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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, January 17, 1913, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1913-01-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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BOOZE PARTY TO
BE INVESTIGATED
Xnud Wefald's Resolution Sent to the
Committee on Resolutions by a
Vote of 55 to 44.
CONSIDER RABBITS GOOD GAME
Sill to Allow Hunting With Ferrets
Causes Wordy War Between
House Members.
O'NEILL WORKS FOR WOODMEN
Proposes to Have a State Law Allow
ing Insurgents to Incorporate
in This State.
Mf United PMM.
St. Paul, Jan 17.Rep. Knud We
fald's resolution providing tor a legis
lative investigation of tne alleged
"booze party" at the capitol during
the governor's inaugural reception
was sent to the committee on public
buildings of the Minnesota nouse of
representatives Thursday by a vote of
55 to 44
Representative Wefald made a de
mand that his resolution calling for
a special committee of investigation
composed of five house members be
appointed, and added an amendment
calling for an investigation of all oth
er offices where liquor might have
been dispensed.
Rep. H. H. Dunn, who gave notice
of debate last Tuesday, moved that
the resolution be referred to the com
mittee on public buildings, declaring
that "these petty special investiga
tion committees do little good and
that a violation of the law should
properly be a matter for a grand jury
to take upbut let's not take up the
time of this house with such investi
gations, for they will discover noth
ing that every member of the legis
lature does not already know."
Representative Wefald said that
he did not intend, as had been im
portuned, to drop the matter.
Another wordy battle was started
yesterday in the house when Rep. L.
D. Lydiard, Minneapolis, moved the
passage of the senate bill repealing
the law preventing hunting of rab
bits with ferrets in Hennepin coun
ty, Rep J. Lennon declared that
the bill should go to a committee be
fore being passed. The measure was
finally placed on the calendar and
will come for final passage Friday.
The biennial budget appropriation
ofr the state university providing
$1,300,000 was introduced.
An antitreating bill appeared
whereby Rep H. II. Putnam, Battle
Lake, would prohibit treating and
impose a fine of from $5 to $10 on all
persons who dispense free drinks, or
ask another to have one. The saall
loonkeepers will also be subject to
penalty for dispensing snuch. "No
Treating Allowed" shall be the sign
hung in every saloon if the bill
passes
The Woodman bill, permitting the
insurgents of the W A to incor
porate in Minnesota, was introduced
by D. P. O'Neill, of Thief Ri\er Falls.
It was referred to the judicial com
mittee.
Rep. J. Greene. St. Paul, was
joint author of a bill introduced to
fPoUtlnu on laat oaget
SCOOP
JH- 4 jt V *m -W.i*v JWv' iV
V-V I
\fc\
THE"$&*
THE CUB
REPORTER
S'
FRED R. MOORE.
Nsw York Negro Publisher Named
by Teft as Minister to Liberia
TWO IN POLICE COURT
Two cases were tried before Judge
Simons this morning, the first being
that of Clarence Brown, charged
with vagrancy. Brown claimed he
was looking for work when the po
lice told him to leave town, but heEditor
delayed and was picked up the next
morning. Judge Simons gave him
the choice of fifteen days in the coun
ty jail without option of a fine or
five minutes to leave town. He left.
The second was that of Tom Smith,
charged wih being drunk. Smith
said he came from Cass Lake to visit
a friend in the hospital, and had been
staying up with him every night. Last
evening he claims he came down town
and took a few drinks and then fell
asleep in the depot. Chief of Police
Hoyt picked him up and landed him
in the city jail. Smith insisted that
this was the first time he had ever
been arresed in his life, but Officer
Denley claims the man was sent from
town once before and has proved a
public nuisance for some time. Judge
Simons gave him ten days in the
city jail.
MAIONE MADE MANAGER.
A dance will be given next Friday
by the "Big Bemidg" basket ball
team in the city hall. The team has
a small debt which they wish to pay
before taking on tny other teams to
play and the boys believe they can
make enough from the dance to putfrom
them on a good financial condition.
Brandon, Bemidji's star forward,
will not be here for two weeks but
it is probable that the boys will play
a game with Cass Lake some time in
the near future. James Malone was
appointed manager of the team to
succeed Maurice Ryan.
GILLETTE OFFERS PRIZES.
M. S. Gillette has offered prizes for
persons bowling over 200 on
hismonths.
alley. Fifty cents will be given to
each persdn bowling over 200 and one
dollar will be given to each person
bowling over 225. Fifty cents Will
also be awarded to every person
making either a strike or spare in
each frame.
BARTENDERS TO DANCE.
Next Friday night the bartenders
will give their annual benefit dance
in the city hall. The proceeds will go
to the families of the deceased mem
bers of the order.
1 3 I |f
ANDREW ANDERSON DEAD
Clearbrook Man Who Wat Working
Near Funkley Died After Being
Hit by Falling Tree.
BODY TAKEN TO EAU CLAIRE
VOLUME 10. NUMBER 223. BEMIDJI, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 17, 1913.
TEN CENTS PER WgEK
Andrew Anderson, of Clearbrook,
died in the hospital yesterday morn
ing following an accident in a lumber
camp near Funkley. Anderson had
been working in the' woods this fall
for the Coolidge-Schussler people and
on Tuesday got in the way of a fall
ing timber and was hit.
He was brought to Bemidji on theof
night train and rushed to the hospi
tal where it was found that his spine
was crushed. He died after being in
the hospital one day. Relatives were
immediately notified -and they came
to Bemidji yesterday. Anderson's
home was in Eau Claire, Wisconsin,
(prior to his moving to Bagley and
burial will be from that place.
Anderson was forty-one years old
and leaves a wife.
MYLIUS MIST BE
DEPORTED AT ONCE
Who Was Found Guilty of
Libel of King George of England,
Cannot Enter This Country.
By United Preaa.
Washington, Jan. 17.Edward F.
Mylius, the English journalist, con
victed of libeling King George, can
not be admitted to the United States
because the crime for which he was1904,
adjudged guilty, was not a political
crime. This was Secretary Nagel's
decision Thursday afternoon, review
ing the finding of the Ellis Island
board. Mylus will be deported on
the first steamer after the Ellis Island
ahthorities receive Nagel's report.
Mylius was found guilty in Eng
land of libelling King George by pub
lishing a story that the sovereign
had conracted a morgantic marriage
at Gibraltar with the daughter of a
British admiral, prior to his marriage
with Queen Mary.
FIRE WITHOUT MATCHES.
Fred C. Reed, a boy scout of Wash
ington, D. C, has received a prize
Ernest Thompson Seton. chief
scout of the Boy Scouts of America
for his quickness in lighting a fire
without the use of matches. Timed
by two different watches, he made a
fire in thirty-one seconds by the
useing
of a bow and stick. The bow and
stick is the method of friction that
the Indians used. Reed's record beats
anything that Seton himself ever
did, and also eclipses the record of
Norton in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Nor
ton held the* record for several
When he made it Seton sent
him a bow and stick for fire lighting
as a trophy to be held until his rec
ord should be broken." The bow and
stick now goes to Reed in Washing
ton
ANOTHER CHIMNEY FIRE.
The fire department was called
out uiis morning to a small chimney
fire at the home of A. T. Hanson, 1504
Beltrami avenue. No damage was
done and the fire was out before the
department arrived.
INDIANS BADLY TREATED
Congressional Committee Reports
Evidence of Collision by Lumber
Companies and Indians.
CLAPP "RIDER" A BLUNDER
Washington, D. Jan. 17.De-
claring that the Chippewa Indians of
the White Earth reservation in Min
nesota have been the victims of the
greed of lumber companies, that leg
islation backed by certain Minnesota
members of congress has resulted in
the "exploitation and despoliation"
the Indians and that the Clapp
"rider" of 1906, which granted mixed
blood Indians their lands in fee sim
ple was a "dreadful blunder," the
congressional committee appointed to
investigate conditions at White
Eartn made its official report^o
congress yesterday. Congressman
James R. Graham of Illinois and
Henry George, Jr., of New York,
members of the committee, visited
the Minnesota reservation in Febru
ary last and took the testimony of
witnesses at hearings in Minneapo
lis, Detroit, Minn., and in Washing
ton.
The committee finds that:
"The Indians of the White Earth
reservation have been the victims of
a series of governmental acts design
ed only to aid lumber companies and
real estate speculators.
"In the first sale of pine lands on
the reservation in 1900 there were
'underestimates and collusion' in theTepper
interests of big lumbermen, and that
the Indians did not receive one-half
the fair value of the timber.'
The Clapp 'rider' of 1904, provid
ing^hat timber on allotments might
be^d/ $ ^Ste^njjrjfcn *gt o*
providing for additional allot
ments of pine land permitted, were
followed by allotments by Indian
Agent Simon Michelet in which
'fraudulent partiality' was shown,
that the best pine allotments fell into
the hands of those intended in ad
vance to receive them in the interest
of the lumber companies.
"Complaint against conditions on
the reservation, made by Rev. Charles
Wright, a Chippewa, a minister of
the Episcopal church, was unheeded
by Indian Commissioner Francis E.
Leupp, and that Leupp wrote Mr.
Wright 'supercilious, aggravating
and unjust letters.'
"The lapp 'rider' of 1906 was the
rlimax of the drama, that land sharks
and lumber companies anticipated the
passage of the act and that its pas
sage was followed by 'a period of
detue
bauchery and shameless orgies.'
"The manner of. passing the Clapp
'rider' 'may be of more than pass
interest to congress.'
"Practically all the pine of the re
servation came into the possession of
Nichols-Chisholm, the Wild Rice and
the Park Rapids Lumber' companies
respectively, the territory being ap
portioned to them by prearranged
subdivisions and in most instances
'mixed blood leaders piloting the un
offending victims to their downfall.'
"D. S. Hall was appointed'removal
agent for Mille Lacr Chippewas, re
ceived $31,845.45 in salary and exprivate
penses and removed fifty-one Indians
from the Mille Lacs to the White
Earth reservation in eight years.,
"Of $40,000 appropriated by con
gress to pay the. Mille Lacs Indians
for improvements in getting them to
move, Gus Beaulieu, mixed blood
leader, got $7,420.
"Terrible conditions of disease
exist in the full blood districts."
i -1
Whv Not Coax It Up A Ladder And Let It Break Its Neck "HOP
^^r:lir^^|i^igl!g^li^L
PERRY BELMONT.
He la Urging Cluba to March In
Wilson .Inauguration Parade.
BOWLING ALLEY ROBBED
Thief Entered Tepper and Lemke's
Place Wednesday and Cleaned
Out the Show Case.
Some sneak thief broke into the
and Lemke bowling alley on
Wednesday night and cleaned the
show case of tobacco, cigars, candy
and other small articles. Entrance
was gained by breaking the glass in
a rear window/ No clue haB been
found as to who was the culprit. It7
was some local person tha has been
visiing the alley as the.* manner in
which they gained their, entrance in
dicates that the grounds had bean
examined before hand. How the par
ties escaped without being noticed is
a mystery unless a rig had been used
as the articles taken were bulky and
one person would have had consider
able trouble carrying them off alone
without being noticed.
were discussed. Several play books
have been sent for and the play to
be presented will be decided on some
will be chosen to assist with the play. I
NEW WARD IS OPENED.
One large ward at the Samaritan
hospital has* been opened and is al
ready crowded with patients. Car
penters working on the private wards
are rushing the work to completion
so as to accommodate the patients
that are now forced to occupy a room
with other patients. Many of the
wards will be furnished by
lodges of this city and local physic
ians.
HIGH SCHOOL DANCE SATURDAY
After the High school basket ball
game tomorrow night the boys will
give a dance to entertain the Foss
ton boys. The dance will be held in
the roller rink.
5 1
tb
A meeting was held by the senior!
a
mor
ou
time during the coming week. At I "ln
next meeting of the class a coach'f
wan
The best talent in the High school I am no longer the head of the Great
will be used in his play and will Northern. But the company is fak
prooably be a big success. condition its credit is good an4.
there is but one bit of road yet to bs*
built, that is through Montana, and
that is being built now. Younger men
are carrying the burden but they ar%
having it easier than I did in tha
early days."
So spoke James J. Hill at the ban*
quet given in his honor at the Mark
ham hotel last evening. Mr. Hill
was introduced by Judge C. W. Stan-.
ton, chairman of the evening, wlUK
said: "Banquets are usually given
to men from who we expect to re
ceive something. This banquet re-~
verses the usual order of things. We.,
are here tonight because we have al-.
ready received something and wish
to acknowledge the gift."
Mr. Hill was in a cheerful mood'
last evening and during his talk of*
forty-five minutes he commanded
the undivided attention of his aud~
ience. He dwelt at some length on
the development of the Northwests
and said that the soil in this vicinity
was as good as could be found any~
where and a lot better than somev
Mr. Hill looks for a great tide of im
migration into Northern Minnesota,,
next spring.
-J*
"NO COUNTRY IS
BETTER," SAID HILL
"Empire Builder" Enthusiastic Ore*j
Bemidji, and Says the Land Only
Needs Development.
COMMUNITY SPIRIT IS GOOD
Told Banqueters That It Augured
Well For the City That the
People Pull Together.
THOUSANDS SEE NEW DEPOT
Many Disappointed That Former
Great Northern Head Would Not
Speak Was Talking Farming.
Salient Sentences.
At different times during his visit
in Bemidji yesterday, James J. Hill
said:
"Manure is worth one-third of thfr
value of the crop for it will increase
the yield that much and so is worth a
third of whatever the market will
bring.
"The people we need on the land
are strong men with good families
men who are not afraid of work with
their hands.
"Prance today is the banking coun~
try of the world. Why? Because it*
(prosperity is founded in the soil.
Spain's gold mines were exhausted)
long ago, but the French gold mint
is constantly growing richer.
Sir \anjjjs DraJge was a good oJ$
)"I am a farmer by proxy. I find.
the mep and tell them what I want
done. The rest they^do themselves,
IThe tabulated report of the work
done by Professor Crane and his a**-
.sistants last year will be publish*^
next montlf."
know*
tlme-
Yo
"I feel at homteh in Bemidji. I feslt
that you are my neighbors and that
_j jwe are good neighbors. I like the.
community spirit
istoneeOf
SENIORS MAY GIVE A PLAY.
sign
be8
depot herhere.thIt is las on I
ne
tn
class of the High school last night ordered and beyond the possibility
and the prospects of a class play,
ordinary interest in
ihado.f
Saf
doubta ever will order. So I
tn
that it-was built to fully carry
se
promises, anyons llvesv
setings oldwill be seventy-
lon
a
September, if I live. And
a a
ex liv
iv
A.

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