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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, November 19, 1912, Image 1

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BUB'SBSFS"'" JS?
i
REGISTE CASE UP
I N DISTRICT COUR
Thirty Defendants Must Answer
Charges of Conspiracy to
form Monopoly.
SEVEN AEE DAYTON RESIDENTS
Alleged Methods Are Enumerated In
Complaints Covering Last
Three Years.
BRANCH MANAGERS ALSO IN
Special Panel of Jurors Drawn for
Trial Held In Cincinnati
Today.
Cincinnati, O Nov 19 The pre-
diction that the case of the National
Cash Register company would be one
of the important anti-trust prosecu-
tion left en er for the Wilson adminis-
tration to push to a conclusion is not
likely to be fulfilled The case was
called in the United States District
Court here today, a special panel of
jurors has been drawn, and the indi-
cations are that the trial will pro-
ceed without delay
In point of magnitude of the prop
erty involved and the prominence of
some of the individual defendants the
case is one of the most important of
its kind ever pressed by the govern
ment. The defendants, thirty in num
ber, must answer to charges of con
spiracy to obstruct and monopolize
the cash register business, in viola
tion of the criminal provisions of the
Sherman anti-trust law. The indict
ments were returned by the Federal
grand jury sitting in this city last
February
The principal defendants named
the government bill are the follow
ing officers of the National Cash Reg
ister company President, John
Patterson, vice president, Edward A
Deeds, secretary, George Edgeter,
treasurer W Bippus, directors,
William Muzzey, William Pflom
and Alfred Thomas All are resi
dents of Dajton, Ohio, where the fac
tory and general offices of the com
pany are located In addition to those
named the defendants include more
than twentj officials and managers of
the branch sales department of the
company
The National Cash Register com
pany is alleged to have gained a mo
opolj of the business during the last
twenty years, the actual offense
charged in the indictment covering a
period of three jears The methods
alleged to hav been used to obtain
the monopoly charged are as fol
lows
Threatened suits for infringement
of patents to be brought to harass
competitors, not for valid legal rea
sons.
Selling imitations of competitors'
machines as '"knockers to prejudice
customers of business rivals
Tampering with employes of com
petitors
Organizing spurious competitive
companies
Seeking patents on inventions of
competitors
Buying up competitors or forcing
them out of business
Bribing employes of competitors
and employes of transportation, tele
phone and telegraph companies
ALLEN'S TO DIE FRIDAY
Richmond, Va Nov 19 Flo yd
Allen and his son Clark S Allen have
been refused a new trial and have
been condemned to die Friday, No
vember 22, for their part in the mur
ders in Hillside court room last
March
MASTEN VISITS BEMIDJI.
Harry Masten, who was formerly
leader of the Bemidji band came over
from Grand Forks, North Dakota this
noon and will spend several days
here on business. Mr Masten re
ports work progressing fine with the
Grand Forks band, of which he is
now leader.
ONE DEER FOB TWO.
J. C. Titus and son Edgar return
ed yesterday from a hunting trip
in the vicinity of Nebisa. J. C. Ti
tus brought back a large deer but
Edgar was unsuccessful.
JAMES CREELMAN.
New York City's Civil Service
Head, Wrtnsss In Graft Probe
1912, by American Press Association
BEMIDJI SLEEPE
MA MATERALIZ E
Committees of Business Men from Be
midji Called Upon N. P. Head
quarters.
That Bemidji should have a sleep
er to and from this city to the twin
cities for the patrons who get on
and off the tram here is self evident
According to reports there is hard
ly an evening when the sleeper as
it leaves this city is not taxed to
the convenient limit by patrons who
board the train here
Last Friday night there were be
tween thirty-five and forty people
crowded, into -the lone sleeper and
four-fifths of that number got on at
Bemidji Returning Saturday night
from sixteen to twenty got off at Be
midji and the sleeper went through
practical!} empty It would be a
great convenience if the Bemidji pa
trons could be sidetracked here and
permitted to sleep until daylight and
the evening board the sleeper at
nine or ten and retire
A committee of five Bemidji men
Messers Wedge, Stanton, Brooks,
Burke and White were given some
encouragement at the Northern Pa
cific offices Minneapolis last week
and other business men will take up
the matter by writing letters to
headquarters urging that Bemidji be
given better accomodations
O EXHIBI
A WATERLO O
The Waterloo Courier reports that
W Mackenzie of Bemidji, Min
nesota is looking over the field for
a suitable place to exhibit Northern
Minnesota fruits, grains, etc The
article is as follows
W Mackenzie, representing the
immigration department of the
Northern Minnesota Development as
sociation is Watrloo today to se
cure data to be used by the commis
sion on Nov 20, when it will meet
in Minneapolis to name two cities
Iowa wherein thev will establish ex
hibits Mr Mackenzie will look over
Waterloo, Cedar Rapids, Davenport,
and Des Moines before making his
report
The exhibit consists of fruit,
gram, etc and is used for advertis
ing a section of northern Minnesota,
composed of thirtv-two counties The
object of the association is to stem
the tide of emigration into districts
farther north and supplv a place in
Minnesota for the restless homeseek
ers from other states
SCOOP
THE CUB
REPORTER
NEW COSTUMES COMING
Home Talent Actors to Use Minne
apolis and Bemidji
Apparel.
PRICES ANNOUNCED LATER
Costumes that will be used for the
actors in the Home Talent play "For
Old Eli" to be staged at the Brink
man Family Theatre next Friday and
Saturday have been ordered. There
will be nothing left undone to make
the play a success from every angle.
The costumes for the ladies will
be furnished by the Berman Empori
um of this city and those for the
men will be sent in from Minneapo
lis The third act which features
the track athletes and the training
quarters the men will be attired in
track suits, running shoes and all
the necessary paraphanalia that goes
to make up a regular training camp.
Bemidji people are becoming anxi
ous about the coming event and some
are already speaking for seats, J$*$
Brinkman theatre will announce i
an early date sale of seats and the
price of admission.
Miss Marjorie Knappen reports
that the members of the caste are re
hearsing diligently and making rapid
progress toward putting on the fin
ishing touches.
DANE-ROBINSON
At noon Monday, the marriage of
Miss Grace Robinson, of Minneapolis,
and Harold J. Dane, of Bemidji, was
solemnized in the home of the bride,
Bishop Samuel Cook Edsall officiat
ing The bride was attended by her
sister, Miss Lois Robinson and the
groom by Raymond T. Berry of De
troit, Michigan John B. Robinson
gave his daughter away
To the first strains of the Lohen
grin wedding march played by Miss
Gladys Dane, the ribbon bearer came
downthe broad stairs audi made-an
aisle through which the party walked
to an improvised altar. Ribbons
were stretched by the Misses Marion
MacCallum and Sadie Boyson, sor
ority sisters of the bride, Leone Cory,
of Grand Forks, and Margaret Gran
dy, of Bathgate, N. D. Miss Mma
Johnson, of St Paul, sang several
solos before the ceremony.
As soon as the aisle was made,
Bishop Edsall took his place and
was followed in by the groom and
his best man Miss Lois Robinson
came in alone and the bride was met
at the foot of the stairs by he father.
Mrs Robinson and Mr. and Mrs.
Dane, parents of the groom, join
ed the party at the altar.
Following the ceremony, a wed
ding breakfast was served to the
guests Among the out of twon
guests were Mr. and Mrs. John Gro
gan, of Granville, N. D. Ellen eBrt
holf, of Stirum, N. D. Miss Leone
Cory, of Grand Forks Miss Margaret
Grandy, of Bathgate Mr. and Mrs.
W S Lycan, of Crookston, and Min
neapolis, and Raymond T. Berry, of
Detroit
DID NOT SEE THE GAME
F. A. Wilson and Walter Marcnm
Lose Out After Long Ride.
After facing the cold November
wind in an automobile for more than
half a day and most of one entire
chilly night, F. A Wilson and Wal
ter Marcum, found upon arriving in
Minneapolis last Saturday morning
that their trip had been made in
vain Tickets for the Minnesota
Wisconsin contest were at a premium
and the two Bemidji enthusiasts had
to satisfy themselves by watching
the crowds battle for their admission
from the seats of their machine, and
later by watching the man with the
'big voice" yell play after play from
a second story window of the Trib
une building They returned to Be
midji on the evening M. & I.
"*v
THE BEMIDJI PIONEE
VOLUME 1G. NUMBER 175. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 19, 1912. TEN CENTS PER WEEK.
fr
SHANNON VISITS BEMIDJI
Represents the Society For the
Friendless with Headquarters
at Minneapolis.
SPOKE IN CHURCHES AND H. S.
Reverend W. A. Shannon arrived
in Bemidji Saturday from Minne
apolis and addressed meetings in the
Presbyterian, Me4&oaisj*- Swedish
Lutheran, Norwegian Lutheran
churches and the high school. He al
so visited the city jail. He spoke
chiefly of the work that is being
done "by the society among the pa
rolled prisoners, friendless girls and
boys and those who are out under
suspended sentences by the juvenile
courts.
The society was organized in this
state about four years ago and is
under the supervision of the nation
al society whose headquarters are at
Kansas City. Judge Waite of the
district court at Minneapolis is presi
dent of the state association and
Reverend James Parsons is superin
tendent.
BATH TUB TRUST ILLEGAL
Washington* Nov. 19. In an
epoch-making decision Monday in the
socalled "bath tub" trust case, the
court laid down the broad principle
that there can be no monopoly in
the unpatented product of a patented
machine without violating the Sher
man anti-trust law.
HOSPITAL ITEMS.
J. T. Gardener of Cass Lake is con
fined in St. Anthony's hospital with
typhoid fever.
Clarence Smith of Cass Lake was
accidentally shot through the hand
while hunting near Cass Lake. He
is being cared for in St. Anthony's
hospital.
Gus, Berg of Bemidji, is confined
in St. Anthony's hospital with a se
vere attack of pneumonia.
Carl Tallum of this city is con
fined in St. Anthony's hospital with
a severe attack of plural pneumonia.
Walter McDonald was taken to St.
Anthony's hospital yesterday as he
was suffering from blood poison in
his left leg. Mr. McDonald has been
working in the vicinity of Blac*
duck.
Scoop Thought A Steam Roller Had Hit Him
GOVERN YOURSELVES ACCORDINGLY
EARLY SHOPPIN
FO CHRISTMAS
Merchants Making Preparations For
Early Buying.Urge Public to
Select Now.
Bemidji merchants are again dem
onstrating to the people of this com
munity that they are right up with
the times, when it comes to early
display for the holiday trade. Even
the larger-city stores axe not.-ready
to talk Christmaar shopping'.
Carloads of holiday merchandise
has reached Bemidji several weeks
ago, and is now being placed in
readiness for the inspection of the
public- Say the merchants, "Come
and do your Christmas shopping
early. You get the very best of se
lection, the greatest variety from
which to choose and plenty of time
to choose it Don't wait until the
last day or two, but come now, de
liveries will be made when you want
them."
AUTOMOBILE HITS HORSE.
Knocks Horse Down and Throws
Man On Ground Stunned.
An automobile last Friday even
ing ran into a horse and buggy on
America avenue near Fourth street,
knocked the horse down and threw
the man to the street, knocking the
wind out of him. The occupants of
the car immediately rushed to the
injured man, but he was found to be
unharmed with the exception of hav
ing his wind knocked out. The horse
came out of it with a slight scratch
on the front knee.
This was not a case of careless
driving, but a matter of not seeing
the team. The auto had lights, but
in making the corner they were not
thrown directly in front of the direc
tion the car was going. There was
an electric light on the corner, but
as the driver put it. -'What light it
does throw don't reach the ground,
and if they were lowered and re
placed by a brighter light, this acci
dent would not have occurred."
RETURNS TO BEMIDJI.
A. P. White who was called to Ok
lahoma as a witness in a suit involv
ing land title, received a message at
Minneapolis, while enroute to that
state to the eect that the trial was
postponed for a week pending settle
ment He returned to Bemidji this
morning.
MOON GAINS ONE VOTE
Canvassing Board Completes Work
and Only Change Is In Harris'
MajorityWon by Five.
JOHNSON GETS HIGHEST TOTAL
With the work of the canvassing
board completed, the results remain
unchKaa^d.jrvrith the single excep-
tion that^flSm, SoeiaKst eandidale fitaosaa
for register of deeds, gained one vote
on his successful opponent J. O. Har-
ris, the present incumbent, the later
winning by the small majority of
five votes.
The only present county officer
who is not returned to office is George
French, treasurer, being defeated by
Earl Geil, who carried the county
with a majority of 214.
Andrew Johnson has the: honor of
receiving the largest majority for a
candidate, while in the county Judge
Stanton leads with more than 1,400
votes as a majority.
The majorities were as follows:
Johnson 614 George 374 Geil 214
Harris 5 Clark 552 Torrance 508
Ibertson 286 Stewart 419 Clement
son 28 Lennon 84 and Thompson 95.
GUNMEN FOUND GUILTY
The four gunmen charged with the
murder of Gambler Rosenthal were
found guilty of murder in the first
degree.
Gunmen heard themselves charac
terized by Assistant District Attor
ney Moss as "the hands which held
the instruments of death, and as
hands of a body which Rose, Webber
and Vallon were the brains and Lieu
tenant .Becker the will.
To Lay Corner Stone.
The corner stone of the G. A.
monument will be laid Wednesday
afternoon at 2 o'clock. All veterans
and ladies of the circle are invited
to attend. The dedication will be
held Memorial day.
It was first planned to erect the
monument Monday, but owing to de
lays the work was postponed. The
ladies of Circle, who were the most
active in the securing and planning
of raising funds for this noble work,
have planned a program, which will
be carried out tomorrow noon.
Bv "HOP
MINNESOTA
omcAt
GENERA REVIEW
DEMO LANDSLIDE
Claim a Lemd of Fifty Ont erf Hiaety
Biz Memben of the
Senate.
CARRY HOUSE BY 170 MAJORITY
Electoral College Gives Wflion 429
With Two States In
Doubt
19 DEMOCRATIC GOVERNORS
Popular Vote Shows Wilson to Lead
by More Than 2,000,000
Plurality.
In this election there were chosen a
president and vice president of the
United States, legislatures to choose
thirty-five members of the United
States senate, determining the politi
cal complexion of that body. 435 mem
bers of the national house of repre
sentatives, governors in more than
thirty states and thousands of minor
officials. In the electoral college the
Democrats hare so many votes that it
seems a shame to count them. The
senate is close, but the Democrats are
claiming at least fifty votes out of
ninety-six, with some states yet doubt
ful. The boose is Democratic by near
ly 170 majority, while the Democrats
have likewise chosen a majority of the
governors.
The New Senate.
Alabama Bankhead* (Dam.)
Arkansas Davis* (Don.)
Colorado Shafroth (Dem.)
Colorado {vacancy)..Thomas (Dem)
Delaware A Democrat
Georgia Bacon* (Dem.) i
Idaho Borah* (Rep.)
Idaho (vacancv). ....A Republic**
Illinois In doabt
niiaots (vacancy) In doabt
Iowa Kenyon (Sap.)
Thompson (DeraJ
Kentucky -James (DemJ
Louisiana Ransdell (Dem.)
Maine Burleigh (Rep.)
Massachusetts A Republican
Michigan Smith (Rep.)
Minnesota Nelson (Rep.)
Mississippi Tardaman* (Dem.)
Montana Walsh (Dem.)
Nebraska Norris (Prog.)
Nevada Pittman (Dem.)
New Hampshire A Republican
New Jerse\ .Hughes (Dem.)
North Carolina Simmons (Dem.)
New Mexico Fall* (Rep
Oklahoma Owen* (Dem.)
Oregon Lane (Dem.)
Rhode Island A Republican
South Carolina Tillman* (Dem.)
South Dakota Sterling (Rep.)
Tennessee A Democrat
Texas Sheppard (Dem.)
Virginia Martin* (Dem.)
West Virginia A Republican
Wyoming Warren (Rep.)
Those marked with a star have been
elected. As the Democrats have thir
ty holdover senators this would Indi
cate that they would have forty-nine,
or a majority of two, with a chance
still to win one in Illinois, where no
party has a majority in the legislature.
3P
fir
4
i
The New Governors.
Colorado Elias M. Amnions (Dem.)
Connecticut Simeon E. Baldwin (Dem.)
Delaware Charles R. Miller (Rep.)
Florida Park TrammeU (Dem.)
Idaho James H. Hawley (Dem.)
Illinois Edward F. Dunne (Dem.)
Indiana Samuel M. Ralston (Dem.)
Iowa George W. Clarke (Rep.)
Kansas In doubt
Massachusetts Eugene N. Foss (Dem.)
Michigan....Woodbridge N. Ferris (Dem.)
Minnesota Adolph O. Eberhart (Rep.)
Missouri Elliott W. Major (Dem.)
Montana Samuel V. Stewart (DeavJL
Nebraska John H. Morehead (Dem.)
New Hampshire a doubt
New York William Sulzer (Dem.)
North Carolina Locke Craig (Dem.)
North Dakota F. O. Heilstrom (Dem.)
Ohio James M. Cox (Dem.)
Rhode Island Aram J. Pothier (RepJ
South Carolina Cole L. Blease (Dem.)
South Dakota Frank Byrne (Rep.)
Tennessee Ben W. Hooper (Rep.)
Texas Oscar Colquitt (Dem.)
Utah John F. Tolton (Dem.)
Washington Ernest Lister (Dem.)
W. Virginia. .H. D. Hatfield (Rep. and Prog.)
Wisconsin F. E. McGovern (Rep.)
In New Hampshire the legislature
will choose the Republican candidate,
since no one had a majority in the elec
tion. In Kansas the fight is so close
between Capper (Pep.) and Hodges
(Dem.) that the official connt win be
required to decide. Capper claims it by
53 and Hodges by 50.
In Tennessee the result was very close
between McMillin (Dem.) and Hooper
(Rep.). In Delaware there was only
about 1,000 between Miller and Mon
agnan (Dem.).
The New Home.
Demo- Repub-
crats. Ucana.
....19
1 7 2 4
S 1 4
IS
1
Alabama
Arizona Arkansas California
Colorado
Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Idaho Illinois 1*
Indiana a
Iowa S
Kansas S
Kentucky S
Lomsiaaa S
Maim 1
Maryland
Massachusetts .-._ 1
Michigan Jsunpsflsfotsm Mississippi
Mlascmrl
Pro-
1 S
USSSSSSSTrnTSSSlT

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