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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, January 14, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1913-01-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOLUME ft. NUMBER 22G.
MAY PUT LUMBER
ON THE FREE LIST
Move Was Indicated in the House
Yesterday at One of'the Demo
cratic Program.
HEAVY TOLL ON COSTLY SILKS
Are Considered Luxuries by Under
wood, Who is Told That Demand
Follows the Fashions.
LOW RATES ON NECESSITIES
Leaders Believe They Should Be
Hade Cheap as PossibleMetal
Tariffs Up Today.
Washington, Jan. 14.Free rough
and dressed lumber, squared timber,
shingles, retention'of approximately
the present high tariff on the higher
grades of silk, and reductions in the
cheaper silks used by the common
people, and a penalizing drastic tar
iff bar to shut out "dynamite" silks,
were indicated yesterday as parts of
the expected Democratic revision
program.
When hearings on the wood and
silk schedule! closed, sentiment fav
ored the inclusion of these provisions,
possibly together with free meats, in
a tentative tariff plan. The ways and
means committee will submit this to
the extra session of congress.
The burden of the testimony on
the wood schedule was a plea for the
preservation of the present tariff
rates. Silks, involving immense in
terests, presented a complexity of
technicalities, perhaps' greater than
any of the other thirteen schedules of
the tariff law.
Horace Cheney of South Manches
ter, Conn., acted as spokesman of the
manufacturers. He said:
"Silks depend upon fashion. If
women want anything they will pay
the amount they have to, to get it."
Chairman Underwood considers
that most silks are a luxury. He said:
"We want to get a large amount of
revenue on luxuries so we can put
less tax on the necessities of life."
The hearing today will be on the
metal tariff.
M. & I. TRAIN RACED MULES
FROM BEMIDJI TO FARLEY
Trainmen on the M. & I. road are
laughing at the crew in charge of the
north bound passenger train last Fri
day night. The train was manned
by Engineer Leak, Fireman George
Bridgman and Conductor Bush. At
North Bemidji a span of mules took
the track ahead of the train and in
spite of frantic signals from Mr.
Bush and rauceous tootings of the
engine's whistle, the mules stayed in
front until they got stuck in a bridge
this side of Farley.
From Bemidji to Turtle River it
was a race. In spite of the best ef
forts of Fireman Bridgman, the train
could not gain a foot on the fleet
footed sons of Missouri. When the
train slowed down for the Turtle
River stop the mules disappeared
around the bend in a haze of flying
snow. Near Farley the passenger
caught up and found them stuck in
the bridge. It took the combined
efforts of train crew, engine crew and
a few passengers to get the mules out.
Fireman Bridgman said that he
hated to run second to a pair of
mules. Passengers said that the M.
& I. reminded them of a "slow train
through Arkansas."
U. C. T. MANAGERS CHANGE
DATES OF DANCING PARTIES
The committee in charge of the U.
C. T. dances has made some changes
in dates for future dances. The next
dance will be held at the city hall,
Friday evening, January 17. Be
cause Lent begins February the
dance formerly scheduled 'for the
seventh of that month has been
changed to January 31, and the fol
lowing dance after that date will
not be given until March 28.
The dances given by the Commer
cial Travelers so far have been well
attended and the fund which is being
raised to send the local council to
the state convention at Crookston the
coming summer is growing.
The members of the local council
want to go "fight," when they go,
and when Bemidji appears at the
state convention it will be there with
the Bemidji band and flying colors.
Suggestions have been advanced by
some of Bemidji businessmen that
the trip be made by automobile.
j&tVaS'yj&K
ftSVi*-*
S
HENRY D. CLAYTON.
Chairman of Houu Judioiary Com
smltt, Who Plana Truat Inquiry.
Photo by American Press Association.
LOUIS W. HILL REGRETS.
H. C. Baer, secretary of the $
3 Commercial club, this morning $
received a telegram from Louis $
S W. Hill regretting that he could $
3 not attend the banquet at the S
Markham ^Thursday night. Gen- $
$ eral Passenger Agent Noble also $
S sent regrets, but will be repre- S
sented by Assistant Passenger $
$ Agent Wilde. Mr. Baer and Mr. $
$ Burke were selling tickets to 3
S the banquet this morning. $
s$ss$$e3e$se$ss
TERRIFIC STORM ON ATLANTIC
DISABLES STEAMERS WHICH ARE
NOW CREEPING INTO NEW YORK
By United Tress.
New York, Jan. 14.New tales of
the terrific storms that have swept
the North Atlantic during the past
week reached port today, one brought
in, by the. battered CunarderCaronia
and another coming by wireless and
telling of"~thV'disa^biemetfP^or tirer
Hamberg-American freight steamer
Abyssinia, which broke down in mid
ocean and is now being towed to port
by the White Star ..line freighter
Armenian.
According to the Caronia's com
mander, Capt. O. C. Rostron, the man
who brought the Carpathia to the
rescue of the Titanic's survivors, the
voyage just ended was the strongest
he ever experienced.
The heavy wind and high seas
continued with unabated fury for
over two days. The life boat was
torn from its moorings and swept
far out to sea. The _captain ducked
just in time to let the heavy boat
fly over his head, like an airship. The
waves reached such gigantic propor
tions that the decks of the ship were
almost continually under water.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE DOCTOR
FREED OF MANSLAUGHTER
By United Press.
New Orleans, Jan. 14.Declaring
that Christian Science practitioners
do not come-under the law for pun
ishment of unqualified medical practi
tioners because "they use prayer and
not drugs or other, medical appli
ances," Judge John Fisher 'ri crim
inal court today released Robert J.
Henderson, accused of illegal prac
tice in the case of a thirteen-year-old
child of P. Lawrence, who died of
diphtheria.. 'Her father refused to
call a physician. Lawrence was freed
without a trial on a manslaughter
charge several days ago.
TWO KILLED FORTY INJURED
IN ENGLISH TRAIN WRECK
By United Preee.
Birmingham, England, Jan. 14.-
Two were killed and forty seriously
injured when an express train on the
Midland railway crashed into an ac
commodation train at Bromford
bridge late Monday afternoon.
SCOOP
THE CUB
REPORTER
MRS. SAM PAQUIN CALLED
"j^v-'.i
1
Mrs. Sam Paquin, of Turtle River,
died in the Samaritan hospital this
noon, at the age of twenty-six. She
was taken to the hospital Saturday
after an illness of several monhs.
MRS. SAM PAQUIN.
Mrs. Paquin was formerly Miss Inga
Brynildson, of Bemidji, and has many
friends here. She was employed in
the Pioneer office for several months
prior to her marriage a little over
two years ago. Funeral arrangements
will be announced later.
MASQUERADE "SKATE"
Tonight at seven o'clock the roller
masquerade will begin and as over
fifty pairs of skates have been reserv
ed at present one of -the largest
crowds that ever atended anything
of this kind in Bemidji, is expected.
Mr. MacLachlan has offered four
prizes for the best dressed and most
comic costumes. At 9:30 all will
unmask and everyone will be allowed
to skate until eleven o'clock.,
Bitra skate boys will be on hand
and everything possible will be ar
J^anged "for the convenience of those
present. A refreshment stand will
be added and will probably be oper
ated from now on A new supply of
plates and skate material was re
ceived yesterday and men have been
employed to put old skates in repair
so there will "be plenty of skates for
all tonight. Three floor managers
will be employed' for this evening
and anyone out of order will be ex
pelled from the hall.
SUNDAY SCHOOL INSTITUTE.
To be held in the Presbyterian
Church Sunday Afternoon and
Evening, January 19, 1913.
2:30 2:45 3:45
4:15V 4:4
Afternoon Session.
Praise service..
.V. .Rev: C. G. Chandler.
Twentieth Century Goals
Mrs. Jean E. flobart.
Symposium:
"Pastor's Relation /to the
Sunday School."
"Duties and Qualifications
of Superintendent
"Secretary's Records and Re
ports."
"Duties of Treasurer."
"Duties of Associate Super
intendent."
"Sunday School Enroll-
ment."
Open Parliament.
"The1
5 Power of the Story"
Mrs! Jean E. Hobert.
/:_.:. Evening Session.
8 Service of song.
8:15 Tetf minutes with the Word,'
8:25 -The Supreme Aim,".,.
v'''.- .Mre.: Jean, ,E. Hobart.
Everybody -interested in Sunday
school worked is urged to attend this
Institute.
-The* above program will be pre
sented at i-iackduc Saturday morn
ing and afternoon and at Funkley in
the evening. Chas, H. Flesher, coun
ty president.
(Copyright.)
GUILTY ON I COUNTS
Senate Yesterday Convicted Judge
Robert Archbald and Barred Him
From All Federal Offices.
MISBEHAVIOR MISDEMEANOR
By United Press.
Washington, Jan 14.Commerce
Court Judge Archjrttld late Monday
afternoon wai^ -gi#iif*the maximum,,
penalty under"theftiapejiclrihent^:fol^
lowing his conviction on five charges
of the house. Removal, from the fed
eral judiciary Including the com
merce court and also disqualification
from ever holding any federal office
was the decision of the senate.
Judge Robert W. Archbald was im
peached for "misbehavior and mis
demeanor in office." Archbald was
convicted on fiv of thirteen articles
of impeachmentthe first, third,
fifth and thirteenth.
After a vote of three hours on the
separate articles the senate went into
executive session to decide whether
Archbald should be disqualified for
ever from holding public office or
only removed from the judiciary.
Conviction of any of the thirteen ar
ticles carried the penalty, however,
of removal from the bench, the high
est vote was 68 to 8 against Archbald
on the first count, regarding his ne
gotiations for the Katydid culm bank.
The lowest vote against him was on
Article when only Senator Ashurst
voted "guilty."
The impeachment proceedings
against Judge Archbald were started
early in 1912 when complaint was
made,to the interstate commerce com
mission and later to Attorney General
Wickersham and President Taft that
Judge Archbald had been concerned
in influencing railroads to grant him
certain favors in connection with
coal land-deals and the settlements
of cases involving c6al properties.
The house of representatives called
upon President Taft for a copy of the
charges against the commerce court
judge and in May, 1912, it began an
investigation, through the judiciary
committee which ended in the recom
mendation that Judge. Archbald be
impeached/V'
1' o:
Judge Archbald had admitted prac
tically all of the facts as to his nego
tiations for culm properties but in
each case he maintained that the bus
iness negotiations were innocent in
themselves and that he had not in
any way misused his judicial power
fCwttBued outlast pace).
PREPARING FOR WAR
READ PIONEER AD.
Otto, John, Nels and J. N.
HJelm, all of Domaas, came to
Ben idji today to look at a saw
mill outfit which was advertised
r- in the Pioneer's want columns.
The Hjelms are farmers at Do
maas and intend to do some
sawing next spring. They sub
scribed for the Pioneer in order
to get to touch with other live
bargains and incidentally get
the county news,
WHO PUT THE SIGN
0N STANTON'S LAWN*
This morning bright and early or
some time late last night a culprit,
whose taste runs to bright colors, and
who apparently is one of those little
short fellows Who cuts across lawns
in the summer time, erected a large,
red, gaudy sign on the front lawn of
the Dr. D. IJ. Stanton residence on
Bemidji avenue. The sign reads as
follows:
"PLEASE KEEP OFF THE GRASS."
These words apeared on both sides
of the big red placard in large black
letters.
"Did you erect the sign," was ask
ed Doctor Stanton this morning. "No,
I did not, but I wish I could find out
who did. It's the best stunt ever. I
Want to thank the person for it."
All day pedestrians have turned to
look at the new sign as they passed
by the Stanton residence, and if it
was intended for a joke it serves its
purpose heter than anything else.
The Stanton lawn is one of the many
which was treated with little consid
eration during the grass season last
year.
BUYS THIRD CADILLAC.
A. P. White has purchased a 1913
Cadillac car from the Northern Au
tomobile company. This is the third
Cadillac that Mr. White has pur
chased.
LIBRARY WANTS MAGAZINES
The library board is anxious at all
times to receive full sets of old
magazines. These will be bound if
a set of six consecutive issues of a
monthly publication is given. Hav
ing subscribed for the magazine in
dex this year, the library is in a
position to supply more information
than in the past. Many new books
have recently been added and the
library is being used by more people
each month.
Scoop Is Som Critic By "HOP
AUSTRIA
RUSSIA
-^iu
HEADS LITTLE FORK BANK
George French, Former County
Treasurer, Assumed Office of
Cashier This Morning.
IS NOW ONE OF SHELDON LINE
By a deal which was put through
today, the Sheldon interests have
taken over the A. D. Stephens' inter
osts/in the, first. State Bank of little
ed the duties of cashier. Mr. French
and others interested in the deal
went to Little Fork this morning.
GEORGE H. FRENCH.
F. P. Sheldon, of Grand Rapids and
Minneapolis, will probably be presi
dent of the reorganized bank. Charles
S. Jameson, the present vice president
is a newspaper publisher of Little
Fork and it cannot be stated at this
time whether or not he will retain
his office.
It has been known here for some
time that a change was due in the
Little Fork bank. About three
months ago, the Stephens' interests
gave out that Cashier Muus was to
be replaced by a Bemidji man but the
change did not materialize. Last week
A. D. Stephens and his son, of Crook
ston, visited Bemidji and then went
to Little Fork where the bank was
inspected.
A dispatch from Little Fork last
week stated that Mr. Muus would be
come the head of another
which already has some or
subscribed.
?%^*^2*? M***$* 'ormertt^^ examination of the aifairs
treasurer of^eltramrcounty, assum-J
abank
its stock
ANNUAL MEETINGS TODAY
The First National and Northern
National banks are holding their an
nual meetings this afternoon in ac
cordance with a federal act which
states that they shall be held the sec
ond Tuesday in January.
ISLAND LAKE MAY
LOSE ITS CHARTER
State Official! Find It Hat Failed to
Send in Two Fef Cent of Li
cense Money to Fond.
BELTRAMI COUNTY IS OUT $100
Has Not Received Its Ten Per Cent
For Two Yean, as Only First
Payment Was Made.
ONE SALOON IN THE VILLAGE
Has Been Operating For Three Years
And Furnishes the Only Source
Of Revenue.
Failure to pay Beltrami county
$50 a year for the past two years
and the state of Minnesota $10 a
year for.three years, may result in
the passing of Island Lake, a village
about thirty miles ^orth of Bemidji.
The village of Island Lake has
been incorporated for six years, hut
in checking up the accounts of Min
nesota villages, Public Examiner
Andrew Fritz found that Island Lata
had not paid into the state inebriate
fund the two per.cent of saloon li
cense money received by hat village.
As the Hickerson and Dickinson
saloon is the only one operating there
the license money has amounted to
$500 per year. Since the last trus
tees were elected three years ago,
the saloon has paid in $1,500 license
money. It is. said that no improve
ments have been spade and that the
village is bankrupt'.
Examiner Fritz and Attorney Gen
eral Smith w^efe in Bemidji Saturday
and drove to Island Lake returning
Sunday, afternoon. They made a
fth
vIllag
ofo the village and at the state capi
tol yesterday announceW that white
the village claimed to have had an
election last fall, the official .returns
did not give the village figures. Mr.
Fritz will further examine the vil
lage books and following his report.
General Smith will determine wheth
er or not the village has forfeited its
rights.
A state law requires that there be
at least 125 persons in a community
before a village can be incorporated.
Island Lake has less than.fifty and
it is believed that this- fact will also
prove a point against it. Hickerson
and Dickinson run the only saloon
there and it is said that one of the
partners has been serving on the vil
lage council.
The affairs of Hickerson and
Dickinson have, been troubled for
sometime past. Last summer a federal
officer caused the arrest of the men
on charges of selling liquor to the
Indians of the Red Lake reservation
and those cases are still to come be
fore the federal court. Last tall,
they were arrested on a charge of
selling liquor on Sunday, the charge
having been prefered by W. F. Dick
ens, agent at Red Lake. The charge
against Dickinson was dismissed.
Hickerson was freed after a jury
trial. .i. .v
County Auditor George said this
morning that the village had made
the payment into the ten per cent
fund three years ago when the saloon
was first started but* that no money
had been received since then. Should
the village charter be taken, away
the saloon will pass to the control of
the county commissioners. As It has
been a sore spot in the flesh of the
administration of the Red Lake res
ervation, there will probably he a
warm fight before the commissioners
should any attempt be made to re
license the saloon. 1-^ .f
an
a
m
~g
^W:
FARMER BADLY BEATEN, LEFT
TO FREEZE HANDS AND FEET
ay vaited
Racine, Wis., Jan. 14.William
Rowe, a prominent farmer living oh
the Rochester road, three miles north
of Burlington was found lying un-k
conscious in his corn field at ten
o'clock Sunday night and is believed
to have been fatally injured in a fight
with pot-hunters. His skull *as
3

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