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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, November 18, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-11-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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SS5?S
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 174.
WOMEN & CHILDREN
HUSTLING NEWSUBS
Begins Active Campaigning For
Handsome Christmas
Gift.
SUNDAY SCHOOLS FALL IN LINE
Men Not to be Barred From Enter*
ing Field of Active
Workers.
DON'T HOLD BACK SUBSCRIBERS
Send in All Names As Soon As
They are Received
By You.
The ladies of the various churches
who are interested in the Christmas
Gift Subscription campaign conduct
ed by the Pioneer will be pleased to
learn that daily subscripers are com
ing to this office and making advance
payments and new ones are having
their names entered as regular sub
scribers. What will interest them
more is the fact that many are ask
ing that certain societies be given
the one dollar cash gift.
All subscriptions should be sent in
as fast as they are secured. Some
have taken subscriptions and are
planning to hold them until they
have secured a number. If you have
any names to turn in do so at once.
If you cannot conveniently come to
the Pioneer office, telephone us the
name and the paper will be started
to their address immediately. Just
state that you will be in later to
make the required payment and se
cure the proper credit.
A strict^j^3or. ._J3 kejpt,^ by the
campaign department and all credfts
will be carefully made. Any sub
scriber coming direct to this office
stating that he wishes a certain
church society to receive credit, it
will be so recorded.
Rember that each society will re
ceive a dollar for every new name
turned in and when any society has
turned in one hundred yearly pay
ments, old or new, (not arrearages)
it will receive an additional gift of
$25.00, making a total of $125 for
the hundred.
If any society wishes to send in
new workers whose names do not
appear in the display announcement,
they may do so at any time up to
the close of the campaign. New
namps will help materially in the
securing of additional subscriptions.
Kach pearson has her friends and is
able to secure subscriptions where
others may not.
No, men are not barred from enter
ing this field. They are elligable as
woll as women. Get all you can to
help your club. If it is possible to
secure your entire church congrega
tion, do so. If you can secure out
siders to enter the field it is to your
advantage. Nobody is barred. The
more workers you get for your
church, the more hansome will be
your Christmas gift. In some of the
churches the Sunday school is taking
an active hand. These are the real
live hustlers. Organize your classes
and urge them to get busy. If the
Sunday schools of the various
churches wish to enter the field for
their church it may do so as a seper
ate organization. If the Young Peo
ples Societies wish to enter they are
cordially invited to begin at any
time.
Every church in Bemidji should
be able to earn a Christmas gift of
from $125 to $500.
Yes, even the business men of this
city are interested in the work. It
is their desire that every home in
Bemidji secure the Pioneer. It is to
their advantage. Each week the
Pioneers contains news from the var
ious stores and the are anxious that
you read what they have to say.
Their news not only will be of inter
est as news, but will be of interest
to your pocket book. They continu
ally offer merchandise at a great sav
ing, and if each home in Bemidji
would follow closely the special of
fers made by the Bemidji merchants,
and take advantage of them, it
would materially reduce the cost of
living.
Read about the special premiums
given to every subscriber, old or
new. They are gifts well worth
while. The silverware is strictly
guaranteed by the Barker Drug and
Jewelry store of this city, where it
is purchased. Anyone wishing de
tailed information on any of the
premiums may receive it either at
Historial Sodei^|
THE BEMIDJI
HARRY POLLOK.
Rosenthal Witness Arrested
Preparing to Leave For Europe.
Photo by American Press Association.
this office or at the Barker store
where it is on display.
MOON TO DEMAND RE-COUNT
Will Make Application to Court
Within Time Limit.
Charles Moon, unsuccessful candi
date for relection for Register of
Deeds of Beltrami county, stated to
day that it was his intention to
make application for a recount. He
has ten days in which to file notice.
He is of the opinion that in as much
as the Board of Canvassers have
found errors in his favor, that a re
count may possibly result in his elec
tion. The cost of a recount, accord
ing to Mr. Moon, falls on the should
ers of the man who applies for it,
unless the result is changed.
INSURGENTS LOOK FOR VICTORY
Hastings, Neb., Nov. 18.A suit
brought by the Nebraska "insur
gents" of the Modern Woodmen of
-4.
America,: who seek to prevent-the
head officers of the fraternity from
putting into effect the increased
rates agreed upon at the Chicago
meeting last spring, came up for
hearing before Judge Dungan here
today. The members who are back
of the suit have found much encour
agement in the recent decision of
Judge Bradshaw at Des Moines, in
which he denied the proposed in
crease in the rates of the fraternal
insurance society. The Nebraska
suit is to be conducted by the same
attorneys and on the same lines of
evidence as the Iowa case.
FINISH COUNTING BALLOTS
The Board of Canvassers have fin
hed their work of making an offi
cial report of the election held No
vember 5. Tne nnal count gives the
winners as previously announced in
the Pioneer. The close race between
Harris and Moon gives Harris a lead
of five votes.
MRS. STELLA WHITNEY CALLED
Mrs. Stella Whitney died Sunday
evening, after a long illness, at the
age of thirty-two. The funeral ser
vices will be held at the house this
afternoon at a: 30. Rev. Charles
Plesher officiating. The remains will
be taken to Clearwater on the night
train, for burial. Mrs. Whitney
leaves a husband and two children,
a boy, Summer, age ten and a girl,
Altha, age four, to mourn her loss.
HORNET.
Miss Nellie Shaw visited at her
home Saturday and Sunday and re
turned to Blackduck Monday morn
ing.
Mrs. Herman Thorns and children,
and Mrs. Frank Cossentine have re
turned from-visiting relatives at
Eagle Bend and St. Hilaire.
Roy Cossentine went to Bemidji
on Friday.
Miss Anna Anvid visited friends
in Blackduck on Saturday.
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WHEN SOT A CHMJD AND SINCS.1
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WOMAN HELDFOR MURDER
Mrs. Lean Musse is the Seventh Wo
man Held for Murder in the
Past 12 Months.
SAYS SHOT IN SELF DEFENSE
Chicago, 111., Nov. 18.For the
seventh time within twelve months
a woman is to be arraigned in Chi
cago courts tomororw to stand- trial
on a charge of first degree murder,
The woman is Mrs. Lena Musse and
the indictment charges her with the
murder of her husband. She has
been in jail the past six months and
at no time has she apepared in the
least apprehensive concerning her
possible fate. Not unlikely her con
fidence in the future is based on the
fact that of the six women tried on
murder charges in Chicago recently
four were given their freedom and
the other two sentenced to prison
terms
Peter Musse was shot and killed
in his home on the second floor of a
Larrabee street tenement house on
the night of April 28 last. A fire
followed the shooting and the body
was burned. The police investiga
tion led to the arrest of the slain
man's wife, a blue eyed, fair skinned
little woman of twenty-four, who
known in the neighborhood as the
"Blonde Queen of Little Italy."
Mrs. Musse admitted having fired
the shot that ended her husband's
life. Fear of her ouw life, she said,
impeleld the act. She insisted she
loved the man whose life she took,
and she blamed his frenzied jealousy
for her own unhappfress and the
final tragedy.
The woman's story, as given out by
the police, was as follows:
"When my husband came home on
the night of the tragedy he at once
began to quarrel with me. He said
I did not love him, and he was very
angry with me. We quarreled un
til about 9 o'clock. He said he was
gojng^ to kill me. But at a o'clock
Ihe became quieter, and I thought
the trouble was over. My little girl
went to bed in the room next to that
in which I was with my husband.
At two o'clock in the morning my
husband awakened me by getting out
of bed. He took a razeor out of a
drawer and took it to bed with him,
holding it in his hand.
"He told me to get out of bed, as
he was going to cut my throat. Then
he opened the razor and started to
get out of bed. I saw the revolver
lying on a dresser in the room, and
I ran and picked it up. I held it
close to my husband and fired three
shots at him. Then I ran outside,
but returned to get my little girl.
I did not set fire to the bed. The
pistol must have done that."
MEN FACED FRAUD CHARGE
New York,-Nov. 18.Julian Haw
taorne, the well known author and
journalist, Josiah Quincy, former
mayor of Boston, and several others
associated with them in the so-called
Hawthorne mining interests in Can
ada, were brought into United States
District court today for trial. The
indictment on which they are to be
tried charges them with making
fraudulent use of the mails in dis
posing of mining stock. Investors
from many parts of the country have
been summoned to testify at the trial.
THIRD TRIAL OF BARTON MILLER
Washington, D. C, Nov. 18.The
case of J. Barton Miller, former sec
retary-treasurer of the defunct. First
Co-operative Building Association of
Georgetown, was called for trial for
the third time today in the criminal
court of the District of Columbia.
Miller is under indictment charging
the embezzlement of funds of the as
sociation and the destruction of the
books and records of the association
The alleged offenses are said to have
occurred in 1908. Two previous
trials haye resulted in convictions,
but on appeal the decisions have been
reversed.
SiK*!^^,-
BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 18, 1912.
(Copyright.)
G. A. R. MONUMENT HERE
t*
Is Being Erected in Greenwood
Cemetery Near Irvine Avenue
Today.
IS OF ST. CLOUD WHITE GRANITE
The Old Soldiers' monument for
which moneys have been raised in
various ways for the |past year ar
rived in Bemidji ove*Pthe: Soo^llne
last Thursday and contractors came
this morning from Thief River Falls
to place it in the Greenwood ceme
tery.
The monument was purchased
from the Thief River Falls company
through their local agent J. M. Ful
ler and is built from St. Cloud white
granite with a red granite base. It
is being erected today and final work
will be completed Tuesday.
The stone costs about $1300 and
is 24 feet high. The appropriations
were made by the members of the G.
A. R. and other citizens of Beltrami
county. It will be placed in the
southwest corner of the grounds near
Irvine avenue.
The monument bears the inscrip
tion, "In memory of the Veterans of
the Civil War, 1861-1865." The
corner stone will be placed tomorrow
and the local G. A. R. are making
plans to have placed underneath the
stone a deposit containing the his
tory of Bemidji, the names of the
givers toward the monument fund
and other matter pertaining to the
civil war veterans.
NORTHWEST LAND-STOCK SHOW
Portland, Ore., Nov. 18.The Pa
cific Northwest Land Products Show,
for which preparations have been
going forward for nearly a year was
opened her today and will be con
tinued through the week. A won
derful assortment of farm and or
chard products of the entire North
west is on displpay. Coincident with
the land show the Pacific Interna
tional Dairy and Stock Show is"neld
at the new stock. yards in North
Portland, with exhibits of dairy
cattle and dairy products from Utah,
Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Washing
ton, Oregon and British Columbia.
Mr. and Mrs. John Graham and
two children, Mable and Robert, re
turned to Bemidji this morning af
ter spending the last three days as
the guest of J. Detling, of Blackduck
duck.
SCOOP ST oS The Female O The Species Is More Deadly Than The Male By "HOP
NEAR THE END
Ne ed a little cash to
Enance that proposition?
A want ad may find
the fellow who has idle
cash which he would
be glad to invest.
fl[ It's worth trying.
HOME TALENT TLAT
Caste of Twenty Local Actors Are
Holding Rehearsals Every
Evening.
WILL SHOW TWO NIGHTS ONLY
The home talent play which is to
be staged at the Brinkman Family
theatre Friday and Saturday nights
of this week, has created consider
able interest among Bemidji citizens,
and some predict that two nights
"For Old Eli" will not give all an
opportunity to see the play. The
theatre will seat somewhat over 400
people and there will doubtless be
from 1400 to 1500 who wish to see
this performance.
The cast is being drilled under the
direction of Miss Marjory Knappen,
instructor of elocution at the high
school, and promises to far eclipse
anything of a home talent nature
ever staged in Bemidji. Miss Knap
pen is considered a most capable in
structor, and the talent with which
she has to work is far above the
average.
The play is being staged for the
purpose of wiping out the debt con
tracted in the issuing of the high
school annual, the "Chippewa".
There will be twenty people in the
cast and a drilled organization with
such capable material as Newman,
Nelson, Carson,, Simons, Riley and
others, say nothing about the femin
ine side should more than make
good. Bemidji theatre goers have
in the past shown that they prefer
to attend a home talent show in pre
ference to a traveling professional
organization.
The K. P. lodge will meet Tuesday
night, November 19, at the Elk's
hall.
PiaiSEEERll^
BOY FINDS DEAD MAN
Body That of A. P. Russell, Who
Was an Inmate of the City
Poor Farm.
CORONER PREPARES BODT
A man named A. P. Russell, who
has been at the city poor house for
the past three days, being treated for
peuemonia and. tremens was found
dead in the woods a short distance
back of the Bemidji mill Sunday
morning.
According to repoorts, Mr. Rus
sell left the poor house Friday eve
ning in his underwear during one of
his spells and from his appearance
came in contact with a barb wire
fence brush, sticks and stones. His
clothing was practically all torn off,
body and face were considerably
marked and iSB-atched and it is pre
sumed that he was in the act of fight
ing one of these tremendous battles
of delerium tremons which are
known to end in complete exhaus
tion or death.
His body was discovered by a small
Nymore boy who was out hunting.
The boy told his father what he saw
and the coroner was immediately no
tified. Coroner Ibertson left for the
scene and returned with the body
to his morgue, where it is being pre
pared for burial. He has no rela
tives or particular friends in this
vicin:ty.
A letter found on his person indi
cates that his home is.in Empey Hill,
Ontario. The letter was written to
him by his daughter last May, and
began, Dear Papa: signed Laura Rus
sell. Efforts are being made by Mr.
Ibertson to locate his relatives. If
word is not received the body will
propably be buried in Potters field.
He was about forty years of age.
CONVENTION OF MERCHANTS
St. Louis, Mo., Nov. 18.More
than 1000 retail merchants, repre
senting widely separated sections of
the country, have arrived in St.
Louis to attend the first annual con
vention of the National Federation
of Retail Merchants. The federation
which was organized at Chicago a
year ago, will meet at the Planters*
Hotel tomorrow and continue in ses
sion three days. Noted authorities
will discuss a wide variety of ques
tions of interest and importance to
the retail trade.
1
TEN CENTS PER WEEK.
WISCONSIN WINS
FROM MINNESOTA
Carry "Big 9" Banner Back to
Madison for
1912.
IS ONLY UNDEFEATED TEAM.
The Backfield Responsible for Vic
tory of Husky
Badgers.
GOPHERS MAKE A GOOD FIGHT
Final Result was 14 to 0 in Favor
of Coach Juneau's Study
Men.
Wisconsin defeated Minnesota, 14
to 0, in the deciding game of the
Big Nine conference season of 1912
at Northrop field Saturday after
noon. The defeat of the Gophers was
decisive and came after one of the
most fiercely fought contests of the
season in the west. The score is in
one way something of an injustice
to Minnesota in that it does not
truly reflect the relative abilities of
the teams. The margin is much
closer than the score would indicate.
Wisconsin rose to its highest power
in the second period and scored two
touchdowns. In the second half of
the game the ground-gaining honors
were with the Gophers, but Wiscon
sin's spirited defense and the final
whistle ended what looked to be
march of the Minnesotans up the
field for a certain touchdown. Wia
consin appeared to be about all in
physically and seemed unable' to
withstand against this determined
attack of Minnesota. The final whis
tle only ended Minnesota's march
from her own 20-yard line to Wis
consin's 9-yard line, where the game
ended with the ball in Minnesota's
possession and a touchdown impend
ing.
Badgers a Fine Team.
Coach Juneau brought to Minne
sota the best team Wisconsin has had
in several years. It was a splendidly
balanced team. It's line was good.
It's backfield played a spectacular
plunging game. The Badgers had a
wealth of material and warmed two
full teams before the game started.
The odds of fortune appeared to fa
vor Wisconsin to a bountiful degree
this year and in addition to the ma
terial the men were well coached in
their style of play.
In the backfield Wisconsin had big"
men who by comparison of size and
weight dwarfed the Minnesota pony
backfield. These fellows were not
only big and powerful men, but were
fast on their feet and moved with
power and precision. Gillette, Tand
berg and Van Riper were the bright
est stars of the visiting backfield, al
though the Gophers were far more
fortunate in smothering Gillette than
they were in stopping the terrific
plunges of Tandberg and Van Riper.
These fellows are wonders at line
bucking and going to the tackle and
are the greatest opposing players
seen upon Northrop field in recent
years. The cadgers had two great
ends and one spectacular pestiferous
tackle in Butler. This fellow brought
more woe to the Minnesota attack
than any of the other Wisconsin for
wards. Bright was not called upon
as often as Tandberg and Van Riper,
but gave a good account of himself.
To show the relative strength of the
two teams, the following figures will
oe of interest:
f'N*
Wis. Minn
Ground Gained by Rushing 252 223
First Downs 10 15
Ground gained on forward
pass 12 .23
Ground lost on forward
pass 0 15
Ground lost on penalties 3 4
Fumbles 3 4
Number of punts 15 14
Average distance of punts 35 30
RETURN WITH TWO FINE BUCKS
Kelsey and Weinberner Back From
Beer Hunt with Prize Winners.
J. W. Kelsey and James Weinber
ner, of this city, returned this morn
ing from a deer hunt on the Wein
berner farm, northeast of Puposky
and brought back with them two
fine buck deer. These men are two
of Bemidji's old time hunters and
nave gone ont hunting together each
year for several years past.
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