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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, December 06, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-12-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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BEMIDJI SLATED
FOR NEXT MEETING
Twenty-five Beltrami Delegates Urg-
ing Development Association to
Come Here.
RESOLUTIONS PRESENTED TODAY
Those Passed by Committee Submit
ted to*fche Convention at Ses
sion This Afternoon.
MAY HAVE A VICE-PRESIDENT
Movement On Foot to Create New
OfficeWedge Boomed For
Treasurer.
Secretary
the committee and which will be pre
sented to the association
The action of the state reclaim
mg lands endorsed and the work to
be kept up.
Agricultural extension recommend
ed.
A general advertising and public
ity campaign recommended.
An increase in the efficiency of the
forestry board urged.
The legislature is urged to pass a
good seed law which will govern the
sale of all seed in the state.
Reapportionment is demanded.
The legislature is urged to make a
reserve of all standing timber owned
by lumber companies or others and
lying adjacent to the Itasca State
Park.
The work of the Immigration Com
mission is approved and commended.
The legislature is urged to license
all real estate brokers so that curb
stone trading by irresponsible parties
will be eliminated.
A resolution urging the adoption
of woman's suffrage will be present
ed.
To change the date of the state
fair to the second or third Monday
in September
The legislature will be asked to ap
propriate a liberal amount to be spent
for an agricultural exhibitor's build
ing at the state fair, the building to
be used to house land shows in the
winter months
The usual resolutions thanking of
ficers and hosts will be presented
Annie E Shelland, superintendent
of schools of Koochiching county, is
the only woman delegate present and
her seat was presented her by a
unanimous vote She appeared be
fore the committee on resolutions and i
urged the resolution on woman's suf
frage. It was adopted by the commit-1jPaul.
tee and will go to the convention this
afternoon
Give Sehroeder a Boost.
Hill spoke this morning and
boosted W Sehroeder of Bemidji
Mr Hill said that he was farming by
proxy all over Northern Minnesota
but that he believed W Sehroeder
of Bemidji, would make the best rec
ord. He stated that Sehroeder was
a careful and scientific farmer and
that he had thorough confidence in
him. His remarks were greeted by
loud applause which started with the
twenty-five Beltrami county delegates
and finally swept the convention
Special to The Pioneer:
Crookston, Dec. 6.The commit
tee on by-laws of the Northern Min
nesota. Development association have
proposed changes to read as follows:
'That the secretary be chosen by
the executive committee which shall
he composed of the president, treas
urer and one man elected from each
of the Sixth, Eighth and Ninth con
gressional districts. The secretary
and treasurer will be both secretary
and treasurer of the Northern Min
nesota Development association and
of the Immigration Commission."
The office of vice-president to be
"^l^WWf^^^g.
THE PROPOSED SLATE.
The following slate will be pre
sented to the association today and
will probably go through:
President, C. M. King, Deer River,
Vice-President, A Albright,! Logansport, Ind., Dec. 6.An in-
Bramerd.
W Mackenzie, Be
midji.
Treasurer,
midji
A Wedge, Jr, Be-
Special to The Pioneer:
Crookston, Dec 62 p. m.The
committee on resolutions is ready to
report as soon as the afternoon meet
ing is called to order. Following are
the resolutions which have passed
THE BEMIDJI
STEAMER EASTON IS IN
BAD PLIGHT ACCORDING
TO THE LATEST REPORTS
.ay United PTMM.
St. Paul, Dec. 6 "Weather is bad.
Outlook is dark," were the last words
heard from the Steamer Eastern of the
Booth line which is hanging sus
pended from rocks at Thunder Bay
five miles from shore. Fifteen pass
engers and a crew of twenty-five are
aboard according to the latest infor
mation from the scene.
The Easton went hard ashore in a
heavy fog thirty-five miles from Port
Arthur, Ont., Lake Superior, yester
day. .None of the passengers were
injured, it is said. Tugs immediately
were sent from Port Arthur to her
aid.
The Easton carries wireless, and
she later reported that she was in
sand and not badly damaged.
The tugs, according to the wireless
operator aboard the Easton were tak
ing off the passengers, while a light
er has been sent from Port Arthur to
remove the Easton's cargo.
The Easton is of 460 tons displace
ment, 155 feet long and 30-foot beam.
She runs between Duluth and Port
Arthur.
MURDERESS GETS EASY SEN-
TENCE FOR KILLING OF A
GOSSIPING NEIGHBOR
determinate term to the state wom
an's reformatory at Indianapolis of
from two to twenty-one years and a
fine of $25 and costs was the sen
tence Mrs. Elizabeth Lang, the young
bride who killed Mrs. Mary Copple, a
gossip, in defense of her good name.
The murder was committed the day
after Mrs. Lang was-married.
created and in the future meetings to
be held once a year instead of twice.
Are to Incorporate.
It is the intention of the asoscia
tlo
0 incorporat
scop
i
tha
actl0
als
a wide
i
pOBsiWe I
Dropose
tha
memb
ncommittere offlce
of the executivea
who becomes a candidate for a state
or national office must immediately
resign Whether he does or not, the
office to become vacant upon his an
nouncement as a candidate for office.
Bemidji After Next Meeting.
Hinckley is after the summer
meeting and Bemidji is after the next
winter meeting. Should it be de
cided to hold but one meeting a year,
that one will probably be held in
Bemidji next December. The assoc
iation was organized in Bemidji and
the city has not had the opportunity
to entertain it since it reached its
present size. There are twenty-five
delegates here from Beltrami coun
ty. Crookston is crowded and the
meeting is the best ever held from the
lewpoint of attendance.
Only a poor love letter
spoiled by weak spelling.
can be
For anyone in touch with national
political conditions there was no
shock or surprise in the presidential
election The outcome was surer
than the weather predictions for elec
tion day
Gov ernor Wilson was said to be un
decided about an extra session of con
gress, but he was the only American
in that condition Everybody else
knew that it was sure to happen
and then some
Jim Hill has bought a bank in Se
Wall street is rapidly coming
west, and in a score of years will be
nothing but a memory The world is
getting wise and there '"ain't no
lambs no more
There are 26.000,000 voters in the
United States Of these only 16,-
000,000 went to the polls, and uot of
this number Governor Wilson receiv
ed only about 6,300,000, or one
fourth of the total and two-fifths of
those voting.
SCOOP
THE CUB
REPORTER
P^W^P^^S^ff^S
've*yse^ f"*
MESSASE
FROM PRESIDENT TAFT TO CON-
GRESS TODAY IS OPTIMISTIC
RECOMMENDS GOETHELS TO
BE A MAJOR GENERAL
WANTS CURRENCY LEGISLA-
TION PASSED AT ONCE.
By united Press.
Washington, Dec. 6.In a message
teeming with optimism, President
Taft today urged upon congress an
advanced program of legislation 'on
the fiscal, judicial, military and in
sular affairs of the nation.
Pleading for the immediate pass
age of a currency reform measure
along the lines of the Aldrich plan,
the president edclared for a bigger
navy, a further reorganization of
the army to provide for a greater
reserve during times of peace con
tinued supervision over Porto Rico
and the Philippines federal regula
tion of water powers in navigable
streams and the promulgation of a
workingmen's compensation act.
The president highly praised Col
onel Goethals, chief engineer of the
Panama canal and recommended that
as a commendation of his wonder
ful work, Goethals be made major
general of the army with the title
of chief of engineers, when the pres
ent incumbent is relieved. The tar
iff, the president dismissed with a
few paragraphs.
'It was my belief that these cus
toms ought to be revised downward,"
he said, *'but now that a new con
gress has been elected on a platform
of a tariff for revenue only, rather
than a protective tariff it is needless
for me to occupy the time of congress
with arguments or recommendations
in favor of a protective tariff."
The $22,000,000,000 deficit which
appears" between the treasurer's re
port of estimated income for the com
ing year and the estimated expendi
tures, the president blamed on con
gress' failure to appropriate for the
two battleships last year, necessitat
ing an estimate for three this year.
The president's plea for a revised
banking and currency system was
particularly pressing. Declaring it
to be "the most crying need of the
country today," he recommended the
immediate adoption of an elastic
currency system along the lines of
the central bank idea proposed by
the Aldrich currency bill.
Discussing the prejudice which
greeted the central bank idea, the
president argued that it arose from
an erroneous idea of its powers and
a distrust of bankers by the people.
The president warmly commended
the recent adoption in the army of
the three year reserve clause, for en
listed men, which makes them subject
to draft in case of war, after their
enlistment has expired, and the milit
ia pay bill for the national guard,
the volunteer bill to provide for the
quick raising of forces in time of
war, and the adoption of the resident
soldiery idea for insular positions.
The Democratic congress abolished
the tariff board which President Taft
had established to take the tariff out
of politics, so now they must go it
alone and smite protection hip and
thigh, and that immediately.
In the crisp, bright October air
the sweet young thing had been for a
drive with her sweetheart, and re
turned freshened and glowing with
excitement.
"Oh, mother," she cried, "Tom and
I had the narrowest escape from an
awful accident. The horse nearly
bolted, and I don't know what would
have happened!
"We were going through a narrow
lane when, all of a sudden, a pheas
ant got up from the hedge and flew
across the horse's head and before
Tom could grasp the reins"
"Er," inquired the young brother'
"wasn't he holding them, then?",
And it took a long time to explain
clearly what actually did happen.
(Copyright.)
^4R-^^V'B ^\upwu MA
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 189. BEMIDJI, MEfNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 6, 1912. TEN CENTS PER WEEK-
THRILLED HIS AUDIENCE
President Vincent Held Delegates to
Development Meeting With
Strong Address.
TJBGED MOBE "TEAM PLAY."
Crookston, Dec. 6The Thursday
afternoon session of the Northern
Minnesota Development association
was held at the Crookston School of
Agriculture, where four of the larger
buildings were named.
One of the four, the Agricultural
Science building, just completed, was
dedicated and named James J.
Hill building in recognition of the
interest taken by James J. Hill when
the Northwest Experiment Station
was first established here by the state
University, later followed by the
Northwest School of Agriculture,
now the largest and best equipped
educational institution, coupled with
the Experiment Station, to be found
in Northern Minnesota.
President George Edgar Vincent,
University of Minnesota, delivered
one of the most forceful addresses
ever listened to before the develop
ment convention in the morning at
the Grand opera house, holding the
audience so close that a pinfall might
have been heard except during the
outbursts of applause. His address
in substance follows:
"If I rightly understand the pur
poses of this association it stands for
teamplay in developing the resources,
increasing the population, and organ
izing the social life of Northern Min
nesota. This team-play demands that
all participants keep steadily in mind
the larger common purpose, that no
individuals or groups seek narrower
advantage. Every member of the
team must do his part. Not only are
new settlers to be brought in, but
real-estate men, merchants, bankers,
political leaders, schools, churches,
will work together to afford congen
ial and encouraging conditions of
life.
"It is not sportman-like to cooper
ate to bring in the immigrant and
them to set about competing to ex
ploit him This association exists to
see that the game is played fairly.
It understands that a region cannot
be "boosted" into prosperity, but that
steady, fundamental work must be
done by a great variety of interests
all loyal to a fine, inspiring end,
namelyto make -life in Northern
Minnesota rewarding, interesting and
(Continued on last page).
Oi". V"ti'I1
TRYING MOMENTS FOR C. L. MEMBERS
The Clean Language League Proposes to Arrest and Prosecute Persons Indulging In Bad Language In Pue
lie.News Item.
Nineteen Days to
Christmas
Dec. 6
The Early Shopper Is
the Friend of
the Tired Shop GirL
SHOP TODAY.
SHOOT BIG BLACK BEAR
Sullivan and Wood, Blackduck Hunt-
ers, Bag Animal Weighing Over
200 Pounds.
KILLED IN TOWN OF SUMMIT
Blackduck, Dec. 6.A monstrous
black bear was the trophy secured
after a day's hunt by Messrs. James
F. Sullivan and Glenn M. Wood of
this village last Saturday. Mr. Wood',
tracked the bear for several hours on i
Friday and the next day in- company
with Mr. Sullivan the trail was tak- I
en up again. After following Mr.
Bruin for some distance the trail
was lost and for a time it looked as
though he had given the huntsmen
the slip when suddenly Mr. Wood
came upon him in his den. He called
to Mr. Sullivan to come up but about
this time the bear started toward
Mr. Wood. The latter wanted to
get a view of his prey before shoot
ing but Mr. Sullivan decided to take
no chances and with a well aimed
shot brought down the bear. It was
a large black one weighing between
two and three hundred pounds. They
went to a nearby house and tele
phoned to Dr Kbch who went out
and brought the bear to town in his
auto.
The place where the bear had his
den was only a short distance from
Chas Olson's home in Summit.
I Is-Yes, It Is~Not, I Isn't Bv "HOF
*AHT TO W
W*U FOR BufMlr
Wou XMft
'Sf
.JS^'MSi -5fta*a3kJ5
8 ^P
1
PIONEE
BINGHAM FOR MAYOR
Duluth Herald Man Boomed for
Chief Executive of His Home
City Under New Charter.
NEWS IS KEPT FROM HTM
Special to The Pioneer:
Crookston, Dec. 6.Stillman Bing
ham of the Duluth Herald, is being
boomed for the first mayor of Du
luth under the new commission form
of government charter recently
adopted. A wire to that effect reach
ed Crookston this morning.
Mr. Bingham is here attending the
meetings of the Northern Minnesota
Development association and efforts
are beirg made to hold the news from
Bingham for some time.
Bingham's naae appears to have
been received with universal favor
in Dujufh and at the present time it
looks much as if he woufd be the
next chief executive of his home
city.
CAMP'S ALL-AMEBICAN TEAMS.
First Seven.
End, Felton of Harvard.
Tackle, Bnglehorn of Dartmouth.
Guard, Pennock of Harvard.
Center, Ketcham of Yale.
Guard, Logan of Princeton.
Tackle, Butler of Wisconsin
End, Bomeisler of Yale.
Quarter, Crowther of Brown.
Halfback, Brickley of Harvard.
Halfback, Thorpe of Carlisle.
Fullback, Mercer of Pennsylvania.
Second: Eleven.
End, Very of Pennsylvania State.
Tackle, Probst of Syracuse.
Guard. Cooney of Yale.
Center, Parmenter of Harvard.
Guard, Kulp of Brown.
Tackle, Trickey of Iowa.
End, Hoeffel of Wisconsin.
Quarter, Pazzetti of Lehigh.
Halfback, Morey of Dartmouth.
Halfback, Norgren of Chicago.
Fullback, Wendell of Harvard.
Third Eleven.
End Ashbaugh of Brown.
Tackle, Shaughnessy of Minnesota.
Guard, Bennett of Dartmouth.
Center, Blumenthal of Princeton.
Guard, Brown of Annapolis.
Tackle, Devroe of West Point.
End, Jordan of Bucknell.
Quarter. Bacon of Wesleyan.
Halfback, Hafdage of Vanderbilt.
Halfback, Baker of Princeton.
Fullback, Pumpelly of Yale.
&* Puewt IF Wl
c/Mrr TAKE HOTC frits
BW*D UNDtSTUS*
Onia am.. w
.^ESM&S
MAY HAVE SHEET
CARS IN SflffiK
Iowa Real Estate Men Have
ahuble Holding Ataaf
posed Right of Way.
GASOLINE OB ELBCTKtGXTT
To be Used As Motive Power ami Liaa
Kay Be Started At Sooa Aa
Mills Kun Again.
TO PLOT SUBUEBAX HOMES
Plan Includes Small Farms On Bed
Lake and M. ft I. BeadsCity
Bonte Laid Ont.
Making small purchases of farm
and city property on each of some
twelve or fifteen trips to Bemidji
during the past three months a Cedar
Rapids, Iowa, man has gradually ob
tained title to some of the best city
and nearby country real estate that
has been on the market. It is said
that he represents a large Iowa real
estate company.
When the purchases of this com
pany are indicated on a map of Be
midji and vicinity, it is seen that
they follow a well denned route. This.
fact, together with the information
received by the Pioneer that certain
parties have been negotiating with
the M. & I. and Red Lake railroads
for trackage rights, has led to the
belief that outsiders are preparing
for a Bemidji street car service. To
add to the belief, Thomas Roycrqft,
general manager of the Grand Fofhx
Street Railway company, has bought
property at Riverside and has stated
that Riverside would make an excel
lent railway terminal.
The real estate bought has been
acquired by the Iowa company is
small lots from different real estate
firms so that the buying would not
attract attention From the Missis
sippi river on the eastern city limits,
the company has eleven pieces of
property which lie along the M. &
right of way as far north as the Bass
Lake road and three more parcels at
Riverside have recently changed
hands. On the Red Lake road, the
company has obtained land at Ander
son's and Marsh's sidings and four
pieces near Werner. Other parcels
have been bought on Big Turtle,
Gnatt, and Movill lakes.
The Pioneer is told that W. H.
Gemmell, general manager of the 1C
& I. has been apprroached with a
proposition involving trackage rights
between the Bemidji Union depot and
Nymore next spring with the possibil
ity of extending the service north as
far as Turtle River later. It is said
that if satisfactory arrangements can
be made, a railroad company will be
formed among men who have the cap
ital ready and that it will start oper
ating between Bemidji and Nymore
as soon aa the mills open next spring.
At the present time, those interested
are talking gasoline operated cars or
gasoline and electricity combined.
It is also stated that officials of the
Red Lake line were approached some
months ago with a proposition of the
new company to use the Red Lake
tracks as far north as Werner with
the possibility of later taking over
all of the Red Lake passenger serv
ice. The proposition came to the offi
cials indirectly but it was under
stood at the time that they were will
ing to negotiate.
As far as can be learned at 'his
time, the street car proposition 4s aa.
follows:
As soon as the mills start next
spring, a .gasoline car will be put in
operation between Bemidji and Ny
more over the M. & I. tracks with
possibly a spur built through the box
factory yards to the village.
Should proper arrangements be
made, the service will be extended to
Turtle River with yards and termin
als on the Mississippi river at River
side.
Service also to be inaugurated on
the Red Lake line as far north as
Werner and to go farther when con
ditions warrant.
A street line to be built north from
the Union depot in the city on Min
nesota avenue, across to Irvine ave
nue and then to the city limits.
When the service on the M. 4b
has reached Turtle River and Werner
on the Red Lake line, to build a cross
country line from Werner to Turtle
River which will touch Movill lake.
This line may be built from Lavinta
instead of Turtle River and opes the
country at the head of Late Bemid
ji.
tfbstimwA as las* pegt"
J.
Si
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