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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, December 10, 1912, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1912-12-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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RO0SEV&T LAUDS
THE PROGRESSIVES
In Speech Before Bull Moose Meeting
In Chicago at Noon Today, He
Praises New Party.
STILL CLAIMS THE LEADERSHIP
Refuses to Admit that Toga Will Be
Worn In the Future By Senator
Beveridge.
HAVE FOUGHT A GREAT FIGHT"
Says Corrupt Machine In the Repub
lican Ranks Has Been Com
pletely Overthrown.
By United Press.
Chicago, Dec. 10.Only by infer
ence did Colonel Theodore Roosevelt
eliminate himself as the real leader
of the Progressive party in his speech
here today, the chief event in today's
conference of the party leaders.
The former president covered much
of the ground touched in Ms final
speeches of the recent campaign.
Roosevelt insisted that the Progres
sive party has come to stay and he'
pleaded with its representatives in
both congress and the state legisla
tures to try to carry into effect the
Progressive legislative program, espe
cially that which would provide for
federal supervision of the trusts
Industrial justice for women and
children, and for all wage workers
was also one of the great problems
that must be immediately met accord
ing to the colonel.
Thelre was little in what the col
onel sard that could be construed as
settling h.is views on fusion in vari
ous localities and he insisted over
and over again that the Progressive
party is-here to stay and that every
member of it stands fully by all of
its platform declarations.
Have Fought a Great Fight.
"We have fought a great fight,"
said the colonel, "and accomplished
more in ninety days than ever any
party in our history accomplished in
such a length of time. We have
forced all parties and candidates to
give at least lip service to Progres
sive principles.
"In this brief campaign we have
overthrown the powerful and corrupt
machine that betrayed and strangled
tlhe Republican party
Roosevelt reviewed again the "theft
of the delegates" to the Republican
convention at Chicago, and repeated
former denunciations of the paTty
bosses.
Campaign Gifts.
Roosevelt declared for popular con
tributions campaign funds, but ap
parently referring to some of the big
contributions made to his own cam
paign fund, said:
"I am willing that the party should
take the large campaign contribu
tions, if honestly offered without con
dition or reservation, on exactly the
same terms and in exactly the same
spirit a the small contribution The
real test of such gifts to a political
party is the motivenot the size."
Direct primaries everywhere were
urged by the colonel, and he made a
special plea for an educational cam
paign to begin everywhere to post
the people on the merits of the Pro
gressive social and economical pro
blem.
Farmers Should Co-Operate.
The various problems of rural life
were enumerated by Roosevelt at the
great problem requiring immediate
solution, "Farm financing," he said,
"should now receive the consideration
it deserves. It will be interesting to
note with what success our farmers
will take up or adopt the European
co-operative financing system of the
Raiffeisen type. The greatest field
for "farmers co-operation will be in
marketing their product, which pro
cess now costs them and the con
sumer dearly. The promptest and
largest measure of financial aid
would come from mortgage banks
chartered, regulated and carefully
supervised by the government, oper
ated on the methods of the credit
Fancier of France.
"This plan gives the farmer long
time loans of thirty to fifty years,
with the arrangement that small an
nual payments amounting to seven or
eight per cent would automatically
amortize or wipe out the entire debt
at the end of the term. The bor
rowed money would be used largely
for creative purposes and the easy
payments would permit part of the
farm income to be used for conserva
tion and the general advantage of
tttstt,iial
So
THE BEMIDJI
KIAMIL PASHA.
VsnsrabU Turkish Statesman
Who May B* Prima Minister.
the farm and the family, removing
the pressure of the large and bur
densome payments of short time
mortgages and the fear of foreclo
sure. TAFT FAMILY TO OCCUPY
THE PINCHOT HOME
By United Press.
Washington, Dec. 10.A Taft fam
ily occupying a Bull Moose mansion
will be a social spectacle of the cap
ital this season. The big, stone res
idence of Gifford Pinchot, former
chief forester, on Dupont Circclein
"Millionaire Row"has been leased
for the winter season by Mrs. Thomas
K. Laughlin, sister of Mrs. Taft.
Pinchot, who was a Roosevelt
leader, has not occupied his home for
more than a year. It is one of the
finest in Washington, and promises,
under the direction of Mrs. Laugh
lin, to be a social mecca during the
session of congress.
ABERCROMBEE HEADS ROLL.
By United Press.
Washington, Dec 10.J. W. Aber
crombie, newly elected member of
congress from Tuscaloosa, Tenn., will
bear the distinction of having his
name first on the house roll, displac
ing John M. Adair of Indiana who
held the position for six years.
The second letter in Aberorombie's
name is responsible. It is "b" and in
alphabetical a rrangement of the
house roll he becomes the official bell
wether of the Democrats. On party
votes the sound of Abercrombie's
name will be the signal for the Re
publicans to vote directly opposite.
LIABLE FOR BIG FINE.
By United Press.
London, Dec. 10 The fact that he
has voted ninety-three times in the
House of Commons since last March,
may cost Sir Stuart M. Samuel, Lib
eral for the Whittechappel divi
sion, the sum of $232,500. He is a
partner in the firm of Samuel Mon
tagu & Co., which has recently receiv
ed the government contract for buy
ing silver, and parliamentary proce
dure lays it down that no member of
a firm doing business with the gov
ernment may sit in the house. Sir
Stuart ought to have resigned his
seat immediately his firm got the con
tract, according to his critices, and
the attorney general is investigating
the matter. He is liable to a fine of
$2,500 for every time he has voted
since hiis seat automatically became
vacant. A good many nasty things
have been said about thai silver con
tract and the firm of Samuel Mon
tagu, and 'the question is being asked
whether Under-Secretary for India,
E Scott Montagu has any connection
with the firm He is a nephew of
Sir Stuart Samuel and brother of
Lord Swaythling, head of the firm.
If some men would quit looking
for a soft political snap and stick to
their regular employment they would
be better off financially.
SCOOP
TH
REPORTER
/seoop-*s-we. sa.r* Cieus/
HWl,i WANT "*ao To
TWfe PWST KID
THT *mrrwn 5#vn%
TO*. #t HIS LtTTE*.,
AhOCttR6rruR
tJL
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 192. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, 1WESBJ0 EVENING, DECEMBER 10, 1912.
INDICTED
PARKER NOW HELD IN FARI-
BAULT COUNTY ON GRAND
LARCENY CHARGE.
By United Tress.
Blue Earth, Dec. 10. Harry W.
Parker was indicted for grand larc
eny today in connection with his de
fault as cashier of the Winnebago
bank.
EASTON IS SAFE
Duluth, Dec. 10.Heavily covered
with ice the steamer Easton of the
Booth line, which had been on Iro
quois reef, near Port Arthur, from
early Thursday morning until Friday
evening, reached Duluth at 11:55 last
night.
A large crowd braved the bitter
cold to witness the return to the
home port of the vessel wMch many
had given up for lost, stood on the
slippery asphalt (piers of the ship can
al, and cheered as the staunch little
ship ploughed its way through the
government ship canal.
At 5:30 last Thursday morning,
the Easton, hugging the north shore
of Lake Superior, ran on the rock,
going nearly over the reef, but bung
midship, its nose in deep water and
its stern so high that the wheel was
out oe water.
A wireless message from the strand
ed vessel to Port Arthur, brought a
tug accompanied by a lighter to the
scene. A high sea was rolling and
all attempts to remove the passengers
were fruitless.
The storm prevailed during all of
Thursday but the Easton withstood
the high sea. Late Friday the sea
subsided sufficiently to enable seven
ty-five tons of its cargo to be trans
ferred to the lighter and the Easton
was released.
Caipbain Hockanson reported by
wireless to the home office that the
ship was "off the rocks, un
and every one well and happy."
During the perilous' hours on the
reef, so great was the confidence of
theipassengers and crew that they re
fused to leave the boat.
'The Easton is not like other
boats. The toughness of the boat,
constructed with a view of standing
the gales and h&rdshinp of Northern
Lake Superior, was attested by the
ease with which it withstood the
(Continued from firot page).
KING'S CHAIR REMOVED.
By United Press.
London, Dec. 10.Ultra-loyalists,
ever sensitive about the kingly dign
ity, are demanding the head of Lord
Chancellor Haldane, who has been
guilty of the heinous crime of ban
ishing the king's chair from the
Privy council chamber. It is true
that the chair has not been used for
well over a couple of centuries, but
the big empty red chair has always
occuipied the place of honor at the
council table. Until the time King
George the First, English soverigns
always presided over meetings of the
council and its committees, cabinet
judicial. The Hanoverian monarch,
however, could not speak sufficient
English to keen up the practice, so
he left the presidency to the lord
resident. The empty chair beside
that of the president, however, re
minded the councillors of the kingly
presence, in spirit, but Haldane who
has been doing a good deal of sweep
ing round, has had it cleared out.
DYER IS RETAINED
At a meeting of the school board
last night, Professor Dyer, head of
the Bemidji schools, was given a new
contract for three years at an in
crease in salary of $200 His first
term of three years will be up this
year.
On the request of the teachers, the
Christmas vacation was extended to
include the first Monday in January
so that the teachers could spend Sun
day at home. The vacation will start
December 20.
BERNHARDT IS COMING
The Divine Sarah "to Appear In Be
midji Saturday and Sunday
with Sunday Matinee.
HER FIRST VISIT TO THIS CITY
Sarah Bernhardt, probably the most
famous actress of modern times, will
be in Bemidji Saturday and Sunday
of this week. That is, she will be
in spirit,, if g$ in. body, fof C. J.
Woodmansee, manager of the Majes
tic theatre, has arranged to show the
film "Queen Elizabeth" in which
Bernhardt has the leading role.
Sarah Bernhardt needs no intro
duction to the American public but
tihis is the first time that she ever
appeared before a camera. The film
has been shown in Chicago, Kansas
City, Minneapolis, New York, Boston
and other large cities and has won
favorable comment in each case. The
scenes of the famous tragedy are
thrown on the screen in a continuous
picture which is free from the un
steadiness which characterized the
first moving picture.
The version of "Elizabeth" used is
comprehensive enough to tell the es
sential parts of the essay yet the film
runs only one hour. The drama is
well presented as the close grouping
necessary to get all of the actors be
fore the machine made the work of
getting the film difficult. The stage
settings and costumes are from
Bernhairdt's own Paris theatre. The
company is her own also.
The film shows Bermardt as the
proud Elizabeth the humble Eliza
beth the commanding Elizabeth the
pleading Elizabeth, the yielding Eliz
abeth the iron souled Elizabeth
Elizabeth the high-hearted the
broken-hearted Elizabeth, singing
the death of Essex in a fury of jeal
ousy, and dying herself of a tender
remorse.
You can see It all.
Bernhardt is the consummate art
ist. And Bernhardt is clever. Per
haps as clever as any move of all her
kaleidoscopic career was the decision
to~projeot her matchless art, unfetter
ed by limitations of language,
through the medium of the film.
On the last visit of that other
great actress, Ellen Terry, to Kansas
City, she said in an interview:
'*Ah, BernhardtBernhardt! What
need has Bernhardt of words, when
her soul is mirrored in her face."
Most of the so-called theatrical
stars are rockets.
Even Santa Draws The Line At Some Things
Fifteen Days to
Christinas
!3*8K83'8S^^^X^^
Dec. 1 0
The early shopper gets the cream
of that there is no doub t.
The Procrsstinstor 'II, jet rau
If you
Bent
Watch
Out!
Buy Those Christmas Things
Now
RECOUNT IS STARTED
P. S. Arnold for J. O. Harris, Thay
er Bailey for C. O. Moon, and Fred
Rhoda for the district court were ap
pointed a board of inspectors to re
count the votes cast in the election
for register of deeds this fall and be
gan work at 9 a. m. this morning. Ac
cording to Mr. Moon, it will take
about three days to complete the
count. The official count showed five
votes for Harris in excess of those
cast for Moon and Mr. Moon has ask
ed for a recount.
ASSOCIATED CHARITIES'
SUBSCRIPTIONS START TO
COME IN TO COMMITTEE
The committee of the Associated
Charities, which is securing funds for
the relief of the poor at once, reports
that $139 in cash and other donations
in goods have been secured to date.
When the association was organified,
it was decided that it would be nec
essary to raise funds at once as sev
eral poor families are in dire need of
relief.
The temporary committee makes
the following request:
"As it is not possible for us to see
every one who may like to donate,
we ask that those who have not re
ceived calls and wish to make a sub
scription, will send their money to
G. D. Backus, treasurer. This is a
public proposition and the association
is organized to unify all the forces of
charity in Bemidji. Money and goods
are badly needed at this time of the
year.
"MRS. E. H. SMITH,
"MRS. J. P. HENNESSEY,
"MISS L. L. BERMAN."
rHeRfs THE. FWsr LETTER TO SAHTAT
BOSS IT SAXSJ-'otWR SAMTt- PLEASE
[B*|NfrWe A AWftSHtp, A AWTERBECI^
A "TfcPEBeR BOAT, A MILLION
DOLLARS AHD A K*|_ UVC
I^UERWAKrr
PIONEE
GOOD CROWD AT FARRIS
First Meeting of Extension Series
Held Yesterday Afternoon With
Thirty-six Present.
ARE IN KEI.TJHKR TODAY
Miss Beatrice Eddy, P. B. McLaren
and A. E. Nelson balked to thirty-six
J!9Qta
in J^J| yesterday at the first
meeting of tfce-4*teoek series being
held under Mr. Nelsoflfa direction this
week and next. Miss Eddy replaced
Miss Margaret Bull on the program
as Miss Bull was unable to make
train connections. Mr. McLaren ar
rived in Parris about 3 p. m. coming
from Wrenshall and the entire party
returned to Bemidji at 4:30 on the
Soo.
Here they were met by Miss Bull
who^ad come from Minneapolis and
tbje^Jjfip to Kelliher was made. A
meeting is being held in Kelliher this
afternoon at which addresses will be
made by each member of the party.
It is being backed by the Kelliher
Commercial club.
At Fanris yesterday Miss Eddy
talked to the ladies present on the
"Farm Kitchen" outlining several
things that the women can do to
make life in the kitchen easier. She
urged that the kitchen be kept light
and airy and that every precaution
be taken against allowing germs a
breeding place. Mr. Nelson spoke on
the "Dairy Cow" illustrating his talk
with charts.
Mr. McLaren stepped off the Great
Northern and was at once called upon
to speak. He held his audience un
til the Soo train whistled as he was
talking "Root Crops" and the farm
ers were getting some valuable in
formation. Mr. McLaren advised the
raising of sugar beets and rutabagas
claiming that they were equal in val
ne as winter feed
"I believe in the raising of big
rutabagas," he said. "They are
easier to handle and get the most
pounds per acre. I do not cut them
up but feed them whole and find that
the stock does not choke Mr. Mc
Laren also gave some practical ways
for thinning out and cutting the tops
off of beets with a hoe.
In speaking of winter feed, he said,
"I believe that the best feed is ob
tained by feeding one pound of grain
to four pounds of roots. The farmer
who weeighs his feed is the farmer
who gets ahead. More corn fodder and
less hay in the winter will make
your stock look better in the spring."
Bv "HOP
I HA* CASHED US
Hts CHECKS i
TEN GENTS PER WEEK.
BEMIDJI BUYERS
TO SAVE MONEY
Five Per Cent, to the Anu^t of
road Fare, Will be Refunded
Next Week.
MERCHANTS FLAN BIO SALES
Advertisements Will Appear In Daily
Pioneer Showing Bargains to
Be Offered.
FARMERS ALSO GET BEMKHT
Will be Allowed Three Cents a Mile
Each Way For Each Family
Member Making Trip,
From Monday to Saturday of next
week, out of town people who have
been trading in Bemidji can come
here to do their Christmas shopping
and at the same time save all or A
portion of their railroad fare. This
offer has been made possible by the
banding together of a score of Be
midji merchants who announce that
during next week they will allow five
per cent on every purchase to the
amount of the railroad fare of the
purchaser and his family.
Every merchant who has co-oper
ated in this movement will offer in
ducements in the way of goods and
prices that cannot be surpassed or
duplicated in any city of Northern
Minnesota. These stores will give
better merchandise for the money,
and so extend the buying power* of
the family pocketbook, and will aiso
allow a refund of five percent to {$*
amount of the railroad fare so thai
the trip to Bemidji and return will be
made at thed* expense.
'The stores are combining-in this
movement in order to advertise Be
midji as a trading center. Adver
tisments, which will state, what they
have ito offer will be first printed in
the Daily Pioneer next Friday and
will be reprinted in the papers next
week. In order that entire families
will come, the refund offer includes
all members of the buyer's families.
For farmers who will drive to Be
midji next week to shop a refund wHI
be made of three cents for each mile
to and from the farm and for each
member of the family who accom
panies him. All milages and refunds
are to be computed in the Pioneer
office. Refunds will be made only by
the merchants whose names appear
at the end of this article. No re
fund will be made for more than the
amount of the railroad fare.
The system of making the refunds
is best explained by taking an ac
tual example. John Brown lives at
Clearbrook and will come to Bemidji
next week to buy Christmas goods.
Mr. Brown will be accompanied by
his wife and son. They will arrive
in Bemidji about 10 a m. and will
leave at 4:37 p. m. They will first
go to one of the stores on the list
and will ask for a refund slip. After
the purchase is made the amount will
be endorsed on the slip. This will
be done at each of the store on the
list as eaoh purchase is completed.
When he is through shopping, Mr.
Brown will call at the Pioneer office
where his total purchases will be
totaled. It is thirty miles to Clear
brook and the round trip fare for
himself and family will be $5.40. If
he has bought $108 worth of goods
during the day, he has paid his tra
veling expenses. If he buys less, or
$25 worth, he will be refunded
$1.25 to apply on his expenses.
Should Mr. Brown happen to be a
farmer in town of Frohn who drives
in eight miles and buys $40 worth of
goods on one trip, he will receive a
refund of $1.44 for himself, wife and
child, or $2.00 if he brings in three
or more children.
The stores which have combined in
making next week a big shopping
week and .whose advertisments will
appear in the Pioneer are as follows:
Abercrombie's novelty store.
Akerberg & Kittleson, men's fur
nishings.
Barker's drug and jewelry store.
Geo. T. Baker &. Co., jewelry store.
Bazaar Store, dry goods, etc.
Battles hardware store.
Berman Emporium, dry goods, etc.
T. J. Crane & Co., women's- ready-
to-wear, etc.
Carlson's Variety store?
Fair Store, five and ten cent store.
Gill Brothers, clothing store.
Given Hardware company.
Lahr*a furniture store.
Megrofah's variety store.
Murphy, furniture stove. '_
Netser's drug store.
cesattassa last sase^
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