these"little red lanterns"
with a bright shinning tungsten.
Some business men have suggested
that these lights be also lowered so
that the street will be more bene
fited. In addition to giving a better
light, less current will be consumed,
which should ultimately reduce the
cost per light to the city.
JURY FINDS ALLEN GUILTY
La Crosse, Wis., Nov. 15.After
being out two hours the jury called
on the case against Dr. Ralph C. Al
len, sharged with soliciting females
foor purposes of prostitution, return
ed a verdict of guilty. Sentence was
withheld until Saturday.
1-ROUND HOGAN KNOCKED OUT.
New York, Nov. 15.Leach Cross,
of this city, knocked out "One Round
Hogan," of California, in the third
round of a scheduled ten-round bout
tonight.
THE BEMIDJ I DAILY PIONEER
THE DEER SEASON IS ON
[Not a home in this
city but has its quota of
discardedfurniture, rugs,
stoves perhaps, a wheel
bariow maybe.
^Ajft few cents for a
want ad and some one
who needs the very
article that lies rotting
in your garret will call
and pay you for it.
You are better off
new owner is pleased
and the article itself is
contributing to the re
duction of the high cost
of living.
LOAN AGENTS ARE GUILTY
Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 15.J. L.
Leader of Cleveland and H. C. Miller
of Akron, both loan agents, peaded
guilty to bribing a legislator with
$100 and were fined $500 each. The
birbes were offered to influence votes
against an anti-loan bill.
FOOTBALL TO BASKETBALL
With the Grand Rapids football
contest last Saturday the high school
eleven disbanded. The season was
successful and the championship was
landed for the third time during a
period of four years, Crookston being
the victors last year. Basketball is
now taking up the spare time of the
school atheletes, and prospects look
encouraging. Several candidates are
after each of the positions, which in
sures a hot fight for each of them.
Coach Carson, who led the football
warriors to victory, will also have
charge of the basketball five.
GERMAN PROGRAM AT HIGH
This afternoon at two thirty the
Sophomore-Senior literary society
held a meeting. After the business
of the society had been attended a
German program was given. Miss
Murrary has been busy with the musi
cal part of the program and had pre
pared something special which was
in the nature of a surprise to the
students. The program, will appear
in Saturday's paper.
THE TURKEYS ARE HERE
Are Being Held For Safe Keeping by
the Pastor of the Presbyterian
Church.
TO BE SERVED AT MEN'S DINNER
Turkeys for the men's dinner,
which will be given Wednesday eve
ning in the Presbyterian church
have arrived and are pronounced by
Rev. S. E. P. White to be beauties,
having all the necessary require
ments, essential to a Thanksgiving
feast. "They are young, fine, fat and
juicy", said Reverend White" this
morning, "and owing to the scarcity
of this bird at this season of the
year, I'll tell no one where they are
being kept. I am the possessor of a
five shooter and an automatic high
power rifle, which I beleive will be
ample protection."
The dinner will be served by the
men of the church on this occasion,
and if one judges from their past
reputation. Reverend White will
have to look up additional turkeys
to feed the multitudes that may
assemble on this event.
THE GANG TESTIFIES
New York, Nov. 15..Stories of
the Gambler Rosenthal murder were
told by the three gunmen "Gyp the
Blood," Whitey" Lewis and "Lefty
Louie"today in the picturesque
langauge of the Bowery. The three
men told almost identical stories of
the murder, accusing "Bridgie" Web
ber, Harry Vallen and the mysterious
stranger of firing the shots that kill
ed Rosenthal. Themselves they pic
tured as innocent bystanders, lured
to the spot by "Bald" Jack Rose.
"Dago Frank", the fourth gun
man, all testified, was not on the
scene at all. Frank will have a
chance to tell his story today.
NEW TESTIMONY TUESDAY
Washington, Nov. 15. Taking of
testimony in the government suit for
dissolving the United States Steel cor
poration will be resumed here next
Tuesday. CARL MORRIS BACH IN THE RING
Shrevesport, La., Nov. 15.Carl
Morries, the Oklahoma "white hope",
is to be seen in the ring here to
morrow night at a boxing show to be
given under the auspices of a local
atheletic club. His opponent will be
Cass Tarver, a big fellow hailing
from Texas. The two are scheduled
for a ten-round contest.
WNNES0TA 1
HISTORICAL]
SSC1ETY,
TEN CENTS PER WEEK.
ISLAND LAKE BAR
TENDER SENTENCED
Draws One Year and One Day OL
Federal Prison at Fort Leav
enworth.
PATS $100 ADDITIONAL FIBS.
Judge H. A. Simmons Called As WiU
ness in Case to Indentify
Bottles.
HEARING WAS HELD LAST MAT
Was Bound Over to Federal Term.
of Court At Fergus
Falls.
H. A. Simons, judge of the moat
cipal court of this city returned from
Fergus Falls, where he was called on
legal business and where he also act
ed as a witness in the case of the
United States versus Ed. Collins the
Island Lake bartender, who was ac
cused of selling liquor to certain Red
Lake Indians some time last April.
At the hearing in May before Uni
ted States court commissioner H. A.
Simons, Collins was bound over to
the Federal Grand jury which met in
Fergus Falls this week. He was
tried in Judge Morris' court on the
charge of selling liquor to the follow
ing persons, said to be of Indian
blood John Summer, aged sixteen,
Clifford Sitting, age eighteen and
Ben Lawrence age twenty.
"The fact that the men were all
under age in addition to the faet that
they were of Indian blood and resi
dents of the Red Lake Indian reser
vation was convincing enough evi
dence to convict any person," said
Mr. Simons this morning in speak
ing of the trial.
Collins was found guilty and was
sentenced to the Federal prison at
Fort Leavenworth for a period of- one
year and one day and given a fine of
$100. Testimony during the trial
brought out the belief that there
were not enough people in the vil
lage of Island Lake to profitably sup
port a saloon, without it derived an
income from some outside source.
The court impressed the fact upon
the defendant that all will be seri
ously dealt with who sell liquor to
Indians wether they are of age or
not.
Some of the civil cases and also the
White Earth conspiracy cases were
continued o\er to the next term of
court. It is expected that all other
business will be cleaned up tonight
at which time the court will be ad
journed. SMALL CROWD HEARS CONCERT
First of Winter's Series Was Held ift
City Hall Last Night.
The Bemidji Band gave the first
of, a series of conserts at the city
hall last evening. Although the
crowd was small it was enthusiastic,
and accorded the band repeated eft
cores. Efforts will be made in the
future to secure a larger attendance,
as it is believed that the citizens of
Bemidji appreciate good band music
H. MATERS BUYS DAIRY LUNCH.
Took Possession of Old Armstrong
Stand Yesterday at Noon.
A deal was consumated yesterday
whereby Harry H. Mayers became
owner of Abell's Dairy Lunch Room
on Beltrami avenue, who will con
tinue the business along practically
the same lines as it was conducted
in the past.
Mr. Mayers enjoys an unusually
wide acquaintance in Bemidji and
this section of the state, and accord
ing to his friends, should meet with
success in his new venture.
Mr. Abell will leave for parts in
Canada, Monday, where he will look
over the field for a location in the
restaurant business.

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