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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, December 03, 1912, Image 1

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ARCHBALD TRIAL
STARTED TODAY
For the Ninth Time in the History of
the Country, a Federal Judge
Is Before the Senate.
BEING TRIED BY THE HOUSE
Is Charged With Attempting to Float
Coal Deals Through Kail
road Officials.
MORAL SENSE DEADENED
Report of Judiciary Committee Says
That He Has Used Office for
Personal Profit.
*.y United Press.
Washington, December 3.For
the ninth time in the history of the
United States, its most plenary pow
erimpeachment proceedingswas
exercised today by the senate.
Robert W. Archbald, associate
justice of the new commerce court,
was the defendant His impeach
ment trial began, with a committee
of seven representatives acting as
prosecutors.
'Misbehavior and misdemeanors"
in office were the formal charges
against Judge Archbald. The in
dictment, presented by the house
consists of thirteen articles, a most
scathing and bitter arraignment of
the federal judge
Use of his office for personal profit
is the substance of all of the charges
against the defendant He is charged
with attempting to float deals in
refuse coal deposits in Pennsylvania,
through railroad officials, and also
improper receipt of favors from at
torneys before his court
Sweeping denial of wrongdoing
was made by Judge Archbald to
every one of the thirteen charges
against him. He contends that no
improper motive can be predicted
from any of his acts, private or offi
cial, and that he never gained or
sought to profit by improper use of
his office.
When the senate met today it was
planned to devote from two to four
hours daily to taking testimony of
the 100 witnesses who will be called
for both the government and the de
fense. About seventy witnesses
were before the house judiciary com
mittee when the impeachment charge
was under investigation. At those
hearings Judge Archbald, by force
of precedents, could not and did not
submit any evidence or offer testi
mony of any witnesses. He did not
take the stand himself Whether he
will testify before the senate has not
been disclosed
The impeachment trial today was
the first held in the senate since
Judge Swayne, federal district judge
Florida, was tried and acquitted
in 1905
Ouster of Archbald will require
a vote of two-thirds of the senators,
although a majority only of the
house was required for his impeach
ment.
Complaint Last February.
Today's trial had its inception in
a complaint filed last February be
fore Interstate Commerce Commis
sioner Henry* Meyer, by William
P. Boland, president and general
manager of the Marian Coal com
pany of Scranton, Pa. Boland told
Meyer that he feared Archbald had
been or was interested in aiding cer
tain railroads Boland's litigation
with the carriers.
Commissioner Meyer reported Bo
land's complaint to Attorney General
Wickersham, who caused an investi
gation to be made by Wrisley Brown,
special assistant On the strength
of Brown's report. Attorney General
Wickersham reported the circum
stances to President Taft. On April
25, 1912, the president sent a spe
cial message to the house, laying all
of the evidence before the house for
its action. The house judiciary com
mittee, on May 7, began the investi
gation, concluded June 4, and on
July 8 recommended that Archbald
be impeached.
Moral Sense Deadened.
In its report the judiciary com
mittee said:
"Your committee is of the opin
ion that Judge Archbald's sense of
moral responsibility .has become
deadened. He haft prostituted his
high office for personal profit. He
has attempted by various transac
tions to commercialize his potential
ity as a judge. He has shown an
overweauing desire to make gainful
ifymttmua an last page):
HENRY MORGENTHAU.
Chairman Finance CammittM
of Wilson National Committee.
Vhoto by American Press Association.
TRUST IS OPPOSED
TO CONVICT LABOR
By United Press.
St Louis, Dec. 3. Michael S.
Lamb, former general agent of the
International Harvester company at
Sioux Falls, S. D., testified today that
in 1903, the International contrib
uted to a fund to defeat a bill intro
duced in the state legislature to em
ploy convict labor in making binder
twine
Lamb could not remember whether
the amount was $300 or $500.
The testimony was given when the
taking of evidence in the govern
ment suit to dissolve the Harvester
trust was resumed before. Special Ex
aminer, Robert S Taylor"
Lamb denied on cross-examination
by Edgar R. Bancroft, general coun
sel of the International, that the
money was intended to be used as a
bribe or used for services.
LARGEST ATTENDANCE
More People Saw Minnesota State
Fair Than Any Other Held In
the Middle West.
By United Press.
Chicago, Dec. 3 Minnesota had
the largest attendance of any of the
state fairs held in this section of the
country this fall. Nebraska ranked
fifth although the Nebraska fair was
held the same week.
The American Association of Fairs
and Expositions today adopted reso
lutions approMng the Maguire bill
which is to be presented to congress
at this session and which asks that
an appropriation of $100,000 be
granted for the erection of a building
on state fair grounds to be used for
agricultural and horticultural ex
hibits.
An effort by the Minnesota State
Fair association managers to have
the date for their fair changed failed
and the annual fair will be held the
first week in September the same
time as the Nebraska fair. The ef
fort to change the fair to a later
date was made principally to accom
odate Northern Minnesota.
ODD FELLOWS ELECT.
At a meeting of the local Odd
Fellows, held Friday evening the fol
lowing officers were elected for the
coming year Cobb, N G.
George Canterbury, Un
ruh, secretary, L. Given, treas
urer W. Stewart and Court
ney, trustees.
CWVXD THE CUB
OVjVA/r REPORTER
3CD0P-T CAMT HKLP
BUT*RUTCOO OP
Tb MAkt VOUTWft
EDITOR OF X6-
BTXSE. DtPAsrmsNr,
bo TOUR. *IIAS
^HaPWfr
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 186. BEMIDJ1, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 3, 1912.
MESSAGE
Of President Taft to Con
gress on Foreign Rela
tions Read Today
By United Press.
J*
34
FIRST ONE OF A SERIES
Advises Government Ownership of
Legation Buildings In Other
Countries.
Washington, Dec. 2.The success
of "dollar diplomacy" and appeal for
supplemental marine legislation to
make it more effective was the gist
of President Taft's message on for
eign relations, the first of a series of
messages which together will take
the place of the customary annual
message, read to congress today.
The president also dealt extensive
ly with the necessity of co-operation
between the state department and
congress in protecting the finances
of South and Central American re
publics and preventing revolutions
that endanger American capital and
lives.
Investigate Foreign Farms.
Discussing investigation of foreign
farm methods, the president declared
that lack of capital and sufficient
land working and land owning popu
lation are seriously hampering the
development of our agricultural
lands.
A solution of the matter was to
be found in the reports made by our
diplomatic representatives and sub
mitted to the congress of governors,
now meeting in Richmond, Va.f as
to rural credit plansv
The president advocated the imme
diate passage of the following meas
ures:
Government owned legation build
ings in all foreign countries.
Immediate laws designed to protect
finances of South and Central Amer
ican republics. In this connection
the president laid the blame for the
recent Nicaraguan revolution, which
required American intervention and
resulted in the death of seven Amer
ican marines and sailors on the sen
ate's failure to ratify the loan prop
osition.
Amendment of the maximum and
minimum tariff plank to provide
more effective means of meeting dis
crimination against American ex
ports.
To Protect Seal Herds.
Further legislation to protect and
increase the seal herds at Priblioff
islands, now protected for five years
under the seal treaty between the
United States, Great Britain, Japan
and Russia.
Passage of the anti-narcotic law,
defeated by congress after he had
advocated it in a special message,
along lines laid out by the Interna
tional Opium congress at The Hague.
Reviewing the falure of congress
to pass this law, the president said
it was a breach of faith with other
nations who participated in The
Hague conference.
Establishment of a merchant ma
rine and proper credit extensions to
Americans in foreign countries.
NATIONAL BANKS
RECEIVE A CALL
By United Press.
Washington, Dec. 3.The comp
troller of currency today issued a
call on all national banks for reports
of their condition at the close of
business November 26.
"AitDrrwi oit-me.
I DEMAND A MONTH*
U*\JW*V M ADVANCE
HE EDtTD* ABOVE.
^U-OTHER SHoou
DO HIS XMAS
r2^
**r~^ _
TO DIG WEUS AT ONCE
Contract Let Last Bight by the City
Council to A. F. McCarthy,
of Minneapolis.
MUST CLEAN ONE OLD WELL
At the regular meeting of the
council last evening, bids for the
-construction of a new twelve inch
well were opened' sfsiL a-pntracE Ie"E
to A. F. McCarthy of Minneapolis.
Mr. McCarthy was also ordered to
clean out the eight inch well which
has become clogged. If the new well
and the cleaned well do not furnish
enough water, it is understood that
he is going to dig a second new well.
The new wells will be deep wells.
He was placed under bonds of $2,000
to execute the contract.
Other bids were received from the
S. Swenson Artesian Well company
of St. Paul J. R. Griffith of Walker
and D. Haynes of Minneapolis, Mc
Carthy's bid was much lower than
the others and he was awarded the
work.
W. L. Meyers, who was burned out
in the Rex hotel fire, asked the coun
cil to transfer his license from the
Rex hotel building to the Stechman
building on Third street and his re
quest was granted. George Tanner
was granted a license for the coming
year. Bonds for Tanner and Meyers
were accepted and filed.
The usual amount of bills which
come in the first of the month were
checked over and ordered paid.
Sherm Bailey and L. F. Johnson were
absent from the meeting.
TO MOBILIZE NATIONAL
GUARDS AT ST. PAUL
By United Press.
Norfolk, Va., Dec. 3.The Asso
ciation of National Guardsmen met
here today. Captain Moseley of the
general staff of the army explained
the new mobilization scheme of the
department. It divides the country
into districts and the 13th would
have headquarters at St. Paul and
be composed of Wisconsin, Minneso
ta, Iowa, North and South Dakota.
If the plan were adopted it would
require provisions made for man
uevring and would enable a rapid
mobilization of the national guard
in case of war.
Scoop Wants To Set A Good Example
I N ADVANCE. ^jg^
MOM
BRIGHTEST SPOT OF All
i
TWENTY-TWO
DAYS TO
CHRISTMAS
*fe~-B-a:,ws
Bania is coming on the keen Jump.
Hark to bis drummingnimpy-tump-
tumpi
This is tne message he seeks to convey
Early! Shop Early!
Early I Today!
Shop
FOR WORK WITH BOYS
H. W. Mixsell. State Y. M. C. A. In
vestigator In City Looking: Over
Ground for An Association.
SENTIMENT FAVORABLE HERE
H. W Mixsell, assistant secretary
of the state Y. M. C. A. board, has
been in Bemidji for the past two days
investigating the nature of the work
being done here fos boys. He got in
touch with many of the leading men
of the city and said that he was sur
prised at the amount of sentiment he
found.
"I find that many who believe Be
midji should have a Y. M. C. A. be
lieve it necessary to have a building
at once. This is not the case as the
building should not come until a
strong leader is developed. The pri
mary purpose of such an association
is to provide a meeting place and
social activity for the young men of
the city. You already have a Com
mercial club, reading room, bowling
alley and small gymnasium and it
would not take much work to con
centrate them under one head
Mr Mixsell left at noon for Cass
Lake and will visit Walker, Park
Rapids and Wadena on his way in
to Minneapolis.
ite~ ^5^^~^^J,3^M-C^
FIRE CASES ARE STARTED
First One Called In District Court
Today and Work of Drawing
Jury Was Started.
ATTORNEYS WORKING NIGHTS
.The first of the 1910 fire cases of
settlers fn the Northern part of this
eountjgaj&|t the Canadian North
^efn~raiTroaa was "started before Judge
Stanton in district court this morn
ing. The case is that of Wilhelm
Zipple vs. the Canadian Northern
railroad. The time of the court to
day was occupied in the drawing of
a jury.
There are twenty-eight cases of
settlers against the Canadian North
ern railroad and the cases grew out
of a fire which swept through the
Zipple country in the summer of
1910. It is claimed by the settlers
that the fire was started through
the negligence of the railroad com
pany and they are endeavoring to
recover for property lost in the blaze.
It is believed that if Zipple is suc
cessful in his trial that each one of
the twenty-eight will demand a sep
arate trial.
The case of Martin C. Jennings
against A. T. Wheelock and the
Northern National Bank is being
tried evenings as it was not finished
before the fire cases were called and
Judge Stanton did not wish longer
delay. Jennings is asking for an ac
counting from Wheelock and the
bank on certain logging and sawing
contracts.
IMPORTANT MEETING
The regular monthly meeting of
the Bemidji Commercial club will be
held in the club rooms at 8 o'clock
tonight. Several important matters
are to be brought before the club for
consideration at this time.
ANNETTE TTRT.T.ERMAN WEDS.
Danbury, Conn Dec. 3.Miss An
nette Kellermann, the swimmer, was
married to her manager, James R.
Sullivan, by a justice of the peace
here on Tuesday last.
"HO
TEN CENTS PER WEEK.
MANY CHANGES ON
RED LAKE LINE
New Train Schedule to go Into Effect
December 16 But Shopping
Time Is Not Shortened.
TILLAGE OF NEBISH MOVED
Townsite Hat Been Laid Oat When
Whitefiih Jnnction Wat For
merry Located.
POSTOFFICE IS A MILE AWAY
Has Been Left In Old Railroad Depot
and Settlers Go Big frmrr
for Mail.
EFFECTIVE DECEMBER 15.
1:30 pm Lv.. .Bemidji. .Ar. am 9:4 6
2:35 Papotky 8:50
3:15 Nebith 8:10
3:50 Ar Redby Lr 7:80
On December 16, the Minneapolis,
Red Lake and Manitoba railroad will
put into effect the above-schedule for
its passenger service. At the present
time, the train arrives in Bemidji
about 10:30 a. m. and leaves at 3:35
p. m. Under the new schedule it
will arrive at 9:45 a. m. and will
leave at 1:30, giving practically the
same shopping time in Bemidji. The
new service will also enable Bemidji
business men to go to the ageney at
Red Lake in the afternoon and be
back in time for business in the
morning.
The Red Lake line has been mail
ing many changes during the tail.
Several thousands of dollars wore
spent in ballasting the roadbed and
in bringing the. track up. to grade.
The work was completed on Section
2 before the cold weather stopped
operations and will be finished on
Section 1 and 3 in the spring. The
track is being raised four inches in
places.
On November 15 the track lead
ing into the old townsite of Nebiah
was abandoned and with it the old
townsite was abandoned also. Ne
bish has been moved to what was
formerly called Whitefish Junction
and the Junction is no longer on the
map. The Nebish station is now lo
cated in the old Crookston ware
house at the Junction and B. M.
Tschoepe has been installed as agent.
J. J. Ospahl, William Everts and
William Russell were in the new vil
lage of Nebish last week and return
ed to Bemidji Thanksgiving day after
having platted the new townsite.
The lots have been made 25 by 140
feet and there will be alleys between
each two streets. Lots will be plac
ed on sale within a week or two as
the price has not yet been fixed.
Fred Cook, who has been operating
a saloon and lodging house at the
old Nebish location, will move to the
new townsite in the spring and is
planning to erect a building suitable
for hotel purposes. At the present
time the saloon of Cook and general
store of P. K. Rustvold are all that
is left at the old townsite.
E. M. Tschoepe will build a gener
al store on the new townsite in the
spring, the Red Lake line is to con
struct a modern depot, and several
residences will be built. At the pres
ent time camps are being operated
by Page and Hill and the St. Croix
people. The Crookston Lumber com
pany has its camps 5 and 6 located
to the west of Nebish and the Be
midji Lumber company will have a
camp to the north. Both companies
are cutting timber on the reservation
this winter and tote their supplies
from Nebish. They are connected
with Nebish by private telephone.
The cedar yards for poles and potts
at Nebish are being enlarged and
will be able to handle several thou
sand more this year than last. Sev
eral farmers have come into the coun
try this fall and are preparing to
move their stock and machinery on
the land in the spring. The Hay
Creek school house, in which Mips
Vaatveit instructs the youth of Ne
bish, has now twenty scholars and
expects more in the spring. Settlers
are enthusiastic over the prospects
of the country and say that in a
year or two Nebith will be the best
town on the Red Lake line.
Although the spur of the old town
site has been abandoned and the
town moved, the pottoffice is still
run by P. K. Rustvold in the old
Red Lake station. Several petitions
have been forwarded to Washington
and to Congressman Steenerton aak
ing_that the office be put at the now
COtttfBMt OB mot
-s
-"CD
-5*
"3J

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