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The Bemidji daily pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, January 18, 1913, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063381/1913-01-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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^Tm-Wj^Mjpt PIONEE
ENTSJRBjD^AS* 8SGQND~1LA 38 MAT
TB3R AT THE POSTQWBaCE AT BE-
MIDJI. MIlfNS UNDER JHE ACT OP
MARCH WPmym
.In, thJ^t^Vi^iidJi Die papers are
flellvereTby'eaMiPWfWiIre thedeli*
ery la irregular please make' immediate
complaint to this office. Telephone 81.
Out of town subscribers will confer a
favor if they will report when *hey ao
not get their papers-promptly.
Every subscriber to the Daily Pioneer
will reoeive notice about ten days be
fore his time expires, giving him an
opportunity to make an advance pay
ment before the paper is Anally stopped.
Subscription Bates.
One month by carrier $ .40
One year, by carrier 4.00
Three months, postage paid 1.00
Six months, postage paid 2.00
One year, postage paid 4.00
The Weekly Moneer.
Eight pages, containing a, summary
o'l the news of the week.. Bublisbed
very Thursday and sent postage paid
to any address for $1.60 tB advance.
Published every afternoon except Sun
day by the Bemidjl Pioneer Publishing
Company.
a. CABBOBT. a. m. str.
XAXOU) J. OAJTB, Stiftor.
We Apologize.
Through an error on the part of
the editor in writing the account of
Hill banquet yesterday, the names of
M. J. Brown and Senator O'Neil were
omitted from the list of speakers.
There was no excuse for the omission
and we apologize to these gentlemen.
Both were on the program and both
gave exceptionally good, lively talks.
The Graham Investigation.
The report of the Graham invest!
gating committee, of which extracts
were printed in this paper yesterday,
has brought to light many facts
which the people of Minnesota sus
pected had existed but of which they
had no proof. In order that the read
ers of the Pioneer may have more in
formation on the matter, the follow
ing additional paragraphs are print
ed tonight from the report.
The report describes the White
Earth reservation as a "rich heri-
tage." "It embraces approximately
796,000 acres of land with valuable
forests of pine, probably 500,000,000
feet, and an ample quantity and var
iety of hardwood for fuel," said the
report. "A large portion of the land
was of great fertility and being
prairie was easy to break and culti
vate.
"The first inroad upon the reser
vation was of the acquirement of four
townships in the northeast corner,
and was made by the lumber com
panies. First, a statement was se
cured from those in authority that
the Indians did not need all the land
in the reservation. Then, under the
act of Jan. 14, 1889, these four
townships were ceded back by the
Indians to the government to be sold
for their benefit. The pine on them
was to be disposed of at not less than
$3 per 1,000 feet and the agricultural
lands at not less than $1.25 per acre.
Through incompetency or for some
reason, the estimator grossly under
estimated the amount of the standing
pine timber. It was advertised to be
sold at auction to the highest bidder
at Crookston, Minn., Nov. 27, 1900.
"Your committee finds, from un
disputed testimony that this sale was
fraudulent in the details of its accom
plishment. In addition to he false
esimates used to fix the minimum
price there was gross collusion among
the real purchasers. The evidence
taken clearly demonstrated this. One
witness testified that after partici
patin in the bids for one day he re
ceived the sum of $5,000 for the pur
chases that he had made, upon his
promise to depart and not further
interiere in the sale. We believe that
by such underestimates and collusion
in the interests of big lumbermen
the Indians did not receive one half
the fair value of the timber on theBe
four sections. No authorized person
was present to represent them or
watch their interests. Most of the
purchases were made by paid agents
of lumber companies, their principals
meanwhile standing by mute.
"The resultisg scandal was so great
that rumors of it reached Secretary
of the Interior B. A. Hitchcock, who
took such measures as he could to in
vestigate. Finally the purchases
were required to make sworn state
ments that they were not parties to
any collusion before certificates of
sale would issue. This' was very
easy, as they were mere dummies, and
their principals, the men to whom
they afterwards conveyed, were the
principals in collusion. The Secretary
was thus hoodwinked, abstracts of
title made for the benefit of the com
mittee fully substantiated the charges
of this conspiracy, it appearing there
from that many years after the sale
deeds were placed on record showing
that practically all the timber with
in certain boundaries was secured by
one concern, and that within certain
other boundaries by another. These
two concerns, to-wit: The Nichols
Chisholm Lumber company, and the
Wild Rice Lumber company, are- the
same concerns that afterwards se
cured the balk of the timber upon
the remaining thirty-two townships."
The report then says that the re
sulting scandal was so great that
Secretary Hitchcock refused to make
any. more sales on "tree estimates."
Following this came the passage of
the. Morris-act in 1902, providing for
sales by sealed bids, and on scale
measurement.
Statute Is Evaded.
"But by some process these reform
measures, recommended by Secretary
Hitchcock, had coupled with them in
congress another provision which en
abled the big lumber companies to
purchase standing timber without
the land," the committee says. "They
were thereby enabled to evade a Min
nesota statute which prohibited tha
ownership of more than 5,0,00 acres
of land by any corporation, and hav
ing gotten rid of the laws, which,
stood in their way, they proceeded to
acquire and did acquire large quan
ties of timber on Indian lands."
The report says that all this was
but a prologue to the drama of the
exploitation and spoliation of the In
dians through legislation by congress.
"There still remained thirty-two
townships," the report says. "The
four townships referred to had not
appeased the timber appetite of the
saw mills. Until 1905" pine lands
were not allotted. Legislation was
enacted by congress providing that
the timber on allotments previously
made, or that might subsequently be
made, could be sold by the Indians.
"This legislation is known as the
first Clapp amendment, although it
was a rider on the Indian appropria
tion bill of April 21, 1904. Coinci
dent with it came the Steenerson act,
originating in the house, providing
in effect that the pine land in the
White Earth reservation should be
allotted. This was the act of April
28, 1904. Pursuant to the Steenerson
acj, arrangements for making such
allotments began soon after. The
agent at White Earth, Simon Mich
elet, was made allotting officer. By
various pretexts this allotment did
not begin until April 25, 1905, about
one year after the passage of that
authorizing act. Meanwhile certain
parties employed by large lumber
companies were going through the
pine timber making estimates, and
parties looking for themselves and
for others the desirable timber allot
ments were engaged likewise. Thus
there was ample opportunity for the
fraudulent partiality that was shown
to have occurred when the allotting
did take place.
The report then tells of the atcounts
tempt to sell timber on Indian lands
by sealed bids, as provided in the
WE EETUBH
Today plcturss madt from
th films you send In this
moratns
Enlarging, Framing, Copying.
HAKKBRUP
*Tklr48t. Bemidjl.
Do you want
THE BEfiT GROCERIES
found In Bemidji
Come right hre and gst
them, as we pride onrselres
on haying only the best
money can buy.
SCHWAJTDT ft MABIN
JunittMtaAve.
Bemidjl Minnesota,
MoOTIAIO
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Dry Goods, Shoes, Groceries
and ProTislons.
Third St. Bemidjl
We strive to aaU.
THAT'S NATURAL.
But we strive harder to please.
-THATS SERVICE.
lOourteeoe attention has
won over-many Jewelry cue*
tomers to us.
^eorge^T. Baker ft Co.
Clapp amendment of 1904. This was
the sale at whiojh Fred Herrlck, the
Wisconsin lumber man, went into the
Minnesota field and overbid the Nich
ols-Chisholm company. The report
says that at this sale the Nlehols
Chisholm company put in a fake bid
Jtorthe Lvman-Irwin company. The
committee declares that the Nichols
Chisholm company, finding itself
outbid, succeeded in having the suc
cessful bidder's offer set aside.
The. Clapp Amendment.
The climax of- the drama was
reached In the enactment of themore
Clapp amendment of June 21, 1906,gress
giving mixed bloods on the reserva
tion fee title to their lands.
The report describes the climax of
the drama as follows:
"Your committee finds that, the
next steps taken on behalf of these
suffering Indians was that embraced
in the second. so-called Clapp amend
ment of June 21, 1906, which took
the form of a rider upon another In
dian appropriation bill. This pro
vided a means whereby not only the
timber, but the lands could be obwise,
tained from adult mixed bloods, and
from the full bloods when declared
competent, and if both of these pro
visions failed title might be obtained
by sale of the lands for taxes. As a
consequence of this legislation the
greatest harm resulted. The land
sharks, anticipating its passage, had
by means of $25 mortgages, tied up
a large and valuable part of the
reservation.
"The enactment of this legislation
was followed by a period of debauch
ery and1
shameless orgies. The white
and mixed-blood land sharks, the
hirelings of the lumber companies,
and the alleged bankers in the vil
lages along the Soo line, were en
gaged in taking deeds and mortgages
indiscriminately from mixed and full
bloods,.adults and minors. The.most
persuasive arguments with the In
dians were contained in bottles and
jugs. The land sharks bought the
Indians' land with 'tin money,* that
is, orders payable in certain 'stores'
in merchandise only. The lumber
companies gave due bills for deeds,
thus affording their mixed-blood em
ployes ample opportunities for specu
lation, which opportunities were
speedily improved. The result was
that Indians who received the 'tin
money' brought back to the reserva
tion from Detroit, shoddy merchan
dise, broken down pianos, ancient
sewing machines and large quantities
of firewater. Indians who received
the due bills were the easy victims of
the sharks, who took enormous dis
for cashing their paper, and
in some instances 'invested'* the small
balance in great expectations. Com-
***M*******************
I
NOETHEEH 6K0CERY
COlOttJtT
i
WHOLESALE
QROCBR8
I
Get Tour
HOUSEHOLD UTENSILS
and FARM IMPLEMENTS
of
C.E. BATTLES
The Mariware sfocaant
Bemidjl, Minn.
^\5************************
RtsfcuJarly and systemau
call/. If you receive your pay
weeny, lay some aside each
week, it monthly do it meath
ly. The de&ars will pile up
surprisingly. -.H-*"
TRY IT
-^NawJs the-tims to-opflna-*
bans: account'with the
1':-/
SE0oT^YBg|T^BANK
BA1K
*&-
THE BEMIDJI DAILY PIOIXKB
paratively few made sensible invest
ments or ev^n did an honest stroke of
work until the results of these sales
had vanished. The theory on which
the law seems to rest, namely, that
a slight admixture' of white blood
would by some magical process bring
discretion and businesB-eapacity, was
thus demonstrated to be without
foundation, and proved to be a cruel
blunder."*$&-"* t\' -v A -7 &
The report says that in the belief
that the manner of securing the pas
sage of thiB legislation may be of
thas passing interest to con
and to the public, attention is
called to a letter written to a consti
tuent by Halvor Steenerson, repre
sentative in congress of the district
in which the reservation is situated.
The letter was introduced as testi
mony before the committee.
The lettar, given in full in the re
port, says that the house of represen
tatives would not pass a bill taking
away from the secretary of the in
terior authority to remove restric
tions on Indians when he deemed it
but that the proposed legisla
tion might be put on the appropria
tion bill in the senate, approved by
the house conference and be secured
in this way, "Now I want you to un
derstand." read the letter, "that you
could no more pass a bill taking this
power away from the secretary in
the present house of representatives
than you oculd fly. The Indian af
fairs committee is opposed to it and
the department is naturally opposed
to,it and you could not get such a
measure on the calendar. So that the
only possible way to get the house to
concur in such a measure would be
the way that is now in progress, that
is by attaching it in the senate to an
appropriation bill and thereby bring
ing it into conference."
^Nobody Loves Him.'
PatienceAnd she married that
man? "Z
PatriceYes, she has!
"But did she love him?"
"Oh, I think not. I don't see how
inybody-could love him. I guess she
married him out of sympathy. He was
i baseball umpire, von know,"
HWFET TO MAH
RELIABLE HOM E TREATMEN
The. ORRINE, treatment, for. the Drink Habit can be used with absolute con-
fidence. Tt destroys all desire for whisky, beer or other aleobolic stimulants.
Thousands have successfully* used.it and have been restored to lives of sobriety
and usefulness. -Can be given secretly.
ORltlNE-is :prepared in. two. forms: No. 1, secret treatment, a pow.der, abr
solutely tasteless and. odorless, given secretly in food or drink ORRINB^ No. 2,
in pill form, is for those who desire to take, voluntary treatment.
If. you fail to get results from OBBIN'E after a trial your money will be
refunded. Costs only $1.00 per box. Ask for free booklet telling all about OR-
RINE,
CVTY DRUG STORE, Beltrami Ave.
It matters not where you reside.or what you want, the merchants below can it set for you At a price that will defy competition. Every merchant is
reliable and will give you the best value for your money.
FOR GOOD THINGS TO EAT
WTO
ROEAHlKAMnrER
"THEY MAT
207 Fourth. atMtt, Bsmidji.
Pksas,%U.
i
3
ONIAMILAJi.
J6BH A. amnsa.
ODD FELLOW! BflUWHt.
i************************
OUR
merchandise sales are always
on the increase land eaoh
month has been better than
the last. If you are not al
ready a^ustemsr, yeu do net
knewiheqoaUty
weH we ean please
you and satisfy
r* you in quantity.
i QJ:
^*.Bemidji, p?iwk*K*&$i *as? Jnlnn,,
^*n r%
&:* *J*^*4*--*'*'*^*-*^*
i
k
C~
PAID ADVERTISEMENT.
For Thii Series, $10.
I hereby announce that 1 am a can
didate for judge of the Municipal
Court of this City, which office is to
Jw filled at tha coming c*$y election,
and I respectfully spllcitsjthe support
of the citizens of^BemfpfJi.*
HERBERT J.^OUU.
PAID ADVERTISEMENT:
For This Series, $10.00
I hereby announce that I am a
candidate-for the office of judge of
the municipal court of th ity of
Bemidjl, at the coming city election
to be held in and for said city on thai
18th day of February*. 19/1AV
I respectfully solicit, the support
of the people of Bemidjl.
JOHN L. BROWN.
Mrs. A. R. Tabor, of Crider, Mo.,
had been troubled with sick head
ache for about five years, when she
began taking Chamberlain's Tablets.
She has taken two bottles of them
jand they hav5ouredi,her. Sick head
ache is caused by a disordered stom
ach for which these tablets are esderer.
pecially intended. Try, them* get
well and sjay well. Sold .by. Barker's
Drug gtor,e.Adv.
NO CNU*GH Se*MANV.
Lovelorn-rJfou wish me to elope
with, your .daughter! Why, .sir?
Har1duppe--Beca U9, no wedding
bills for jne.
Kept Busy.
"What do you do when it gets too
cold to play golf, Mr. Niblick?"
"Well, as a rule, I keep hoping for
an early spring or a chance to fO
south, for a month or two."
n\
TOMtHAET
Dray,and Transfer
SAFE AND PIANO MOVING
Res. Phone 68
818 America Avenue
All kinds of building ma
terial, as nmch-br.as4itUe.as
you like at the
ST. B2LAIRE DETAIL LUM-
BSI COMPANY.
Coal and wood also for sale
Minnesota Ave. and R. R. S.
BEMIDJI MBH*O* HOUS*E*
814 Minnesoto Ave., Bemidjl
Wa*
i Minnesota Avenue ^4*
*acfl, BBMHMI v-:^
^5
1
S^k^*'
^MINN.^*
*^-*T *^1*
t* Wrapped in Wax Paper. Hi*
jOur local merehanto and *_ Bottled MIBt as^ Cream
theotUeimanUestoekhold- WHOfissBALBftS B'M*
ers of thmcbanki and^RETAHiERS
*j*
:-^j^W^mm
Wholesale and retail Pla
nos, Organs and Sewing--.*
Machines.
Phone 678.
?F*
j*'y^ja(i!i *4j "-4rkrf-* fir 'iff. ti-
BISIAR, MANAGER.
S
#J4AM^ 4^.tM
S
Instantly Edieew Swollen, inflamed
Nose, Sesd, TJ*roatr-You Breathe
FreelyBall Heajfetche Goe*r
Nasty Discharge Stops.:
Try "Ely's Cream Balm." /'ri.
Get a small bottle anyway, just to
try itApply a little in the nostrils
and instantly your clogged nose and
sopped-up air passages of the head
will open you' will breathe freely
dullness and headache disappear. By
morning! the catarrh, cold-in-head
or catarrhal sore throat will be gone.
End such misery now! Get the
small bottle of "Ely's Cream Balm"
at any drug store. This sweet, frag-
,-J. Point In His Favor.
"You ought to be ashamed of your
self to roam aimlessly about and nev
er do any work." said Mrs. Naggers,
to the ragged specimen of bumanity
who stood at her door.
"That's true, mum," replied the wan
"And yet you must give me
credit for one thing."
"And what is that?"
"Although I have been traveling
over the world for more than twenty
fears, I have never yet acquired the
ouvenir habit."
''$*??-''.
:^f-^:
i
Office Phone 12*
Mystery.'
BaconI see Alaska has its first
dining-car made out of an old coach
in the Cordova shops and managed by
man and his wife.
ajghert-rVery interesting. But I
thg& it would be more important to
know what some of the dishes, served
n the dining-car are made of.
DEAFNESS CANNOT BE CUBED.
by looeJ ^applications, as they cannot
reach the diseased portion of the ear.
There-is only one way to cure deafness,
and )hat is by constitutional remedies.
Deafness is caused by an inflamed con
dition, of the mucous lining of the Eus
tachian Tube. When this tube is in
flamed you have a rumbling' sound or
imperfect hearing:, and where, it is en
tirely closed. Deafness is the result,
and unless the inflammation can be tak
en out and this tube restored to its nor
mal condition, hearing will be destroyed
forever nine cases, out of ten are caused
by Catarrh, which is nothing but an in
flamed condition of the mucous surfaces.
We will give-One-Hundred Dollars-for
any case of deafness (caused by ca
tarrh) that cannot be cured by Hall's
Catarrh Cure*- .Send for circulars, free.
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, o.Ao.
Sold by Druggists, 75c.
Take Hall's Family Pills for consti
pation.
BEMIDJI BREWING CS
FURNITURE
J. I. LAHB
Furniture, Rugs,and Stoves,
Undertaking.
Phone call 178-2..
823 Minnesota Ave.
BARXEE'S DEFG
JEWELSY STORE
Wholesalers and Retailers
Service and satisfaction. Mail
Orders given that- same ser
vice you get in person.
BARKER'S
Third St. .Bemidji,
Minn.* mn
GUENTHEE ft MEHLH0EN
Contractors and Builders
Phones 431,
376'#*-
4
Beaiiji, Mian
Iri.
A
*t*
v3 3*t
The store that treats you
RIGHT.
Crockery Glssswfe, House
moid Necessities used every
day. Theasoome to the store
that saves you money. -^_
4 +Mt* .!k*^*****i#k******%*4**
^2BW
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18,1913.
OPENS UP NOSTRILS, CLEARS HEAD,
ENDS COLDS OR CATARRH AT ONCE
1
ran* balnardissolves by the heat of the
.nostrils penetrates and heals the in
flamed, swollen membrane which
lines the nose, head and throat:
clears the air passages stops nasty
discharges and a feeling of cleansing,
soothing relief comes immediately.
Don't lay awake tonight strug
gling for breath, with head stuffed
nostrils closed, hawking and blowing.
Catarrh or a cold, with JtS running
nose, foul mucous dropping into the
throat, and raw dryness is distressing
but truly needless.j-a
Put your faithjust oncein
'Ely's Cream Balm" and your cold or
catarrh will surely disappear.Adv.
H. IC MURPHY
'JuilA
5 .*rw* A, O'lMttrfwBawmr SJlggj.
Bamfefll. Minn.
JTB^GIVEHHAEDWAEIOO.*
WHOLESALE AND BETAIL
HAiDWAll
Phone 6t 81 Minnesbtn Avet
L. P. ECXSTEUM
Plumbing, Steam and Hot*
Water Heating, Sewer and
Water Connections.
Phone 666-80S
320 Beltrami Ave. $
TBS CE00EJT0M lllMBjtm
Jf-'-"1
COMFAJTr Wi^
*eiu^^^% r&
LUMBER, LATH AND
ft **t.
Ff
DIRECTOR "r
ANDCMBALMEft
rfri-si 0*ttram!Av*.
SIS)
INSURANCE
Rentals Bonds, RflalEstiti
First- Mb*-tgTat?e Loans
-City aiid Farm-
Property-
W
THE TASTETELLS"
AVOID SPECULATION
Invest In Land
At only $10.00 per acre
You have the
ohoices.of
*3t .1
12 all
Joining 40v
The land is easily cleared j^ d:
graded roads to Turtle River
Station.
Minnesota Ave. emidli

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